Something Borrowed

I am often being told that My Myeloma is not all my own. It would be correct to say that my illness is not all about me, the people around me have suffered effects of the illness just as I have; they’ve metaphorically and actually held my hand, they have lost a drinking mate, they put up with me and fained interest in me describing in minute detail what I have cooked on any given day, they have dealt with my mood swings and there are many, many more things that are too long to list here. 

Very soon (with my fingers crossed), somebody is going to be physically affected by My Myeloma. I will be borrowing something quite exceptional from my Big Sister. It’s beyond exceptional. It’s a minor miracle.  Just as this will be a new experience for me and a potential lifeline, it is a brand new experience for her. I’m not even sure if the word ‘experience’ encompasses the enormity of what she is about to do. I really isn’t just about me anymore…

Two weeks ago, Big Sister travelled to London for her pre transplant tests. From this, among other things, we learned that it is not only me who has to wait around a hospital.
And so, without further waffle, for one time only, I give you Big Sister:

I had known for 33 months that I was a match for my sister and that I carried round her magic medicine and possible cure. Just a few days after Emma’s diagnosis, my tissue was tested to see if I was a match. There was only a 25% chance that I would be, so we were all thrilled when it was confirmed I was a 10/10 match. I can still remember everything about the call from the hospital telling me this, and my phone call to Emma to tell her.

It’s been quite a responsibility carrying the stem cells around, if I had had my way they would have been taken as soon as we knew I was a match. I even carry around an ICE card in the event of an accident which states I am a living donor and they meant let me die until my stem cells have been harvested.

A few months ago, we were told I would need a medical before I donated. After months of asking, my medical for stem cell donation was arranged for the 11 June. I was anxious to say the least. What if, after all this time, Emma’s own stem cell transplants and our hopes, I couldn’t donate?
I caught the 7:21 train to London, sat in my reserved seat and tried to revise for my upcoming exams. Instead, all I could do was listen to the moron diagonally opposite me, try desperately hard to make conversation with the barrister next to him. Among the many conversation starters he came up with was ‘we all have cancer you know?’ I sat there wondering if I should say anything about his rather random and insensitive comment; in the end I figured my thoughts would be wasted as he was a proper know all. 
I hopped out the train and grabbed a taxi to St Barts. I was there a few minutes before my appointment. I was weighed and measured and then sent to see a consultant. The consultant was nice and cheery, he told me a load of things I already knew and completed a questionnaire about my health. I signed a consent form, the same one I give women at the hospital I am training at, before they have a caesarean, except this time ‘donate stem cells’ was written in the blank space.
Next, I went to meet my CNS, my very own CNS, how about that? She talked to me about dates, and we agreed that the harvest would start on the 22 July. I assumed this meant I had passed the medical, although no one said. My CNS then sent me for an ECG, and some blood tests.
I wandered round the huge hospital to where I was told I would get my ECG, only to be told the department had recently moved and I now needed to be at the other end of the hospital….so off I went. I was called in immediately, it took about 5 minutes to stick on all the sensor thingies and then just a minute to do the trace. I was handed the trace and told to take it back to the CNS. I was a bit reluctant to hand the ECG trace over before I knew it was ok, so I quickly Googled what a good trace looked like. Mine was similar, what a relief, so I handed it over.
Next it was time to take ‘some’ blood samples. Off I went, back to the main building and up to the 6th floor. I went and sat in a bay where other people were having chemo. A nurse came and started taking out the empty sample bottles. Now I am not going to lie, I hate needles, I always have and always will. Trying desperately hard not to embarrass myself in front of these poorly people that have to under go needles frequently, I let her take my blood…..all 16 bottles.

  
Finally, I was sent to the pharmacy to get my G-CSF injections. I waited over an hour, but they never appeared. It turns out that the prescription was wrong. As a result, I couldn’t meet Emma for lunch and Emma will now need to collect my injections for me at some point.

A week or so later, I had a text from my CNS to say all my blood tests were ok. The next day, I received a letter in the post from St Barts. My heart pounded a bit as I opened it, luckily it was a confirmation to my GP that I was suitable to donate, requesting they do check up on me following the harvest.

  
So after all that, and after 33 months, on the 18 July, I will start to inject myself with G-CSF, the growth hormone to make more stem cells. I’m not entirely sure how I will do this, but I will cross that bridge at the time. On the 21 July, I will go to St Barts for my pre-op tests. On the 22 July, I will have my stem cells harvested. They will be cleaned up and given straight to Emma. 
It all sounds quite simple. If simple means needles, stem cells and giving your little sister a lifeline. 

Can it really, finally, be happening?

EJB x




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