It’s Supposed To Be A Marathon Not A Sprint

The month of August is the one month where I am guarenteed to feel nostalgic about my life pre and post My Myeloma. I might have such thoughts at other times of the year, but these usually occur when I am in some sort of drug and/of fear induced melancholy. August however, is different and this August has been more so.

August marks the anniversary of my diagnosis, my Cancerversary if you will. This year it was my five years Cancerversary. Not only do I get warm and bleak feelings about my once able body in the run up to my diagnosis. I am reminded of the stats. I am reminded of the stats I was told on the 21 August that I was then quickly told to forget about. ‘Survival rate is about 10 years, but this may be different for you because of your age’. I have had other stats thrown at me in the five years since, usually at the start of each treatment and with each treatment, My Body has come up wanting. 

There are several important dates in August; admittance to UCLH on the 14th,preliminary diagnosis on the 17th, formal diagnosis on 21st, kyphoplasty on the 24th and treatment commencing on 28th; each are packed full of memories.  This summer, I have found the memories on these dates amplified. Maybe it is something about five years and the fact that anniversaries are usually celebrated in fives. Maybe it is because I have felt my current treatment fail leading to the constant whirl of long forgotten stats and the big question that is , will I make it to the next big anniversary? Try as I might, I cannot forget about this. I even struggle to schedule a brain appointment for it, so I can lock it away again until the next scheduled appointment; my usual coping mechanism.

Every year since the cement was inserted into my L4, I have had to complete a survey about my health. What is that but a ticking clock counting down to… something? This year, the Medically Trained Person at the end of the phone said to me ‘don’t worry, next year is the last year we have to do this’. I responded, quite seriously with ‘good, that gives me something to aim towards. I hope I get to speak to you next year’. 

Some people may call these thoughts unhelpful and morbid, but I call them realistic. To me, not talking about my death, doesn’t make the chance of it less so. Avoiding such talk just makes me feel more isolated than my body is currently making me. I’m do not feel in anyway ready to kick that bucket, but I am realistic to the fact that in the five years I have had myeloma, I have had three failed transplants, multiple failed treatments and two, yes TWO failed trials. Yesterday, I was informed what my aching back had been telling me for weeks, that the Daratumamab trial had failed. I was taken off it immediately, and today I shall return to my home from home of UCLH, with the hope that they can pull something else out of the hat.

I think the fact that it was August has made me hypersensitive to any changes in my body, because those changes mirrored to some extent what I felt all the way back in the Summer of 2012. August 2017 is not the first time I have been made bedbound with a sore back. The difference now is that I know what is causing my sore back now, but I do not know the extent of the whys it if the damage is permanent. Nor is it the first time I have had high calcium, as I was told I had a fortnight ago. I was admitted to hospital in 2012 with high calcium. I have a constant sense of  déjà vu, mostly concentrated in my belly of worry. The difference? I no longer have the naivety and hope I had at the end of August 2012 that carried me along for years. 

Today, I feel like my chances of survival are dwindling. 
Three weeks ago, I turned on my television to find what the BBC were billing as a second Super Saturday. I had tuned into the athletics and believe it or not, a sporting even where people are at the peak of their physical fitness reminds me that I am not. As strange as it sounds, I feel like my diagnosis and thus My Myeloma by default is intertwined with the recent history of the sport. 

During the first fortnight of August 2012, I, like most of the country was glued to the London 2012 Olympics. I was sick at this point, but I did not know why. I recall Mamma Jones telling me on Day 1 of the Olympics that I looked grey and weak. I didn’t believe her, all I knew then was that I had a never experienced pain in my back before and that my GP could not diagnose it. Whilst I was waiting for an answer, I was prescribed a pain medication that made me slur, which led to me being signed off work. Well, removed against my will  from the office. So, I got to spend a fortnight, unable to move from my sofa (it wasn’t a sofa then but a really uncomfortable futon not suitable for grown ups), watching the fittest of the fittest take each other on in a myriad of activities. My memories of this time are fond ones. The irony that I was so enthralled by a sporting event pitched as the ultimate sporting event, whilst I was physically deteriorating day by day, does not escape me. The sane feelings emerged during the Paralympics, only with these games, I had the added jealousy of hearing how these athletes had managed to overcome adversity to be there. 

By the time the next Olympics and Paralympics rolled round last year, I knew that I was once again hooked. Watching as many events as possible was akin to torture but a torture I had welcomed. The athletes wept and I wept. I wept because I felt their pain. I wept because I knew that I was long past the point of ever being able to run anywhere let alone complete  a marathon. I wept because I knew I could not jump over a hurdle and I wept because I would never being able to learn to ride a bicycle around the corner let alone a Velodrome. When the games ended, I wept because I feared that I would not be alive for the next games in 2020. A feeling based on my then trajectory and not depression.

And so, with this year’s World Athletic Chanpionships being held in London, I was engulfed with myeloma based emotions once again. They have statistics too. For all the trying and all the rules I imposed on myself, this month had me thinking about my stats.

 I cannot help to being a different person now to the person I was when I was diagnosed in 2012. 

As scary as all the stats were back then, like I said earlier, I was naive to what they meant or could mean. I thought and hoped that I was told to pay no attention because I was going to be the medical marvel who could withstand every drug thrown at me and survive. I thought remission was a distinct years plus possibility. I believed I had many days ahead of living in me.  Now, in 2017, I think the stats have been long thrown out of the window and the best I can hope for is to exist day by day and try to fit some living, when my body allows, in there too.

There are moments in time when I feel tremendous guilt in how, after just five years, I could end up here. Should I not be pre-paying for my funeral? Is getting a will a sign of giving up rather than an act of mere financial sense. I know my nearest and dearest loathe me talking about the possibility of my death, and now I fear that  these once in a blue mood chats, honest chats, have tipped my hand. I hope not, and if push came to shove, I believe not, and yet I still have moments when I feel guiltily that I may have jinxed myself. Perhaps this is how a favourite athlete feels when the bomb out in the semi finals… 

I know in regard to my treatment that I  done everything I was supposed to do. More open to discussion is how I have mentally got through the last five years, but with regularly counselling sessions and honesty, I personally believe that I have done everything in my power to not be in the medical position I am in today. I renewed my latest cinema memberships by direct debit, not for the financial benefits but because I wanted to commit to being a member next year. For all years. Last week, I spent far too much money on bedding and other soft furnishings, and I spent that amount of money because I want to believe that I will need said bedding for a long time to come. A fortnight before that, I invested in a limited edition backpack, not just because I liked it, but because I needed something of good quality for all my future visits to the hospital. I have more examples, but essentially, I do things to show I am not ready to die. 

My treatment has failed. Again. As of March, I had exhausted traditional myeloma treatments. That’s a lot to take in and let’s face it, these are odds never in my favour. That was a failed attempt to  shoehorn a film quote into my blog, the odds are not in my favour. 

I was supposed to have at least ten years; the marathon. Five years might not exactly be the 100 metre sprint, but it’s no marathon. I want the marathon.

Let’s see what is offered to me today. Who knows, I might be reinstated.

EJB x

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6 thoughts on “It’s Supposed To Be A Marathon Not A Sprint

  1. Sarah says:

    Thinking of you EJ sending lots of love ❤️Xxxxxx

  2. Tj13 says:

    I am feeling your pain. Hopefully they will come up with another drug combo for you. You have been through so much. I remember after my daughter was diagnosed they told us 7 years, she lasted 4. After her stem cell transplant we were so hopeful, I even thought this isn’t to bad if she has to live like this. She relapsed 15 months later. Many drugs were tried but none worked & they put her body in such bad condition her lungs were not strong enough to have the Allo transplant with her brother as donor. Clinical trials didn’t last for long & as a last resort they were going to try CarT cell therapy as a trial but she didn’t last long enough. Car T cell therapy has just been approved here in the USA by the FDA for leukemia. I believe in the future this may be a chance for those with Multiple Myeloma. It is a hope.
    Mama Jones USA

  3. Alex Bicknell says:

    Emma, you’re being treated at UCLH? Have they discussed the BCMA trial with you? I don’t know the details, though I know someone on it so could find out for you. It isn’t exactly the same as the CAR-T trials in the US, but its working on a similar mechanism. I know someone who had poor response to SCT and I think also failed on daratumumab who has got CR on the BCMA trial

    • ejbones says:

      I didn’t get on it. They had really strict entry requirements and because I had the flu, I was a no-no. I’m not on a trial now, but I am as good as on one. The drug (veneoclax) isn’t routinely given for Myeloma and it wasn’t initially offered to me, but so far, so good. Unfortunately, it’s a really hefty dose with no time off. I suppose needs must.

      There might be another chance to get on the trial, but many circumstances would have to align and I still do not think I am considered a good candidate. We’ll see.

  4. cpbg2016 says:

    My wife watched the Olympics at a distance; from the 17th floor of UCH as she attempted to recover from a SCT. After some 6 months, we started to have a relatively carefree time with lots of enjoyment. Then the relapse which lasted some 15 months before a trial which was grim and lasted only 3 months. Now on another trial/compassionate use.
    I feel we are keeping pace with you … let us not race or try to be atheletes but just enjoy the company of friends and relations whilst we can.
    Your words have been an inspiration to me and have helped me through periods of bleakness. I would love to know what your medical carers make of your ‘Medically Trained Persons’. The people at UCH have all been so good to my wife except for the bone marrow biopsies. Not sure if another one will be allowed!

  5. 4windsfl says:

    I was glad to read you are still with us, Emma, and I know the struggle of being hopeful you will ‘last the distance’ weighs on you. You provide much encouragement to those newly diagnosed and for those who are teetering on trials that may or may not work. I am cheering you onward…

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