Best Laid Plans

When I eventually wake up today, the first thought I am going to have, after the one we all have first thing in the morning about emptying our bladders, will be ’16 days’. I know I will have this thought because I have had the same sort of numerically decreasing thought every other morning for the fortnight. It’s a countdown.  All being well, it is going to continue to decrease until I get to ‘zero’ and then I will find myself at what I have just decided will be called ‘Lift Off’.

I have been with this once,  silent countdown since 2 March and I have known of the less time bound specific transplant plans for slightly longer that that, but in the age of uncertainty and limited brain capacity, I have been quite loathe to write them down and explain it all. Since I only have a measly 16 days left to wait now, 16 days in which I imagine that my emotions are going to be here, there, under the stair and quite possibly anywhere else I can imagine, I thought it is high time for me to share this information with you.  The information of course, is also commonly known as a ‘Plan’. The Best Laid Plan. A lot can happen in 16 days. Coughs and sneezes spread diseases and all that, so, do understand my disclaimer. 

It has been quite a while since I did my MS Project training and I wager that I am in a minority of the population who have undertaken MS Project training, so my plan will only be presented to you in the form of words and potentially, the odd bullet point. Anyway, WordPress is not Microsoft Office, so I should just continue.

πŸ“‹πŸ“‹πŸ“‹

I am having two transplants, you could say that they are going to be ‘back to back’, but that would depend on your definition of ‘back to back’ now wouldn’t it? Since my visit to St Bart’s on 11 February, during which I was bombarded with so much donor transplant related information that I had to take a 10 hour nap, I have slowly been trying to get my head around the implications of their plans for me. For your information, based on my discussions with the Medically Trained People, ‘back to back’ means a three or four month gap between transplants. Subject to the outcome of the first transplant. 

A month since my appointment at St Bart’s Hospital and I am none the wiser about whether what I was told was expected by me or not. I was told that I was going to suffer from severe fatigue post donor transplant for an undisclosed, but probably a long, period of time. I was also told that they will want me to have a little of something called ‘Graft vs Host Disease’, but not a lot of it, because if I get too much of it, the result could be worse than My Myeloma itself. Read from that sentence what you wish, but I have a full bottle of water next to me, so I am hopeful. To cut a long story short in terms of the graft and my host, they want me to get some rashes. Sexy. 

There are three possible outcomes to the procedure (they negated to mention a negative fourth outcome and so I will do the same). The first outcomeis a quick relapse, the second is a long period of remission and the third is a cure. They do not know which door I will get, and my, my, my, is that like, The Most Exciting Game Ever.

Prior to the appointment, I knew all of this information. That said, there is quite a difference between knowing it by piecing information together from various conversations and leaflets in isolation, to one Medically Trained Person confirm it all to my rash free face. 

What I did not know and what came as surprise to me way back on 11 February, is that I will not behaving a full allogeneic transplant. I will be receiving Big Sister’s stem cells in all their maroon coloured glory, but I will do so without any high doses of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. I will in fact be having what the Medically Trained People at St Bart’s call, ‘a Mini-Allo’.

There is a 50:50 chance that the mini-Allo procedure could be administered to me as an outpatient. News I welcomed with pleasure and a mental image of my television screen. On the downside, I feared this news might confuse my people over the severity of and longevity resulting from the procedure I will be having. I was told that whilst doing it this way removes some of the immediate risk that comes with high dose treatment and a severe lack of neutrophils, everything I will face in recovery is the same as if I were to have had a ‘full’ transplant.

Enough of that. That is my main course, which I will apparently be hungry for at the end of June or beginning of July. Plenty of time in my future to go through the minutiae. Plenty of time. For now,  I have my starter to contend with, which is provisionally booked in for the 1 April. Saying I am concerned about my next transplant would be an understatement. Unlike my previous autograpt, and to extend this  metaphor, I have been continuously snacking for these last eight months on various forms of chemotherapy, and so, I am not particularly hungry for more right now. I fear the overindulgence my adversely impact the proposed high dose course of Melphalan on that Wednesday, 16 days away.

As with July 2013, I have been told that I will be in hospital between 3-4 weeks.   I will be at the place where everybody knows my name, UCH and I will initially be staying in the hotel again, within the confines of Tottenham Court Road, until I become too unwell at which point I will return to quarantine in the Tower. Unlike in July 2013, I have been told that I cannot come in with painted toenails as the MTP may need to look at them. They did not need to look at them last time, and if memory serves I was sporting a hot red near my bunions, by I best not complain… I have other, more important things to plan for.

Having had a transplant already is a doubled edges sword. It’s both a blessing and a curse and for the life of me, I cannot decide if I am better off knowing what to expect or not… Let me tell you something for nothing, it does not make me any less scared nor emotional about doing it. 

Depending on the outcome of some tests I have tomorrow, in 16 days time I know that I am going to start a course of treatment that is going to have me clasping my stomach in pain, a pain that will last for well over a week and unrelenting.  At the same time, I am more than likely to once again, as an adult go through the embarrassment of soiling myself.  My mouth is going to become so dry due to a lack of fluids that I will have at least a week long film in and around my mouth, with cracked lips and a dagger for a swallow. My hair, my beautiful hair will once again fallout. I am going to need a lot of sleep. I will then get discharged from hospital and become reacquainted with solids and fresh air. And all the while, I will be the only person I know going through it…  Then, just about when I am starting to feel better, the main course will start  and that is something I have not tasted before. In 16 days time I will commence a course of action that leads to a plethora of unknowns.

I have purposely arranged this month, my time now, where I have a reasonable handle on my limitations, so that I can enjoy myself as much as my body will allow. It’s a crucial part of my plan. Fun is a tonic, as is completing things on lists. I suppose that, however, is another story. 

When I officially wake up today and say to myself ’16 Days’, I am telling myself that I have 16 days of freedom left before I become, well, before I become, I do not know what. I am telling myself that I have 16 days of normal left, 16 days to find the strength to get through the x number of days that will come after it, as well as the strength to manage all the other unknowns I, my family  and my friends are going to encounter.  

A Best Laid Plan

  • 11-31 March – Drug free. Attempt fun. Avoid snot.
  • 1 April – Day -1. Temporarily relocate to Tottenham Court Road, stayin in the hotel. Recieve Melphalan.
  • 2 April – Day 0. Recieve stem cells transplant. Spend the next few days waiting to get sick.
  • A Few Days Later – Be very unwell and spend several days shut in a room with little to no privacy. Await the happy news that I can be discharged.
  • Two to Three Weeks Later – Get discharged. Allow Mamma Jones to look after me until I am strong enough to put things in the microwave, which would mean I will be at the point where I am able to eat again.
  • Sometime in May – return to London Town to do some more recovering and more sleeping.
  • June/July – have the next transplant.
  • August, Autumn and December – recover. Avoid germs. Perfect drug cocktail. See signs of weight loss and hair growth. Attempt to keep personality intact, 

So there it is, the big plan. A plan that is probably as clear as it will ever be. A plan that I know all too well from past experience, is subject to change. I hope it does not change, for the simply fact that I am ready to move on now, or at least I will be in 16 days time. 

πŸ“‹πŸ“‹πŸ“‹

I will leave you with one final musing. Getting over my last transplant, the months of recovery after it was the hardest thing and I mean the sort of difficulty that is weighted in isolation, lonliness, endless broken sleep and fuzziest of fuzzy brains, hardest thing I have ever done. I am not the same person because of what I experienced in  aftermath of that transplant. And the memory of these consequences is usually my second thought after I wake up and recommence the countdown.

EJB x

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

2 thoughts on “Best Laid Plans

  1. Terri J says:

    Emma, Sounds like a good plan. I know it will be hard but you proved through all of this that you are tough. One day at a time. There are people on the Myeloma Beacon who have done this & seem to be doing well.
    The idea that you have a plan is so appealing to me. Our daughter relapsed in August & is now on a clinical trial after going through some rough times trying other treatments that did not work. This seems to be working. We are all meeting with the doctor tomorrow to see what the BIG plan is for the future.
    I wish you good luck, hope & prayers in this next step.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: