Mashed

Hello there and welcome to Part I of, let’s say, two blogs about my brain function. I assume it’ll be in two parts; I have not written them yet.

The first post will be something of a downer as I describe what it is like to exist with constant Chemo Brain. As a romcom sort of girl however, I intend to pick things back up in Part II with an inspirational story of how I manage to fine some respite from my brain’s drug induced default position of blurry shapes.

So, back to the downer that is Part I…

I need to be clear about something that is commonly misunderstood. Fatigue as I know it now, is not just limited to tiredness. Of course tiredness is a big part of it, but there is so much more to it. So much more that is hidden from your view.

Essentially, my brain is straining and I know it is straining. In the last two months, as my fatigue has increased, so too has my inability to concentrate, think, remember and reason. Don’t get me wrong, I am not sitting at home all day long unable to tie my shoe laces. That’s a bad example, for I actually cannot do up my show laces, but that is not because I do not know how, it’s because my back forbids it. My recent days and weeks mostly blur into one big lump, where time passes quickly, with a noticeable lack of cognitive brain function and imagination. My time passes quickly and yet I do not know how, nor can I recall any use of something I once knew as ‘imagination’. I miss it.

This blog is a good example of my inability to think. When this all started, as much as I noticed that the drugs were frying my brain, I could still form sentences that did not always include ‘of course’, ‘so’ and ‘obviously’. Writing was easy. It’s not easy for me now. I like to think that I am rather witty, but realistically, after a glance through my most recent posts, my wit may well be in my past.

Believing something is better than nothing, I will continue to stick to the same old vocabulary to keep people abreast of My Myeloma developments, even though I know the content is becoming dryer than my skin post radiotherapy. I sit down to write a blog and more often than not, a blankness takes over and what I want to say cannot be said because the words just bounces around my head. If I can overcome that particular hurdle, I then find that the act of writing things down, something that remains important to my overall wellbeing, uses up my daily thought allowance. I blame this for my current, simmering level of madness. That is my story and I am sticking to it.

Waking up one day and realising that your ability to communicate is not what it once was, is not something to relish nor welcome.

After some thought, I still view my treatment as a means to an end, but the truth is, my treatment comes at a big cost that few people recognise and I can quantify. All I know for certain is that I cannot help my boringness, I plead with thee.

I watched a film last weekend, I will not tell you the name of it because I am about to give away a big part of the plot. One of the characters is accused of running somebody over with his car and his defence is that he cannot remember doing it. Why you wonder? The answer is Chemo Brain. An actor playing a doctor actually says ‘Chemo Brain’. Now, I have no intention of running somebody over in a car, I cannot look at my blind spot anyway, but it made me think, slowly, about the losses I have had to deal with on my current treatment… I do not think that the plot development I mentioned is implausible.

I am backing this blog up with examples, silly examples maybe, but examples all the same, so that you do not think I am exaggerating or feeling overly maudlin. When I say that my days blur into one, and that I have a limited concept of time, that is not an exaggeration. Big Sister told me off a few days ago because I had not spoken to her for a week. If somebody had asked me about this prior to our conversation, I would have said that the last time we spoke was a mere few days before the question came ‘where have you been?’. The answer of course to that question was ‘I don’t know’.

Last Monday, I attended a two hour lecture on the Freudian concepts of Eros and Thanatos in modern cinema. Cultural for sure. The following day, I knew that Thanatos meant death, but I could not remember the word. I had to look it up five times before it stuck and by Wednesday I had forgotten the word again. Right now, if I think really hard, I can remember the titles of three of the six films discussed.

I used to have a good short term memory. Past tense. My brain now seems to be built for one man shows because I cannot remember multiple names in one go. A few weeks ago I watched a film in the afternoon and come 20:00hrs, I had no recollection of what the film was. In my defence, the film was terrible.

If modern technology did not exist, if I did not walk around with constant access to Google in my pocket, I would be a word beginning with ‘f’ and ending in ‘d’. I am constantly making notes and scrolling through my messages to see what I have said to the various people in my life. I live in a constant state of fear that all my conversations are the same and people are just too polite to tell me that we have already spoken about what it is we are speaking about the last time we spoke.

There is an obvious side effect to the side effect of which I speak. It’s called monotony. Do you know what monotony does? It makes a person boring. Dare I say it, it makes a person tedious. My worry? It has made me tedious. Of course, nobody will say that I am a god awful bore, at least not to my face, but they can and will think it. My phone records would probably back this up.

A month ago a friend of mine told me off for asking so many questions in conversation. It plagued me for a week or so, until I realised that it is something I do now to firstly enable me to actively participate in a conversation. Secondly, having thought about and asked a question, I am more likely to remember the answer. It is a far from ideal way of engaging.

It has, in my brief myeloma voyage, never been as severe for such a long period of time. Reading has been a constant difficultly and the chances of following the plot of Game of Thrones were significantly reduced the first day I took morphine, but there is so much more to it now. I want to be able to articulate myself. I want to remember to reply to messages and phone calls. To allow the former, I would be greatly assisted in knowing how long a day is. And finally, I would very much enjoy recalling information mid conversation without feeling the need for a celebratory fist pump.

As Part I draws to a close and on the eve of two transplants, my main questions are, how much worse can it get and how many people will still be around at the end of it?

EJB x

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