The Cancer Dentist

These days I rarely learn anything new about myeloma. For preservation purposes, I tend to avoid reading about occasional medication advancements. I prefer ignorance on that subject for it does not assist my day to day. Such ignorance means that there really are few days in which I can learn or experience anything new about the wonder that is myeloma. My current treatment can quite easily be described as monotonous, and thus most days, I feel I have encountered everything this stage of My Myeloma can throw at me. Even the unpredictable delays and detours no longer surprise me. It’s an old hat. A black, old, slightly smelly, definitely frayed, hat.

On Monday of this week, as you may have guessed, I did experience something new. Be warned, this does not mean it was interesting (it was not), so feel free to skip to the end. Interesting or not, new is new, and I have been talking about it ever since. It beats me describing how I felt when I had a cannula put in on the same day, which is exactly how I felt 18 months ago and how I have felt almost every time I have had one since. There are only so many times you can spin the same tale, or else one risks becoming as monotonous as the treatment.

In case you wanted to know, the cannula on Monday stung for a few seconds as the nurse inserted the tube into my right hand. I like to use the right hand for cannulas because the left veins are sucked dry more often for blood. The sting was followed by the word I utter without fail, after a successful insertion: ‘blood’. It is a word that denotes relief that further prodding is not necessary. As soon as the tube was removed the bruise appeared and it remains still, or as I view it; the unmistakable mark of illness…. That is the end of that tale of my normality. I do love digression. I do love repetition.

Monday’s appointment came about because I have been experiencing an occasional pain in my jaw, and it was decided that the first step of investigation into the cause would be a trip to a dentist. The dentist in question, would be what I have been calling, the Cancer Dentist. No normal dentist for me. Exercising caution is key.

Did you know that having cancer treatment can make a trip to the dentist a dangerous thing to do? The reasons were explained to me, but my appointment was four days ago and many of them, especially the reasons with scientific jargon, have since left my brain. In a unspecified nutshell, there is an extra risk of infection for us types due to there always being an extra risk of infection. That is pretty standard, but for those with myeloma, the administration of bone juice adds a further complication. Although bone juice helps me elsewhere, there is a chance that if I were to have a tooth removed, it would cause more damage to my jaw and prevent recovery. I recall something being said about ‘flaking bone’. Nobody wants unwanted bone in their mouth.

Drugs do so much more to the body than you think they do. Apparently, I will have to give any dentist a full list of my medication should I decide not to be lazy and I must make sure that O give specific mention to the bone juice. I was told that I would have to mention the Zometa up to ten years after I last received it. That my friends, is an optimistic thought.

The moral of the story, if you have skipped straight to the bottom, is that when you are with cancer, take extra super duper care of your teeth. In the paraphrased words of the the Cancer Dentist, fixing problems in the mouth with everything else going on is difficult, almost dangerous. Prevention is key. Heeding her advice, and I have only been too tired to brush my teeth two times since the appointment. That, is called progress.

I told you this was an exciting blog.

I should probably mention what was wrong with my mouth huh? After finally admitting a problem when I could not wrap my jaws around a bratwurst, two appointments and an x-ray of the jaw via A&E, I got the the diagnosis. Do you know what was wrong with my jaw? Absolutely nothing. By ‘absolutely nothing’, what I mean is, nothing cancer related. I did not think that was even a possibility in this day in age. In fact, my jaw ache is something many normal people suffer from; the teeth grind. How tame. I almost feel like a wuss for one day, it even prevented me from eating a cherry tomato.

Okay, there was something else said at the appointment, something far more serious, but I fear you will judge me… I have a build up of plaque around my molars. It’s not like anybody can seem them. Worse than that, at the ripe old age of 30, I was given a lesson in how to brush my teeth.

So there you have it. It may have been new, but my oh my, was it boring.

I should add, to make this blog even longer, that even though I do not know how to brush my teeth, I have never had a filling… I do still have myeloma though.

EJB x

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One thought on “The Cancer Dentist

  1. Chris Wakefield says:

    I was in tears on your behalf after reading your article in Myeloma Matters. It just brought everything back to me. March 2012, bad back, agonising pain, analgesics no good, GP says no point in a referral etc. 4 weeks later, having been sick in brand new car as a result of pain killers, next door neighbour (orthopaedic surgeon) says this is no good, must be another cause, arranges X-ray for me on Easter Monday. Within 2 days MM diagnosed and treatment starts. GP apologises and says he has learned a lesson. I gave the surgery a bundle of the handouts that Myeloma UK has prepared for GP’s.

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