Monthly Archives: July 2015

Admission

By the time Wednesday morning   came, when I walked onto daycare ward 7A late at 11:15hrs with my suitcase and rucksack , I had spent my morning psyching myself up for my inevitable admittance to the hospital. I  snuggled my goodbyes with Bruce  and then immediately coated myself in antiseptic before doing it again because I still wasn’t quite prepared to not see his face for a few weeks. I even forced myself to watch some daytime TV tripe whilst reading the news on my phone as Bruce breathed into the back of my neck,  because I evidentially have a borderline unhealthy relationship with a dog. “What do you miss most from home Emma, your…?” “Bruce”, in a heartbeat. It was a shame that conversation was with a nursing assistant who took ‘Bruce’ to mean my “handsome husband.” 

 So, yes, it was 11:15hrs and I knew I was ready to go into hospital.

I was ready to go in, but I was not happy about it. I had to employ a fair amount of common sense to the scenario to be ready and argue against myself. Lest not forget that I had been told I was having an outpatient procedure with the chances of admittance being 50-70%. Almost as soon as I stepped into Daycare, seven days earlier, I was told that my admittance was an inevitability.  “As soon as your neutrophils reach 0.5 or below; it’s our policy”, one Medically Trained Person would say or “you have to be in the hostel!”. One Doctor simply said that I was down to do it as an outpatient, so we should try to do it as an outpatient.  No more, no less. He made sense to me. Sort of. So, when he said to me on Wednesday that despite having no fever, cold or flu type symptoms, he was recommending for me to be admitted to the hospital, I did not have the energy to reason back why I should have stayed out.

I can reason about it now of course. My admittance on Wednesday was partly based on a Medically Trained Person’s assessment from the previous day that I was “struggling”, with the then current arrangements. A struggle that could quickly become  a ‘routine’ but for a few simple changes made to the outpatient programme. For example, said patients could see the doctors at roughly the same time they have their bloods taken each day. Maybe they do not need to see a doctor everyday? The blood tests could be taken at the same time everyday to avoid the the need to wait and fill a collection box worth of the stuff before it is deemed financially viable for the lab to run the requested tests.  The biggest adjustment would allow for the patient, once they gave been seen and they require no other treatment that day, to go home. Having to be seen by a nursing assistant, a nurse (usually a sister) and a doctor, daily,  one could theoretically go home before the daily blood results come back in, on the agreement that you would come back if the bloods dictated a need to do so.  In the week I was there, nothing changed in the four hours it took to get my bloods back other than my ability to speak and my need for my bed. On some of the days, especially at the weekend, the SeniorMedically  Trained people were working to day old blood results anyway. 

Shaving off that few hours a day, could have potentially kept me out for a few days longer. The same person who said I was struggling on Tuesday, on Wednesday told me that I seemed like I had much more energy. I think getting home by 12:30hrs the previous day, in my own space had a lot to do with it, and I believe me, I said as much.

Looking tired was not the only reason for my admittance. The staff here are serious scientists and I should not go forgetting it. Some of them, I believe are caring ones at that. The move into a bed that somebody in all probabability, have probably soiled themselves on at least once,  was precautionary measure, I might not have any bugs yet, but my bloods were on a downward pattern with my neutrophils by Wednesday falling to a level of  0.1 for two consequative days. It’s Friday today and despite asking, nobody has given me my blood results since Wednesday. 

Since my arrival at 17:30hrs on Wednesday Night, all I have wanted to do was to sleep and  poop. Sleep and poop. It’s not too much information, it is the painstaking truth, of wanting to not pass out when you stand up sort of pain. Fortunately after six long days, my Movicol kicked in this morning and I sang my Hallelujahs. 

Sleep is harder to quantify. Yesterday I persistently wanted to vomit, which prevented me from an interrupted sleep but it was an abuse that could only be cured by sleep.  I could have easily of slept all day and  I slept all night AND done the same today. I am probably not long off it today. 

I fear that  my admittance, my admittance, to my very own side room no less, is a fraud. Is there a reality show where the winner gets their own room if they are the sickest? I know I am neutropenic, but I knew that it was okay on Tuesday night when I was fine in my own home. My bloods have  flatlined before, in April and I did not get a bug then, I was fine. History could repeat itself. Accept, I wasn’t really fine on Tuesday. I could stay out because I had other people to look after me. No amount of planning ahead made it any easier for me to heat up a frozen baked potato. Big Sister had driven down earlier that day to feed me and repack my hospital bag. Over the weekend, Mamma Jones did pretty much everything for me. I could have stayed at home if I had 24 hour care for an unknown amount of time, but that just is not practical. By Wednesday morning, the short walk from the Little Britain hospital entrance to the day care ward had me gasping.

My worries about being a fraud in my own side room, with a window without curtains and a television where the channel can only changed by turning it up, were proved preposterous this morning when the simple act of getting up to brush my teeth required an hour nap afterwards. After my shower and stool, it was a two hour nap. It would appear among the many things going on inside my body, outwardly, it needs days made of sweet dreams.*

Plus, yesterday, a magical pump was put into my arm that I have to carry everywhere I go (bed and toilet), which automatically dismisses anti sickness medicine. It’s a revelation. I woke up this morning and gulped down a cup of water and I did not want to immediately vomit it back up. I wouldn’t have got that home. 

The truth is, the communication may  only be marginally better than on Daycare, but this place is still the best place for me as much as I could sit here and pick apart all the errors in their systems. What errors you ask? Well, despite my need for twice daily morphine  being one of the first things I mentioned to the ward nurse on Wednesday, who by the way told me off for saying that my back problems were myeloma related and scolded me for not informing her that I was Day+6 post mini allo. On the latter point I just looked dumbfounded and said that I thought that information was a given . I’ll let you into secret,  MST is  a medication I care about a lot, so much so in fact that in the two days I have been here I have  also mentioned it to the pharmacist, the chief ward nurse, every doctor I have seen and any nurse who has given me any drug, and yet they are still claiming I have never been prescribed MST by this hospital. Thank goodness for my secret stash and my own toilet. A communal bathroom just would not be fair on anybody else.

EJB x
* if sweet dreams can be achieved with a minimum of one interruption every four hours, but we all know it is more. I have seen one friend today, five nurses, three nursing assistants, a doctor, two cleaners and one tea lady. At least I think I have.

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Made Up

Lipstick brings joy to my face. Foundation, a  splash of Touché Éclat, a sheer eyeshadow, a bit of eyeliner, a tot of mascara and little something something on my checks, apparently brings the life to my face.

Making sure I wear lipstick has been a cardinal rule of mine since My Myeloma began. The only times it has been broken, if you exclude the morning run to the shop, has been during periods of hospital admittance, days of the steroid crash and during Transplant Number 1 The Second when I felt it would be inappropriate to whack on some matte lipstick for a 0.2 mile walk.  I’m no Gwen Stefani. At that time, I also stopped wearing make up because I just found it became too cumbersome, when I was only leaving my bed for 30 minutes a day and lifting a blusher brush felt like I was bench pressing whatever is considered a heavy weight to bench press.

I do not know what I envisaged for my appearance during Transplant Number 2.  Comfort would be key of course and the outfit would have to be put together to allow for easy access to my PICC line and the minimal bearing of the arse crack. Next to that, because I knew I would be sitting on a bed for much of the day needing comfort, on a cancer ward, I concluded that wearing a wig would be unnessary. I originally wrote ‘redundant’, but that is very unfair for all those people, who I once was, who  wear their wigs for themselves. As for the rest,  my vanity must not have as much hold of a over me as I once thought it did, because I really did not give my hospital appearance and attire  any thoughts other than the  practical ones I mentioned above.

Well… that was until people started telling me I looked ‘unwell’. Or ‘tired’. Or ‘tired AND unwell’. Or when they avoided all niceties at all and said I look ‘awful’.

Why I wondered? Why in a matter of days had I gone from looking non descript, I had a ‘great’ on 10 July, to an ‘awful’? The answer, I pondered, has something to do make up. I stopped wearing the stuff at some point over the weekend when I forgot what which one was my right hand. In truth, I should have stopped wearing it a few days before that when I dropped the Chanel Blusher in the dog’s bed.

It begs the question, did the chicken come before the egg? Did I look awful when I stopped having the energy to put my make up on, or did I look awful because I did not have the energy to put make up on? Do I look tired because my neutrophils have dropped from 3.3 to <0.1 in a week or do I look tired because I stopped wearing my make up? 

I imagine it is a combination of the two, but I am certain that a man  going through what I am, would not have experienced such a vocal change in perception about his appearance to the extent I did,  just because I happened to stop wearing make up at the same time I started to go downhill. I asked Mamma Jones about this today and she cannot be objective as a mother and just said that I ‘looked like me.’

Two days ago, despite assuring a Medically Trained Person that I felt exactly how I had, for better or for worse, for the previous few days, I was referred to a Senior Medically Trained Person because I looked like I was ‘struggling’. I think this translates to I had some eye bags. Yesterday, a nurse who had not seen me for since Friday told me that I looked ‘worse’. Would I have looked better if my eyes were brightened by mascara? Was it worth me even asking? 

Would I be in my own bed now if my physical appearance hadn’t ‘deteriorated’? I am still eating, drinking and temperature free. Would the need for this current precaution had been less pronounced if I had been able to put a bit of effort into my appearance? 

Is wearing make up as a young female cancer outpatient and looking ‘normal’ an expected pre-requisitite to make the other patients’ and the staff’s day more palatable? I am certainly more comfortable when I can give my face  the time it needs.

Are all the make brands and their advertisers correct? Do women look better with make up on? Do I look better with make up on? I have been financially unable to purchase a daily ointment from MAC since Christmas and my cheekbones have felt positively non-existence since. I am used to be being told that I ‘look good considering’ and there is the frequent surprise of ‘you don’t look ill’. Complements I would not have, if I were to lay my face bare with it’s menopausal skin and hair, blotches and wrinkles.

Has putting the brush down been too much of a shock? Inwardly, over the last week I have felt grey, sunken, like no part of me has any definition whatsoever and I am in dire need of fluids. Was my war paint shielding others from this struggle? No about of make up could beauty up my blood results, nor could it stop me from wanting to sleep in the Day Clinic.  Using the term ‘decision’ loosely, but how much was my decision to stop wearing make up until I felt able to apply it better than my three year old niece the removal of a mask?  And how much of that decision made me look worse than I feel? 

Most importantly, I always considered myself something of a light make up abuser, but given recent comments, just how much have I been wearing? 

💅🏼💋💄

EJB x

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Definitely Not Normal

There is nothing more anticlimactic than the word ‘transplant’ prefixed by the words ‘bone marrow’ or ‘stem cell’. Having experienced two SCT’s before, I knew this time round was not going to start with good looking people wearing scrubs shouting “stat”, whilst sporting my blood all over their latex gloves. My loved ones were not going to be waiting patiently for news in a reception area and it would appear the only soundtrack thus far comes from Julie Andrews. My allogenic transplant has looked nothing if not boring. I am convinced that the optional removal of a bunion would have looked more exciting than what we experienced up to and including on Thursday.

I’m poised for drama, but I do not know what that drama is going to look like yet, or when it is really going to begin, so in the meantime, I will share a few photographs of how Medically Trained People have made the extraordinary, appear somewhat ordinary.
Harvest

   

    
 
Day Zero The First

   

   
   

   

Day Zero The Second

Many people, included I, am surprised by fact that the stem cells are not tested where they are harvested at St Bart’s. Instead, on each Day Zero after Big Sister had been drained and her pins were with needles, her stem cells were couriered to The Royal Free Hospital, some five miles away for testing. They would then travel back by courier, before entering me. It seems a strange world we live in that my sister’s bodily fluids could have visited the magical place known as Whitechapel without their maker being present. 

The cells were taken away in branded picnic bags. On the second day, Big Sister and I showed far too much excitement towards the courier returning our precious goods  when unfortunately for him, he came across the two of us in a lift. We squealed (because it meant I would be home by 20:00hrs) and he looked at us like we were at the wrong hospital. I captured the moment. 

  
Waiting

  

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Drooping

I have literally spent months, maybe even a year willing for something to change in my treatment, so that I had something interesting to blog about. I have a lot that keeps me awake at nights, but I still managed to squeeze in the worry that the monotony of daily cancer care would drive people away. Fast forward to my allograft and I have something new to say almost on the hour. Everything seems like it is new and I am in a state of flux. The problem? Nothing is keeping me awake at night. Very little is keeping me awake in the daytime. My treatment and this experience seems to be moving at such a rate that I do no have the time and I definitely do not have the energy to tell you about it all.

The headline is simple, I have had my transplant. Unlike the original plan, I had not one but two Day Zeros because Big Sister did not produce enough stem cells on the first day. I am far too tired to have body issues at present, which is for the best, because more than one Medically Trained Person told me that the reason for the two day transplant was my sister’s significantly smaller body size.

I just asked Mamma Jones to confirm how many cells I should have had over how many cells I actually had, and I felt like her answer lacked conviction. All you need to know is that I was only marginally short on Day Zero The First, and by close of play on Day Zero The Second, I had had more stem cells than originally intended. 

I now very much want to be a watched pot. I am being monitored so intently, that hopefully, my body will never have the chance to boil… I keep imagining that one day I will wake up and have enough energy to reply to my messages and blog about my experience to do date. If that day doesn’t come, let me tell you that this watching schedule is intense, with absolutely no room for respite. 

Going into this transplant, I was told that it was easy when compared to what I have already experienced over the last three years. I think the word ‘easy’, was a white lie. What I am doing, what I am having to do everyday without a day off is exhausting. Two years ago, I was stuck on a ward on UCH with green coming out every orifice; that was hard. Today, I do not have green coming out every orifice, but it is my 10th day of travelling into Bart’s for blood tests, forgoing rest and questioning the real purpose of showering. On Thursday, utterly dejected, I sat at the foot of Big Sister’s Harvest Bed and declared that I had never felt as ill as I did in that moment. 

If I could, I would sleep all day long. I just paused to see if I could have a few waking hours and truly the answer is no, I could sleep all day long. Yesterday, my neutrophils dropped to 0.6, so we are anticipating being told that I have to go into the hospital today. Exhaustion doesn’t cover what I feel. I am drained and I am fairly certain were it not for people putting food and drink in front of me, I would consume neither.

As for St Bart’s itself, I cannot be kind. There has been mistake after mistake, some I think are potentially serious. On average, I have been sitting in the patient bays for 5-8 hours a day and the fact that it is not only me feeling let down by the service is of some comfort. Individually, some of the Medically Trained People are lovely and I’d like to see Jeremy Hunt work the 10 day week plus on call one of my doctors just worked, but collectively, it’s disjointed. 

I keep reminding myself that I am a pragmatist and the only new age things I believe in are my Mindfulness Colouring In Books, for if I believed in more, I know I would get bogged down on how the ward has made me feel and to what detriment that has had to my overall treatment. It’s a blog in it’s own right, but when I questioned whether I would still be standing if St Bart’s had been my hospital from the start of my treatment, I think that really says something about my perception of their care. 

Now, Mamma Jones has to read this to see if it makes any sense and I am going to close my eyes to see if I can shake off this headache I have had for the last 48 hours. I am not allowed paracetamol anymore. Or suppositories, but that is another medical issue entirely. Bloody neutropenia.

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Rallying

Yesterday marked the end of five days of pre transplant conditioning. That would be, five whole days of travelling to and from St Bart’s for chemotherapy. Since the fist clenching, swear word swallowing experience of Day One’ (Day-6), I have endeavoured to be on my best behaviour when on the ward, experiencing the medical equivalent of seeing Wagner’s longest work without subtitles with an innate hatred of opera. 

I concluded that if I cannot always  service with a smile, I should be the one delivering said smile. It is something that is much easily willed than done, especially as the chemotherapy is having a negative, cumulative impact on every aspect of my body. My brain, my muscles, my bowel and my bladder feels like they have been assaulted by a BB gun and multiple sacks of potatoes. Thus, finding the energy to smile, let alone speak, does not come as easily to me as it usually, all so naturally does.

I have been attempting to rally myself into a state of positivity, but for me, this last five days at least, it is not something I have been able to do all on my lonesome. I have needed assistance. Poor Mamma Jones has been on the other end of the phone wishing she was in London. I even admitted to my friends that I was in need of assistance. Assistance being in the form company to make the hours in the clinic more bearable. Assistance to remind me that this is only a temporary measure, that won’t go on forever. Special kudos has to go out to Housemate who fought through what I can only imagine was a horrific hangover on Saturday to be at the hospital for 9am, returning home at 5pm. Yesterday, he even did my dishes, which is unheard of. 

In all honesty, this cannot be done alone. Yesterday, I forgot to brush my teeth, which I am sure was a pleasure for the Medically Trained People who had to get remotely close to my face. Even with a support network, the treatment is isolating.  If I feel like this now, who the heck knows how I will feel in a few months time?

In terms of the immediate side effects,   the hiccups have been plaguing me since yesterday, and when one looks like this post chemo, imagine what I look like mid multiple jerk:

 
Today, I have a ‘day off’, but this still involves heading into the hospital for blood tests. Big Sister also arrives in the Big Smoke for her part of the process today, so it seems only fair that I meet her to express some of the inexpressable gratifitude. 

Prior to last Thursday, I was told that I would find the conditioning relatively easy in comparison to my previous treatments. I wouldn’t go out and out and call this a white lie, I just think it’s difficult to be comparative to my past experiences when my current experience is so foul.  I might have fouled myself twice in 2013, but that is no consolation when I cannot take my morning medication without vomiting or distinguish whether ‘consolation’ is the correct word to use here over ‘consolidation’. 

We all know how much I love to talk about my toilet issues, so imagine the complex situation I found myself in on Monday night, four days without passing a number 2 whilst experiencing a cystitis-like pain from the cyclophosphamide. Every effort to unleash the stool, angered the other thing. It was a pain that could only be muted by taking two diazepam to permit a long sleep. It was a temporary reprieve, for it was still an issue present upon waking, but, hey, at least I got some sleep. Last night on the other hand, my sleep was interrupted five times to pass water because of the cyclophosphamide. 

The last five days have been relentless. With an auto, it’s one day of treatment than the transplant. The horrible side effects hit you later. I will probably be thankful when what experienced in 2013 doesn’t hit me, but right now, I just really, really want a week in my bed to recover. I know I am a good few weeks away from this luxury. 

So, in the meantime, I just have to rally. Rally and remember the key words that ‘This Soon Time Pass’.

  
EJB x

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Something New

WARNING – This blog contains some straight forward, no nonsense complaining and absolutely no humour whatsoever

Yesterday was my first day of treatment for Transplant Number 2, officially known as Day-6. Yesterday, will unofficially be known as my worst experience of NHS care. Yesterday was also the day I did something I said I would never do, and it was the day I shouted at a Medically Trained Person. Twice. I am part completely ashamed of myself and part sitting in my flat, wishing I did not have to return back to that hospital today. 

I feel ungrateful and belligerent. The bottom line is that St Bartholomew’s Hospital is doing a very expensive procedure on me, that my hospital would not do. That is the bottom line. It’s a procedure I need and without it, you could all but guarantee that I would not see 2025. My brain told me this many, many times yesterday. Why should I expect any extras like a smile or good communication. The NHS is overworked and thus should they  only be expected to plan and deliver the treatment because that is all they have time for. Perhaps there is no time for niceties.  Doctors and nurses work long hours and inspect faeces, that is something worthy of everybody’s respect. I should just be thankful that they are giving me the treatment I am getting, shut up, express my gratitude and get on with it. 

That would make for a short blog though. 

I did not feel comfortable or comforted once yesterday. I felt like a nuisance. The more upset I felt, the more tired I got and the more agitated I became. I walked into that hospital feeling hopeful and left feeling deflated and weak. I exaggerate not. I got home and slept for 12 hours plus extra snoozing, how much of that was due to the chemotherapy or to my experience I do not know. I can assume that the anxiety I felt for most of the day, was not a good starting point for my treatment. 

I have spent just under three years experiencing a rather marvellous service provided by the NHS. I do not know the budget differences between the two NHS trusts, but I think I can safely assume that UCLH is also operating within tight financial constraints. UCLH often runs with delays, I know this because I have in my time experienced them many times over. Delays that would allow for a screening of  Gone With The Wind with an interval and lunch. Yesterday, I remembered with longing the five hours I once had to wait for an injection of Velcade. As annoying as that was, it was explained to me and the bad news was delivered with a smile. 

It is not fair for me to compare the two hospitals, but it is incredibly difficult not to. I do not know any better. 

When it comes to the NHS, I like to consider myself a seasoned veteran. I am no stranger to a busy ward, red tape and a strange system for dispensing medication. I know full well that I have been spoilt at UCH’s Macmillan Cancer Centre with it’s comfy red seats and foot rests. I knew that going in and I levelled my expectations appropriately.  At least, that is what I thought. 

Perhaps yesterday just wasn’t my day. Perhaps it wasn’t the hospital’s day. 

Prior to my treatment starting, I had agreed that I will have my treatment as an outpatient for as long as is possible. St Bart’s does offer an ambulatory care, which is referred to as the ‘Hostel’, something, I am told,   should not be compared to the Cotton Rooms at UCLH.  I was given the option of staying there or at home and stay at home, in my own bed, I chose. The plan is for me to come in for five days in a row for treatment. Before yesterday, my expectations on how the conditioning was going to pan out was based on my word processed itinerary. Plus an added hour or two on each day, based on my very own My Myeloma  experience.

  

Yesterday, I arrived at the hospital at 10.26hrs and left at 17.25hrs.  

Big whoop I hear you full timers say. People will have worked for longer yesterday, the people treating me will have had a longer day, but for me, that is a long day. It was a very long and frustrating day. It started promisingly, on arrival I was taken straight through reception and I was told that the order of events was as follows;

• have my bloods done

•PICC line inserted

•See doctor for final go ahead 

• Receive the chemotherapy. 

On the face of it, that is exactly what happened, minus the massive gaps of lost time in between. Massive gaps.

Am I asking for special treatment? Am I being the ‘princess’ a nurse once called me during Transplant Number 1 the First? I worry that that is how I am perceived. The complaining heifer.

It was not until after I had had my PICC line, an x-Ray and waited 75 minutes to see a doctor at 13:35hrs, that I was told that I should expect to be in the hospital for a while. When I met with the doctor at 13:35hrs, I was told that they could not prescribe my chemotherapy until they had received my full blood count results. Results that they had  yet to receive despite the blood leaving my arm at 10.30hrs. To give you a little perspective on this, it takes 15 minutes at UCH. A point I reiterated later in the afternoon along with the fact that my bloods would have been tested quicker had I gone into an A&E. An A&E is not a specialist oncology and Haemotology unit. 

Fast forward to 14.15hrs, I was informed that the chemotherapy would be ready at 15.45hrs. Exasperated, I decided to use this time to have a nap. At 16.40hrs, a nurse hooked me up to an unexplained something. Experience told me it was just a flush, but I did not know if the chemotherapy had been added to the bag. Fifteen minutes later, I discovered that it was not my chemotherapy because two nurses came along with the chemotherapy. 

I cannot begin to describe how frustrating it was not knowing how long I was going to be there for, and  the estimated times I was given not being followed. I became more and more agitated as the day went on, and I did point out during one of my rants that if somebody had told me sooner that it was going to take six hours to get the chemotherapy in me, I could have left and come back. There were several opportunities for the Medically Trained People to do so, but they did not.

The delays were bad enough, but apart from the kind ladies who put in the PICC line, every encounter with a Medically Trained Person was cold, clinical and distinctly lacking in communication. At one point, two people treating me spoke to each other in a different language. One of the nurses told me that if I was concerned about the wait, I should just be thankful that they put the PICC line in without waiting for my blood results. 

After the PICC was inserted, I was required to get an X-ray to ensure everything was tickety boo. I am familiar with an X-ray, but I was not familiar with the process of being taken into the X-ray room and being instructed to change without a curtain whilst the machine was set up. Similarly, I did not expect two women and a man to be walking around the room whilst I attempted to put my bra on after they had completed the X-ray. 

Again, do I expect too much? 

I am by no means squeamish, and as I  fully understand the need for people to be medically trained, I did not mind when I was told that the person inserting the PICC line was doing it for the first time. I did struggle with the educational narrative and corrections that came from the supervisor throughout the procedure. With every correction, I could feel the tugging and the cutting and I become increasingly aware that I had a hole in my arm with half a metre of tubing entering my body . Fortunately, I had some tools in my arsenal and towards the end, I found Julie Andrews singing ‘My Favourite Things’ in my head on repeat. And then I didn’t feel so sad. 

At some point in the middle of the day, I started to cry. I then cried a few more times. I was alone in a new hospital, where nobody knows my name and nobody seemed to have a desire to learn it. 

It was too much for me. 

Expecting a prescription that I was told would be there and was not, was too much. Explaining to the doctor that I needed one anti sickness pill and not the lesser anti sickness pill, to then be given the lesser anti sickness pill three hours later was too much. Being prescribed less laxatives than I require and asked for, was too much. Not having my questions answered about the immediate side effects of the chemotherapy (I’m talking poop) by the doctor and nurse I asked, was too much. Trying to arrange my treatment times for Saturday and Sunday and being told that they cannot be booked in more than 24 hours ahead, was too much. Asking how it will work with my daily checks after Day 0 and being told to ‘just concentrate on my chemo’, was too much. Listening to an elderly gentleman scream out in pain as a staff attempting to give him a new cannula was too much. Being told that I should have known that ‘Day One was always like this’, was too much. 

I have often said that I would never shout at a Medically Trained Person. In April, during Transplant Number 1, I saw a lady get angry with the staff in Ambulatory Care. Initially I felt angry  that she was talking to the staff that way, but when she explained that nobody had explained what was going to happen to her and that she was scared, I understood. I am at a new hospital and I do not know how things work. Yesterday I was told to sit in a seat and wait and at no point was I told in clear terms what was going to happen and how it was going to happen. There was no introduction and no explanation. I imagine that this is what boarding school feels like.

I just have to like it and lump it. God knows how many days of this I have left. 

EJB x

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Allo Allo!

Hello there, before I get things going I think we should all stop and appreciate the pun that forms the title of this blog. I am saying ‘hello’ because I have been absent from my blog of late and I am saying ‘Allo’ because I am writing to tell you all about the allogenic transplant I am about to have. Get it? If you were not a fan of a 1980s sitcom, maybe you will not have understood it immediately, but as I have now explained it to you, a pause for you to guffaw is warranted. 

👏👏🏻👏🏽👏🏿

Right then, here it goes. 

Tomorrow, two years minus one day after my first stem cell transplant and 1063 days after I was diagnosed with the glory that is Multiple Myeloma, I will start treatment for my donor transplant. One could argue that I started treatment last July for this transplant, or, that all the other treatments I have had until this point have led to this transplant, but in the interest of not over exaggerating the sitution, tomorrow the SCT treatment really starts a proper.

It has taken an age to get here, and yet, once again, it all feels like it is coming at me too thick and too fast. I have spent the last few weeks wishing I had more time to enjoy myself post April’s auto, wishing I did not have to waste my limited time and energy sorting negative things out like money and my gas bill. I also feel under prepared in almost every sense possible. The impatient part of me however, which I should add, is My Ruler, just wants to get it out of the way. I have heard all the things that could happen and could go wrong, that I  just want to see what is going to happen and what is going to go wrong.  I want to be able to tell somebody if I’ll be free in a month’s time. I would really like to know how much energy I will have in October for the London Film Festival. I want to see if I really have wasted my last few weeks of freedom fretting over my future instead of seeing my friends and visiting my nearest multiplex. I want to see if I am strong and if I will be lucky enough to to experience weight loss. Most of all, I want to see if the transplant is going to work.

I really want it to work.

I will not know the answer to any of these questions until the treatment starts. It’s not only me who does not know, the Medically Trained People don’t know either. 

Last week, I was informed on two occasions that I am currently in remission. I didn’t believe it. On the second occasion, I was told that I was in complete remission and I was the healthiest I have been since all this started. It made the dire biopsy I had the previous week and discovering that I did not secure the lid on my 24 hour urine sample all worth it. It was news that once upon a time, would face me screaming from the roof tops. For now, it is news that bodes well going forward, only because I am exactly where the seven cycles of treatment and autograft intended me to be. It is exactly where I wanted to be. 

At the very least, it proves that my body is ready to fight the next fight, even if my mind is lagging behind. 

Some people may question the point of Transplant Number 2 when I have already achieved remission. If the last 1062 days have taught me anything, My Myeloma is a stubborn little bugger and any remission I have without the transplant will not last long. I remember June 2014 well. It’s a fact of my life. No transplant, no chance of freedom.

I’m backed into a corner with my treatment. My only true option is the transplant and I know this. Despite this, a question that has been plaguing me over the last few weeks, is that even if I do manage to get a long remission with Transplant Number 2, has the damage already been done? Myeloma came along and dropped a massive bomb into my life and there are times when I feel like I am frantically grabbing at the remaining pieces and failing to retrieve them. What sort of life will I awake to in 5-6 months time? An uncertain one. I have not been able to fully celebrate my current medical position because I have bogged myself down, with sleepless nights with these questions about my future. People tell me to focus on my health and worry about the later, well, later. That is easier said than done, especially when it is me who is staring into an abyss. Sure, my health is the most important thing, but what is health without the means to have a life? 

I know that I’ll think about the above more than once as I go forward, I may even take it out on others.  I also know that tomorrow when I wake up, my job is going to be getting through the transplant. My job is going to be getting myself out of bed everyday to get to the hospital for treatment. My job is going to be looking after my body, monitoring it and doing everything I can to ensure Big Sister’s cells do what we all want them to do.

I first heard of this procedure on 20 August 2012. At the time, I was told that there was a high chance of dying from it, there was a small chance that it would cure me and it was a rare procedure to undertake. I disregarded it. It scared me, it still does. I have had many a conversation about it since and all I know now is that I am ready to take the risk. I would be ready even if the risks were as high as first told. The prospect of being able to have a few years (conservative estimate) without treatment makes my mouth water. I’m blowing bubbles with my metaphorical saliva, I’m that ready for it. 

I have to face it, my life is not what it once was, but that is a fact that will not change by not having the transplant. In all probability, my life would be worse. Like I said, that damage has been done. Taking a risk with Transplant Number 2, the cost of doing, knowing how physically and mentally difficult it is going to be for me and those around me, has to be worth it. It has to be worth it. 

I’m in this for the long haul. 

So, tomorrow morning, I will go to St Bart’s where they will put a tube in my arm that will stay for much longer than I would like. I will have the first of five doses of chemotherapy and one week from today, I will have a bone marrow transplant. 

It’s the end of this blog, but, what it is the beginning of, time will only tell.

EJB x

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