The Vacation

And so there it was. A holiday, a vacation, a trip to somewhere that was not the hospital, Mamma Jones’ or a basic hotel in Wakefield located off the M1. My first holiday post diagnosis and post transplant is complete, it is done, it is over. Finito. As I type this, I am sitting in a bar surrounded by my hand luggage, EMan and Mamma Jones waiting to disembark from this tiny boat from where we will begin our journey back to London Town. I am using this waiting time most productively and I am reflecting. I will probably still be reflecting when I return to London.

I love reflecting. I seem to reflect all the time. My permanent state of reflection was, as the title suggests, present throughout the last seven days. If anything, being in different surroundings and different circumstances, outside of my protective myeloma bubble, made me reflect more than usual. I know what you are thinking and yes, ‘crikey’ would be appropriate right now or indeed so would ‘shit, here she goes again’.

I can honestly say that this holiday has been the most delightful seven days I have experienced in a long time. I may have been a lazy, cruising and thus slightly unimaginative Brit abroad, but in being that, I have been able to safely see beauty in things that one would not find in my 21 month long Bermuda Triangle. That is all I wanted. I have sailed into various pretty ports, enjoyed the luxury of using my credit card for multiple massages and acupuncture, sat and ate and expanded and took so many photographs that only I will ever be interested in them. I have been to Venice, Kotor, Corsica, Corfu, Genoa and Rome, and rediscovered my love of a sunset. Tasty.

20140514-131858.jpg

Of course, things are never that straightforward. Everyone, accept the self entitled elderly folk on this boat, knows that I have been delivered quite a curve ball in life, limiting my enjoyment of it. I can say with a tongue most bittersweet that going on holiday, whilst wonderful, highlights a number of the the bad things myeloma loves to dish up at the all you can eat buffet. My current state of reflection may exaggerate it, but I knew on Day 2 that myeloma makes the act of a holiday hard. I knew this when I was forced by my body into going for an afternoon nap, whilst simultaneously feeling I had just been kicked in the back by an ass as his buddy, the wild boar attempted to remove my armpit. Everyday since has featured a similar period or periods of sheer exhaustion, zombie-dom and an uncontrollable desire for Oramorph. Evidentially, these periods have been at odds with my overall excitement and determination.

A holiday by definition is a period of leisure and recreation, and will usually experience an interruption to one’s schedule. For me, my daily life is structured far more than I wish it and this is done to allow me the chance to feel like I am living it. In going on holiday, I naively assumed that I would not need to factor in as many break times and that my sheer will and excitement at being on holiday would overpower My Myeloma. I was incorrect. Myeloma makes holidaying hard. It makes it hard because I had to wait so long to have one skewing my expectations, a change in routine impacts on both my pain levels and the productively of my bowel, I could not swim not sunbathe, and most of all, I felt like my need to lie down or go to bed at 22:00hrs every night was wasted time. It was like resetting my understanding of a holiday.

And this is the bitter part. I knew my holiday reality, I think I did anyway otherwise I would not have agreed to a cruise or planned the excursions I did, but I think I really hoped that My Myeloma would not impact on my ability to do whatever I wanted to do. The only limitations on a holiday should be monetary and I have always found ways around this. There is no way round the fatigue.

Fortunately, I am well versed in managing the disappointment myeloma produces and thus, the sweetness far overpowered the bitterness. There may have been frustration, but I managed to find the fun in every good hour my body was awarded. I even have a few achievements in physical capability, which has made me think that in a few years, maybe my body will let me walk up Monument. Who knows? It’s a nice feeling to hope for something that feels remotely within the realms of possibility again.

It was silly of me to think that a holiday would be any different to any other part of my life when it comes to my relationship with myeloma. There are limits and concessions to be made everywhere.

20140514-132026.jpg

And so there it was. A holiday, a vacation, a trip to somewhere that was not the hospital, Mamma Jones’ or a basic hotel in Wakefield located off the M1. It is complete, it is done, it is over. As suspected, this holiday meant so much more to me than simply a holiday. It was a huge milestone and one that I gained more from than what it showed me I had lost, and my
my my, is that a wonder.

EJB x

P.S. In 10 days, I am off to Berlin. There, I will no doubt learn more concessions whilst pretending to be like any other 30 year old. One is excited.

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , ,

One thought on “The Vacation

  1. Terri J says:

    So glad you had a good time. Yes you had to make concessions but you paced yourself & did it. We are 10 days out from our cruise. We are landing in Copenhagen, boarding a Norwegian cruise line & visiting Germany, Estonia, Stockholm, Helsinki & St. Petersburg. We are meeting my son who lives & works in India. Our daughter who was diagnosed with Myeloma in 2012 at the age of 32 is also going. This is her first trip since diagnoses. One of the things she said at diagnoses was that she wouldn’t be able to travel anymore. I’m out to prove her wrong. We have discussed that she has to go at her own pace. The excursions are no more than 4 hours long & do not involve walking tours.
    I’m being paranoid & have packed Lysol wipes to wipe down the cabin. Now my son is coming on a plane from Dubai & the news over here is all about the MERS virus which has traveled to the US from the Middle East.
    We will take our precautions, pace ourselves slowly in our adventures & best of all enjoy the 4 of us being together. We can’t let the Myeloma win by curtailing our lives.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: