Groundhog Day

Even though I have had cancer for, like, forever, I am still required to have the occasional bone marrow biopsy. Even though I have had cancer for, like, forever, the thought of a bone marrow biopsy fills me with dread and impending doom. If in fact, one can grammatically be full of impending doom. This morning, I woke up full of impending doom because I knew that at 09:00hrs, I would be forced into lying in a fetal position to allow for a bone marrow biopsy. I had been through an almost identical day before, for today was the Pre Transplant Tests Day. 

First things first, getting up early enough to be in the hospital before 09:00hrs, was not a pleasant experience.  I actually saw commuters, the nine to fivers. What a way to make a living. Before I had reached the hospital therefore, my day had started badly for I should have been woken up by Housemate and his dog and not by my alarm clock. Alarm clocks are for healthy people and not those who take a Diazapam before bedtime. I also knew that I faced a day of a biopsy, a kidney test known as a GFR Measurement, a Cardiac Scan and lots and lots of needles.  

The biopsy was just like the others before it, summed up with one simply word ‘painful’. This one however, had added blood and I ended up bleeding all over what looked like a puppy training pad, the waistband of my jeans and a little bit of the bed. I took a photograph of the latter to prove that I am not exaggerating.



Over time, I have learnt that the pain of having somebody remove a wee bit of bone and it’s juices from my body is lessened by having a friendly face to look at, that will talk to me whilst the dreaded deed is done. Today was no different and I had the addition of said person allowing me to squeeze his hand whilst I was pulling labour like faces and wincing. It all helped.

Following that little procedure, we endured a 85 minutes wait, as I waited for the next appointment, known as the GFR Measurement. Google tells me this stands for glomerular filtration rate, which is, apparently, ‘the best test to measure your level of kidney function and determine your level of kidney disease’. In practice, the test  was a right royal faff. It required my  companion and me to go back to the Insitutue of Nuclear Medicine five times over the course of the day to allow some Medically Trained People to take my blood after they had put some sort of potion into my body. Plus, two expertly administered cannulas in each arm. Due to a desire to protect my favourite vein, I opted to have the second cannula in my left hand, which meant I spent two hours sporting what looked like a mitt on my hand. Needless to say, doing up my trousers was quite troublesome. 

The first visit involved the potion being administered along with your bog standard flush. It looked very much like the photograph below.



I then had to wait for two hours before returning to the fifth floor of the magical tower that is University College Hospital, where a Medically Trained Person took my blood. I then returned an hour later when another MTP took my blood. I then returned an hour after that when another MTP took my blood. It was like Groundhog Day, with the added bonus of blood. My blood.



The whole thing was over by 16:15hrs, so let us all keep our fingers crossed that the results show a reasonable renal function. I really need something else to boast about.

Somewhere in the middle all of that nonsense, I had the cardiac test. I think this also required some sort of potion entering my body, but there was so much going into my body, there is a chance I missed it. These days, my motto has to be ‘Just Let Them Get On With It’. 

Even though I lost track of what was going into my body (an excuse for obesity if ever I have heard one), I did not miss having to lie on a flat mental bed whilst a machine took some expensive images of my heart for 15 minutes. I was also attached to an ECG machine. I must not forget that part if you are to get a clear picture of just how exhausting my day has been. I likened the machine itself to sticking one’s breasts in an upside down photocopier for laughs. Again, I documented the experience.





As is evident from the photographs, I found the experience quite sensual, what with the Velcro straps and all. It was sensual right up until the point when I had to sit up, when it became masochistic, well, if I enjoyed it. I did not. My back, along with the small hole in it, definitely did not enjoy the process of sitting up. I also did not enjoy the reminder that I still, after all this time and treatment, cannot lie on a flat mental surface and resurface without experiencing pain.

That was my day. Not all of it you understand, we need some secrets, but it pretty much covers what happened between the hours of 08:00 and 17:00. It was all too, too much for me and at 19:00hrs, I can confirm that I am in need and indeed, in my bed.

It would be most remiss of me not to mention that my day would have been nigh on impossible had I not had somebody to share the experience with me, hold my hand when I needed him to and who entertained me between blood samples. Indeed, his day, selflessly started before mine did, as he arrived at my house before my departure and accompanied home once it was all done. Even though I am tired and my back feels, as the the late and very great Mr Griffiths would say  like it has been kicked by a horse, I have a warm and somewhat fuzzy feeling in my stomach. I take this as both fondness and gratitude. Of course, it could just be because  we discovered the quiet solitude of Cancer Centre’s roof garden and not because my friend did something very nice for me. It’s hard to tell, I am full of unknown potions.





Now, let us all hope that this was worth it and in 15 days time, I’ll be on the verge of shitting my pants.

EJB x

Annex A: I ❤️ the NHS. You may be interested to know that during my day, I was treated by two nurses, four nursing assistants/technicians and saw two receptionists, not to mention the other people I saw and spoke to along the way. My tests also need to go somewhere once they are done and I there are several, faceless people behind the scenes including the people who will process my blood samples, contributing towards my wellbeing. What a service! It makes me quite proud. Also, those people in the labs, testing our bloods, always need a little shout out. 

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One thought on “Groundhog Day

  1. Tj13 says:

    Spent a day like yours with my daughter today. She is doing a clinical trial at hospital of university of Pennsylvania, usa. We spent 9 hours there, mostly blood work every hour. It was worth it because at the end of the day they told us her myeloma numbers were reduced greatly. I’m exhausted & I didn’t even do anything but keep her company.

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