Category Archives: Drugs

10 Hours In London

Following my latest Bad News Day, I’m not sure if we can classify it as the Ultimate Bad News Day, but after whatever a fortnight ago was, things started to happen very quickly. Last Friday evening, when I had a chance to stop, I reflected that I could not believe so much had happened in a simple space of a week. As you can assume, it was a riveting conversation. A lot happened that week, but for this blog, I am only going to tell you about what happened on Monday 3 April. Firstly, it means you’ll have to read the following blogs and secondly, I enjoy the WordPress alerts that say ‘your stats are booming’. Well done, all 100 of you. I deserve more than 100 of you, but again, that’s not the purpose of this blog.

Mamma Jones and I departed Peterborough on the 10.08 train that day for an appointment at St Bartholomew’s Hospital at midday. At this point in time, I was not entirely sure why I was going to Bart’s. The last I heard was that I may have got into a trial at the hospital and I was going there to talk about it. Initially, I had thought that this appointment would take place a week later, but the hospital wanted me in as soon as possible and when you are dealing in possible clinical trial spaces, I was willing to do whatever the hospital wanted me to do. Even if that meant getting up early and getting a train to London, when all I wanted to do was rest my aching bones. 

The familiarity with returning to St Bart’s was overwhelming. The clinic I was attending started at 9am and my appointment was for midday. On a very practical level, this meant that waiting would be required as the clinic would have had three whole hours to run late prior to my arrival. 

The waiting room in the East Wing had gone unchanged. I don’t know why I was expecting it to have changed. I lie actually, in my absence they had upgraded from lukewarm jugs of water to a standalone water cooler that dispensed more lukewarm water. The room itself, still holds far too much heat and there are still insufficient seats to accommodate the number of people who attend that clinic. People seem to sit wherever they can find a ledge. It looks so untidy, with patients sat incredibly close together on plastic seats, facing various directions whilst other patients sit on the seats fashioned from oversized window ledges that are too deep to be sat on with any type of decorum. Wheelchair uses find space next to the window seats, but there is no designated spaces that would indicate an area where a wheelchair user has stopped on purpose rather than just finding themselves next to a plug in heater in the middle of a corridor. Needless to say, it is an environment that feels cramped and overbearing. My previous visit to Bart’s had been about a year before. Desperately trying not to moan, the oppressive nature of the room, and my imagined but fierce belief that plus ones would never give up seat to a young myeloma sufferer, immediately put me in a bad mood. 

I tried to read, I thought perhaps reading would make the wait seem more bearable. Not that I knew what I was waiting for. Reading proved to be impossible because that room carries sound that I could not escape from. Any conversation that did not originate from my lips on that day, was pure and utter, superficial nonsense. My attempts to read just encouraged me to look at the other patients and declare them evil for interrupting my novel. Housemate dropped by briefly during this time to deliver a much needed packet of Refreshers. They helped. But we were still waiting. 

Maybe I was being too dramatic in wondering why we had been summoned there. Logically, I knew I was there to discuss the trial and hopefully get on to said trial. I know what my problem was, I didn’t want to get in to see the Medically Trained Person only to be told that it was all a gigantic mistake, that I wasn’t on the trial and that I must have misunderstood something four days previously. This trial literally is my chance to prolong my life. I did not want to hear about any mistakes. . 

Irrational concerns about my hopes being dashed after nearly five years of having myeloma, are not so irrational. 

I was eventually called through at 1.25. It was time. Time for what though? We did not have a clue. 


Like I said, we did not know what to expect. Was I going to have to pass a number of tests? Was there a written word exam nobody told me about? Would the Medically Trained Person not put me on his trail if I started to have a hot flush and as a result of hot flush leave a damp mark on his chair? I just did not know. I was not privy to any of the discussions that led me to Bart’s. 

So, up the river without a paddle, I walked through the double doors, followed by another set of double doors until I reached a single door and knocked. The Medically Trained Professional opened that door and  in we went. 

Inside his office, ready to greet us was a Medically Trained Person I know well. He, my doctor throughout my last transplant, was smilin, actually smiling at me which made a refreshing change from the previous week’s tears. I am a simple woman and I appreciated the familiarity. I’m surprised he did not automatically call me ‘Em’, which had had started to do when I was last under his care. 

I would categorise what followed as informal. We did not have an in depth chat about the clinical trial (Daratumumab). I was told that there was around a 30% chance of it working. I reasoned that that 30% was better than trying nothing at all. The word ‘antibody’ was mentioned a few times but not enough that I actually understood why. Then, probably within five minutes of us entering, the Medically Trained Person signed a white piece of paper and said that was his consent for the trial. 

Could it be that without any blood tests, biopsies or an explanation, I was on the trial? Apparently so. Even now, I loathe to jinx it.

And with that, I think I expressed enormous gratitude, and then we were ushered out of the office with a few sheets of stapled white A4 paper containing a very important signature, and that was it. Well, it wasn’t quite it, we still had to go and see the trial nurse, but that was it for our time with the doctor. Clutching the consent form  and looking at my mother in disbelief, we made our way up to the seventh floor of the main building, otherwise known as the cancer centre. 

St Bart’s cancer centre, despite the view was just as foul as I remember. We did not get past the waiting area on our visit but that area was filthy. There was rubbish everywhere and unhappy people sitting amongst yet more plastic chairs waiting to be called through. I do not know if I imagined it, but I am sure there was actual rubbish littering the waiting area and mug rings decorating the tables. I did not imagine that the adjoining toilet I used, was soiled with stains all over the floor and toilet seat. How does this happen by 2pm in the afternoon? I know that people are sick, but really? What does it say when patients don’t respect their treatment area enough to keep it clean? I’m not going to answer that because I am very thankful to be transferring to Bart’s and I think it is a wonderful Hospital. 

This s a blog about how much I love St Bartholomew’s Hospital and not one where I highlight all of it’s faults. I really do love St Bart’s and I am pleased about being transferred there. Honest. Honestly. 

Amongst the debris, Mamma Jones and I read through the literature I had been given and then I signed my life away, consenting to everything they asked me to consent to. A skim read would be the correct description of what I did. I was beginning to get tired. Since I was diagnosed with Myeloma, I have consented to many things and I can confirm that there was nothing exceptional about this form. Let’s hope the subject matter proves to be exceptional, but the form itself? A form is a form is a form. 

After a few minutes, we met the Clinical Trial Nurse. Not that I am picky in anyway nor does she have massive metaphorical shoes to fill when it comes to making me feel comfortable with my care, but I approved. We discussed the practicalities of the trial and I handed over the stapled bits of A4. 

I was then weighed (dropping a full half kilogram from my morning’ weigh in), measured and my blood was taken. And that was it. I was sent home. Practicalities, like the start date of the trial were to be decided once my dates for radiotherapy had been confirmed.

Was that it? Was that all that was needed to get me onto a trial that has a 30% chance of prolonging my life? I do not not know what I expected. I did not even get the chance to express my gratitude to such an extent that it made everybody feel uncomfortable. I didn’t learn about the ins and outs of the trial. I just stipulated that I did not want a semi-permanent line and said I still wanted to be able to go on holiday. 

It’s now over a week since that appointment and I still do not want to do anything endanger my place on the trial. As the rest of our correspondence has been done over the phone or by email, I am afraid that they are going to discover something catastrophic. It doesn’t even need to be catastrophic, it could be something perfectly innocent that could effect my place on the trial. This week I almost took some extra steroids, and even those could have impacted on the trial. 

It cannot be taken away.

On the subject of steroids, no tale of our day in London would be fully complete if I did not tell you what happened after we left the hospital. By 3.45pm, I was absolutely ravenous. By that point I had been on a high dose of steroids for four days, we had missed lunch and I really was ravenous. Well, I was tired first, hungry second but I knew that if we fed the hunger, Mamma Jones would be accompanied by a much nicer me on our journey home. 

We went to a restaurant and I am most thankful that the restaurant was quiet, for I sat down and ate a starter of calamari followed by half a chicken and chips. Once I was finished with my chicken, I finished my mother’s. Mamma Jones’s chicken was not included in my half chicken tally. I couldn’t stop. The least said about this meal the better, but in short, I could not stop eating. Afterwards, we travelled to Kings Cross station where I indulged in yet another banana milkshake. Then, and there was a then, when we eventually arrived home at approximately 8.30pm, I had a bowl of porridge with Jersey milk. Steroids

Steroids are responsible for a lot.

Straight after I ate my bowl of porridge I fell asleep and I stayed in bed for the next 36 hours. Our 10 hours in London, wiped me out. I know that it is understandable, but I was still surprised the following day to find myself incapable of getting out of bed. The exertion was worth it. Meeting with the staff at Bart’s and albeit briefly discussing the next steps made me feel like things were moving quickly and they were moving in the right direction. I know that the odds of this working are extremely low, but I feel positive about it. Well, I feel ready for my treatment to start and I am not going into it thinking it’s going to fail…So, yes, that’s something. 

I cannot quite believe that I am on the trial. I do not know how these things work, but I know that in terms of criteria and timings, I am lucky. I know that Myeloma patients don’t get ‘lucky’, I’m fortuitous. 

I know (because people have told me, not. because I have done any of my own research) that it is incredibly difficult to get on any dartumumab trial in the UK and it is for this reason that I will not let myself fully believe that I am on the trial. I might have signed the papers. I might have  completed the pre tests (I haven’t actually completed the pre tests, I still need to do a 24 hour urine sample). I might have been told that I am on the trial. I just cannot, until I watch a very slow infusion enter my body this Wednesday believe that I am really on the trial. At that point, I might doing a celebratory fist clench and feeling a tiny bit lucky. 

EJB x

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

It’s Only Da ‘Roids

steroidnoun BIOCHEMISTRY 

Any large class of organic compounds with a characteristic molecular structure containing four rings of carbon atoms (three six-membered and one five). They include many hormones, alkaloids and vitamins.

Say what?

The above, I imagine after choosing a life of easy culture and civil service instead of biochemistry, is a fairly crude definition of a steroid. I do not know the molecular compounds of steroids. Why would I? Nor do I know the specifics of the steroid I have come to loathe called Dexamethasone. All I know is that above description of a steroid fails, quite dramatically to encompass the sheer power of a drug I have been taking for nearly five years and for that whole period of time has be routinely kicking me in the guts. My quick Google search makes it sound so innocent. I know some steroids are innocent, but ever since I watched an episode of California Dreamin’ where Tiffany became addicted to steroids to enhance her volleyball performance, I have known there are something to be wary of. And wart I have been. 

Of Dexamethasone, the Internet describes it as a medicine this time and as ‘a synthetic drug of corticosteroids type, used especially as an anti-inflammatory agent’. I’m not going to begin to understand what that means, all I would say, is that for the moral of our current story, remember it’s use as an ‘anti-inflammatory agent’. 

Whilst we are on the subject of uses, I do not know, as this blog should clearly indicate, why I take this drug so routinely. I think I understand why I am talking it now, but why Dexamethasone supports pretty much all the myeloma treatment I have ever been on, well, that reason is anybody’s time to research. In light of my ignorance, I thought the least I could do was to investigate the list of known side effects, for it is those where I feel I know the drug as well as I need to. 

According to Wikipedia the side effects of taking this dreamboat can include acne, insnomnia, vertigo, increased appetite, weight gain, impaired skin healing, depression, euphoria, hypertension, increased risk of infection, raised intraocular pressure, vomiting, dsyspepsia, confusion, amnesia, irritability, nausea, malaise, headaches and cataract. These are the common side effects.  If you are bored, research further but I think I have copied enough to get my point across. They do a lot and they are unpleasant. 

Steroids are hard on the body. They have always been hard on my body. In fact, such has been my response to steroids that for the last two treatments I have had, I have been allowed to take a lower than the recommended dose so that I could have something that resembles a normal human’s week at the end of it. I would rather take any other of my routine medications, even the one that gave me nightmares. 

Wikipedia’s list failed to list my biggest problem with the stuff and that’s the fatigue. The inevitable crash after the fall. And it was inevitable. I used to prefer taking my month’s steroids over four back to back days as opposed to weekly, just so I did not have to deal with them as much. I didn’t always succeed, but that was my goal. Get them out of the way as soon as humanly possible, whilst still adhering to the will of the Medically Trained People.

Why on earth are you telling us all of this, Emma? 

Patience. Something I lack in abundance, but bear with me. There is relevant, I assure you. 

Scooped up all the shock that happened 10 days ago now, I was prescribed what is medically known as a ‘pulse of steroids’; with the particular steroid being, yes you guessed it, Dexamethasone. At the time, I thought I had been on a similar pulse of steroids before,  but I soon discovered that the only thing I had to compare this pulse to from previous treatments was like walking up Parliament Hill and comparing it to Mount Snowdon.

The course started with taking 20 tablets (40mgs of Dex) for four days, reducing to 10 tablets (20mgs of Dex) on days 5 and 6. By Day 7 and 8 I was down to just five tablets ( 10mgs Dex) and for the final two days, I was prescribed a piddly two tablets per day. Just in case you were wondering, this was to be taken on top of my usual-keep-things-at-bay and not-so-usual-pile-of-pain-medication. So, I have been taking a lot of medication. The prescription for the first four days was for more steroids than I had taken in the last four complete monthly cycles of treatment. It was a LOT of steroids.

When I first heard of this mammoth dose, I thought that it was the sour cherry on top of a pretty ropey, dry cake. It didn’t take long, even in the mental state I was in that day, to be apprehensive about this course of treatment. Eyes were rolled.

How big is the inevitable crash going to be? When am I going to crash? How am I going to go to the toilet over the next week? Am I even going to be able to go to the toilet? What’s my mouth going to taste like? Will I be able to drink water? 

Sometimes, I should spend less time worry about the answers to unknown questions and just let Myeloma take me for a ride. I mean, that sounds all very nice and tranquil and a creator of less worry knots. To be clear however, I would never complain about worry knots. If worry knots exist and you were to mention your own worry knots to me, especially after 10 days on steroids, there might be problems. Or at least some solitarily mocking.

I am digressing. I am constantly digressing and that’s because I am here to tell you what it actually feels like to take 238mg of Dexamethasone.  It makes your brain feel like fuzz. My mental recall, unless it is about episodes of the West Wing, is… well… what was I saying? At this rate, I am going to wish I had different friends. They are too learned for me right now.

Digressing again… I was right to be apprehensive about it. Prior to starting, I had already discovered that the Dex offered some pain relief in the 24 hours after taking it, but this was the only benefit I saw and I did not know for certain that it was the Dex that had made it easier to get around on that particular day. My immediate thought was that I was not going to be able to move for at least 10 days. At a push, I thought I would get through the first few days and then I would be a bedbound mess for weeks after, unable to get out of bed for a drink. Thankfully, so far at least, that has not happened.

Instead, the steroids ploughed me into a period of emotional instability supported by mass uncontrollable, US reality TV level of food cravings. It’s probably best to break it down. Wikipedia needs to update it’s ‘common side effects’ information because nowhere on that list did I see fatigue, constipation, tin mouth, facial hair growing  at the speed of light and tears, lots and lots of tears.

My first few days can be easily categorised as ‘the crying days’. Without the Dex, I dare say that I had some very valid excuses to cry, but on the Dex it was uncontrollable. My usual stoicism forbids this sort of behaviour and I have managed to install a usual system where my crying is done in the privacy of my fortnightly counsellor’s sessions or alone at the darkness of night.

I returned to the safety of Mamma Jones’s nest after the latest of my Bad News Day, and it was there, where I am surround by my immediate family, where I found a lot of things to get emotional about. I could feel that a full outburst was never far away and it wasn’t far away. Somedays, I cried just because the pain was overwhelming me. Other days, and these are the ones that surprised me, I cried in gratitude and in sadness and all of it was completely out of my hands. 
Something as simple as Mamma Jones bringing me my dinner. She cooked it, carried it upstairs to my room and served it to me every day. Almost every delivery resulted in tears, whether she saw them or not. The steroids made my insides come out. 

The worst part of my behaviour was around my nieces. Aged 5 and 10 years old, I do not know if they have an idea why they  Auntie Emma constantly breaking into silent tears mid conversation over the course of a weekend. It’s not something I chose to do, it was completely out of my hands and that is a testament to the power of steroids.

For the first few days, as I acclimatised and things sunk in, I just had to look at them and I immediately began to miss them. My brain would fast forward to that point in time where I once again won’t be there and I’d worry they wouldn’t remember me. Thoughts like that could come in an instance. Would I always be their favourite auntie (if I am indeed their favourite auntie) if they cannot remember me at all?  I asked the eldest if she would miss me, I know I shouldn’t have done, but my steroids took away the filter. Her answer was a ‘maybe’. So, bathed in love and not feeling remotely vulnerable, I cried again. The eldest was supposed to spend two days with me in London, and even the guilt at having to let her down had me blubbing. 

At my most confusing, at least what I imagine was the most confusing for them anyway, was a very innocent conversation about breasts or in our case ‘boobies’, that may well be ranked in my non-existent list of worst conversations ever. At the age of 10, my eldest niece is going through the changes girls go through. Her little sister enjoys this and proceeding to tell us that ‘Lara has little boobs, Auntie Emma has BIG boobs and I have no boobies’. That was it. That’s all she said. Even recounting said story makes my ears water. I immediately started to cry, not loadly, it was more of a silent, please do not see this, sort of cry. It was so innocent, but it highlighted how much there is for me to lose and I have absolutely no control over it. I think they rallied together, but I am pretty sure they had a few days of thinking that Auntie Emma was a total wing bat.

I expected the mood altering side of steroids to manifest itself into rage. Sorry, I meant RAGE! It did not. Even when two women complained bitchily to me that I had put my luggage in the wrong place on a train carriage resulting in them dismantling my disabled friendly bag set up lovingly done by Big Sister, so they did not need to lift up their own suitcases,  even then, the rage was nowhere to be seen. Instead, I apologised, returned to me seat and cried. I should have told them why I couldn’t move my luggage, or why they had just seen my sister escort me onto the train, or why one of the bags was full of prescription medication and another contained two empty specimen bottles awaiting 24hrs worth of my urine, or why I was free to travel in the middle of a week day. I should have done all or any of these things, but I didn’t. The steroids just made me cry and I am wholeheartedly ashamed of myself. 

Maybe that will come, but if it is anywhere near as strong as the tears, stay away from me. Actually, don’t stay away from me, the steroids make me paranoid and I do not want to feel like that either. Anyway, I cannot do up my bra at the moment, so I doubt I’ll be getting into any physical fights any time some.

I suppose the tears the could be neatly boxed under Wikipedia’s ‘depression’ section. I do not think I have been able to portray the weight of the feelings I felt. Just do me a favour and trust me when I say it was ‘bad’. Thankfully, as my dose has lowered, there have been less tears. I have been feeling far more aligned with my usual self and that involves burying my true feelings until I am alone or with my counselling. A healthy approach if ever there was one. 

All other side effects, possibly with the acceception constantly thinking I have glandular fever and excess facial hair, are concentrated around bodily holes. That is how powerful steroids are. 

If there is one thing that a pulse of steroids did to me that I was expecting, was to increase my appetite. A bodily hole. I dare not total up how much I have eaten in the last ten days nor how many calories have been consumed on pretty much zero physical activity. It’s a lot. Like, a bloody lot.  As I soon discovered, the Dex did not have me searching for all foods, just the bad ones. I know asparagus is good for you and I like asparagus, but a tin of mushy peas made a far better plate fellow with a pie.  Like I really had to explain that? 

Dexamethasone when taken in isolation and mixed with my body loves nothing more than carbohydrates. If said carbohydrates happen to be served fried, with butter or with a sprinkling of cheese,served with a massive piece of chicken, comes in a packet disguised as a crisp,  or as a cake then that was Nirvana. Fulfilling each craving felt medicinal.

Thinking about food beats thinking about death, but I have never known my desire to eat to be so all consuming. I’ll be honest, and this does make me weak, no ifs or buts, I gave in to every single craving. I’m sure a nutritionist might have a view on this, or just an opinionated person who eats a lot of greens, but I do not want to hear it. I know that it was bad having a bowl of frozen mash potato as a snack one hour before dinner, but I needed the instance gratification despite the fact I had only just finished half a tub of hummus and had porridge for breakfast. The four slices of Soreen that followed that dinner were also completely necessary and, unavoidable. It was treatment.

I know that I have had steroid cravings before, but this last week has been a whole new realm. I arranged a supermarket delivery on Saturday and on top of including foods that would keep me semi-independent, I ordered Skips, Wootsits, Squares (salt and vinegar), toffee popcorn, mini popodoms, boxes of cereal and a packet of bagels.
 The shame!

On Friday, I sent my friend on a quest to my favourite bakery in London to buy slices of my two favourite cakes in our fair land. It was all to satisfy a craving that started 24 hours before. On Thursday, I found myself on Tottenham Court Road with 90 minutes to kill between appointments. In theory, the cakes could have been mine then, but in practice, they could not be. Do you know why? Because I could not walk the 0.8 miles round trip to get them. I had to settle for a Krispy Kreme instead and I do not really like a Krispy Kreme. Oh, just to maintain some level of continuity with this blog, do you know what happened when I realised I was unable of walking to Konditor and Cook for my slices of Lemon Chiffon cake and a Curly Whirly? I cried.

As with anything that goes in, it must come out. Wikipedia definitely neglected to tell us about this. The only thing I will say on this matter, is sodium docusate. Sodium docusate and lots of it. My long experience in large doses of steroids does not support any argument towards diarrhoea. Steroids mixed with the pain medication I am on, causes the opposite issue. I prepared for this eventuality and so far, so every four days. Yesterday, my experience can only be classed as sublime.

Being on so many steroids also had me searching my brain for the techniques of years gone by. Again, this relates to holes. Linseed is a lifesaver, just don’t accidentally let a puppy eat it. 

Finally, no story of mountains of steroids would be complete if I did not mention the effect it has on my mouth. I used to call it Tin Mouth. I still call it Tin Mouth. I think I have listed enough life altering side effects already, but do not underestimate the impact of having everything in your mouth, including your salvia tastes like mental. Thank goodness nobody but my dentist gets near my mouth. Every flavour is distorted. No amount of ice lollies will get rid of it. My tastebuds are tainted. The weather this weekend was lovely, but I could not quench my thirst with an ice cold glass of water because such a thing would taste of week old unbrushed teeth mixed with pond. Thankfully, though probably not for my kidneys, steroids make me less thirsty than usual, but unfortunately one still needs fluids to function. People like me need fluids to take their 20-40 pills per day. The trusty brew is strictly off the menu. The only thing that tastes remotely like something I would want in my mouth is lemon squash. That was another thing I had to think about and prepare for. Squash had to be purchased.

πŸ‘…πŸ½πŸ˜­πŸ‘…πŸ½πŸ˜­πŸ‘…πŸ½πŸ˜­

I think you get it now. A course of steroids is no walk in the park. I mean, I cannot walk around a park at the moment, but it’s hard. The Dex, even though it is there to help, above all the other medications I take it seems, mostly to hinder. Nothing seems safe from it.  I would even go as far as saying I hate them.  I hate that I have to make sure I take it by 11am, even if I am too tired to make sure my stomach is full, so I can get a good night’s sleep. I hate that even though I have taken it early everyday, there have still been nights where the power of the Dex have overpowered the strength of my sedatives.

Most of all, I hate the unknown. I finish said course of steroids today and I have no idea if I am about to have one of those, all too familiar steroid crashes.  I have been preparing myself for this for 10 days, and it looks like it may not come.  Do I let my guard down?  It’s not worth the punt.

I will never live a life completely free of steroids. I may get to be free of them for the next week, but they’ll be back. They’ll always come back.  Dexamethosone goes with Myeloma like salt in porridge. They should always be served together. It’s an acquired taste. 

In conclusion, despite everything I have written, I am a liar. Despite previously willing this pulse to end as quickly as possible and for the steroids to depart my body,  I do not want to stop taking them in the short term. In fact, first thing this morning I called the  Medically Trained People ready to beg  them to allow me to  take more.  

I do not want to prolong the mouth, waist and emotional altering torment just to give me something to talk about. I just want my pain to improve. And at the beginning of last week, for 12 hour periods at a time, my pain improved. The Dex really did act as an ‘anti-inflammatory agent’. Last week, when I was taking 20 or 40mg a day of steroids, I may have been eating non-stop and crying at the sight of the dog, but I could walk normally. I did not walk like Quasimodo. The ‘pulse’ of steroids, designed to control my pain, actually did control my pain. I’ve weighed it up in my head. I will get more from the steroids right now, crash or no crash, than I would by not taking them. The radiotherapy is going to work, it’s just not going to work right away and I need some independence. I need to be able to clean the mushy peas I dropped on the kitchen floor on Saturday.

I never thought I would say it, but I don’t think I can do it without them. 

EJBx

P.S. I cannot think of steroids without thinking of the sign my friend made for me all the way back in 2012, that states ‘It’ Only Da ‘Roids’. She’s literate by the way, I think the use of ‘da’ was designed to make me smile.  It’s a thought I hold close. Through tears, shout, late night shopping and whatever else it throws at me; steroids are not my controller. 

Myeloma is.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Thumbs Down πŸ‘ŽΒ 

WARNING!

The following blog does not contain any references to feelings or death (bar a brief discussion about my hatred of something). Therefore, to break out of my current cycle, this blog is not depressing. My usual content will resume at some point, so in the meantime, sit back and enjoy reading something mundane. 

πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸΌπŸ‘πŸ½πŸ‘πŸΎπŸ‘πŸΏ

After living with Myeloma for 1589 days, I thought I had experienced every possible side effect, bowel issue, general irritant and injury possible that relates to this wretched disease. Yesterday, I discovered that I was wrong. Things can still happen as a direct result of having Myeloma that I can not foresee. Yesterday, my unforeseen injury was paper cuts. Those small things. That’s right, for nearly 48 hours, in spite of my current inability to walk up or down any stairs without clutching on to both banisters and leaving the sound of what some would consider to be very odd sex noises in the air, whenever and wherever I do something remotely ‘strenuous’; I have been moaning about paper cuts. * For the past 48 hours, all of the above pales in insignificance to the paper cuts, the bleeding paper cuts I received all in the name of Myeloma.


πŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ»πŸ‘ŽπŸΌπŸ‘ŽπŸ½πŸ‘ŽπŸΎπŸ‘ŽπŸΏ

How could this possibly happen I hear you cry? How could I, Emma Jane Bones make such a Living-with-Cancer -rookie-error, that resulted in the breakage of two thumb nails and cuts to the skin between the nail and thumb, on both thumbs at the same time? 

The answer lies with tablets. Lots and lots of tablets, technique and a dash of poor post application of gel polish nail care.

πŸ‘ŽπŸ‘ŽπŸ»πŸ‘ŽπŸΌπŸ‘ŽπŸ½πŸ‘ŽπŸΎπŸ‘ŽπŸΏ

I dread to think how many tablets I have taken over the 1589 days, I wouldn’t even know how to calculate it. As a rule of thumb, I work on a fortnightly basis instead because sorting my medication is the most depressing thing I have to do on the regular. I do not want to be reminded of my shackles on any basis, but having to do it twice a month beats having that feeling it evokes four times a month. On a far more practical level, sorting my drugs in bulk creates space. Yesterday was Drug Delivery Day, so I was in desperate need to make the packaging of two bags full of drugs, disappear. I live in a room in a two bedroom flat in London;  the space is too limited to include cancer medication and the unnecessary packaging that comes with it. I ” have two dossette boxes, should I live the dream and get four?

I currently take at least 33 pills a day. My weekly pill total has 245 pills destined for my gullet, which takes into account the extras medication requires for Mondays. That’s 492 pills per fortnight; that is 492 individual pills removed from a box and then pushed out of its packaging into the relevant divided section in my waiting dosette boxes. 492. 492 times I pushed one of my thumbs against the slab a pill willing it to come out of it’s packaging before the top of my thumb hit the empty casing of the plastic. I probably failed 491 times. With each push, I  added further injury to my already injured thumbnails. I should have known better. 

Yesterday, I also receieved over 300 of my prescribed laxatives spread across at least six different boxes. It’s been a while since I mentioned it, but know that this is medication js still extremely cruicial to my wellbeing. Being the Myeloma Pro I once was, I decided to decant these into an old empty, correctly labelled,  medicine jar I had kept for such an occasion. That’s one of my Top Myeloma Tips by the way (in modern times, it could also be referred to as a ‘hack’ but I am not modern nor am I a Buzzfeed article). Who needs boxes when you can have a clean and empty medicine bottle with a safety cap? As usual, I’m digressing, back to the story at hand; it simply meant there was approximately 300 pills on top of the 492 pills to be popped.

It becomes grey. At some point during my  hour of drug dispensing, I broke both my thumb nails. As my legendary stoicism lives on, I  too, soldiered on in spite of the pain. I kept going, despite my thumbs turning more red with every push. I endured. I thought it couldn’t break me. Then I saw the blood to accompany the stinging feeling that had been going on for a good thirty minutes and I saw my surrender. I turned to Housemate and asked him to sort out the remaining laxatives.

Quick sidebar, can you see why I hate the job in question? Obviously you can. I have developed a coping mechanism to get through it all. There is only one pleasant thing about filling my boxes and believe it or not, it’s the colour combinations of my medication.  Stick with me. At nighttime, I take a blue pill, one bright orange , two pale yellows, two bright yellow, two grey, one pale orange and several white pills of varying shape or size. Once safely tucked into their relevant sections, I look at them through cross eyes. It’s hashtag satisfying. 

EJB x
* This really just means any movement greater than holding my mobile phone with rested elbows and tap, tap, tapping away. Anything else, results in a noise and a grimace.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Pleasure

I have been pondering in recent months the following question, it’s a question that goes round and around my head until I am down the well worn A road wondering about the point of my existence. It is a question that comes without innuendo despite the way I have decided to word it. It’s a question where to answer in the negative terrifies me.  The question, my friends is ‘can I experience pleasure, anymore?’

I suppose I could have substituted the word ‘happiness’ for ‘pleasure’, but I feel happiness is something that can be temporarily achieved in a 22 minutes episode of Modern Family. Pleasure, to me anyway, is something else. It’s prolonged and it involves satisfaction. Something meaningful that isn’t transmitted through my television. 

It has been a long dark autumn where I have felt that all pleasure and all opportunity to feel pleasure; that the function for which has been removed from my brain. I don’t laugh anymore. Long gone are the days when the innuendo sort of pleasure was met; melphalan and menopause put paid to that years ago. I’m not worried about that. To the all encompassing sort of pleasure of which I yearn, I don’t know what it should feel like anymore. How much did I really laugh before?

There are many days when I find myself waking up, knowing that the day ahead is going to be much the same as my previous day, and as with the day before, I will spend it going through the motions. Not emotions you understand, just motions. 

I don’t have a job, I get tired washing myself, there is not a higher purpose to my life most days then just taking my drugs, patting the dog and making sure I am out of the bed before Housemate gets home. I don’t have the functionality to do anything else.

I suppose, I do the absolute minimum to survive, especially on the days of steroid crashing and Ixazomib spewing. I wake, I sit, I eat and all to the soundtrack of my television. 75 percent of the time, I could not tell you what I have watched from one day to the next. I probably could not tell you everything I have watched today. 

On the days I can move further afield, I do the things I used to do that entertained me. Except now, they have to be done within a very tight social security allowance budget,  pass the necessary  considerations (constraints) like walking distance, seating and distance from home, before I can even leave the house. Evidentially, there are a lot of things I would wish to do that I cannot. Despite these obstacles, I do, somehow, manage to pass the time.  The most common feeling I get on return from any of these jaunts is, exhaustion. 

πŸ’ŠπŸ’ŠπŸ’Š

Is it the Larozapam my brain asks? Is this indifference I have allowed to develop towards my life due to the multi-use drug I take to prevent nausea but others take for sedation and anti anxiety?  Or, is it one of the other 12 different medications that I swallow on a daily basis that has stopped me being able to feel? Have they brought this shield down that I cannot penetrate, and the weight of which leaves me all so very fatigued? Internal feeling of apathy, anyone? 

Of course, there is another theory. This one might be my favourite. I wonder if I no longer feel pleasure because I do not want to feel pain. Have I, since my relapse put myself in to an ultimate self preservation mode? Should I patent it? If I cannot laugh and feel happy, then surely that’s a decent payoff to not feel constantly scared and alone? For four years with My Myeloma, I was waiting for something positive to happen, it didn’t.  The sad truth is, I am now waiting for the ultimate bad thing to happen and I am praying that that does not come too soon.

Bar one week in October, I have not had a midweek outside of my bed  since I started my current drug regime five cycles ago. It’s an enslaught. Any strength I build up in the days pre drug crash, is depleted on the first day post my Dexamethasone and Ixazomib dose. Then with each day that passes, my reserves run lower and lower. Concurrently, for every time a loved one forgets that I cannot do anything on a Tuesday or Wednesday (and possibly Thursday) and then they invite me to do something on a Tuesday or a Wednesday, I go into the red due to my frustration, anger and plain old green jealousy. My life is lousy enough without having to repeat it five times a week.

In my last blog, I spoke about death. Not because I want to die, but because I fear that is what is left for me now. I hope it is not imminent, but all that depends on a variety of factors I have no control over.  It’s not the place or time to discuss these things in this blog, but I saw a figure a few weeks ago. A potential timeframe, and I really don’t have the capacity to think about what that means for me or for those in my Support Network, and if it is possible to balance that with the quality of life I have now. There are days when I would feel better off. 

It’s becoming incredibly hard for me to consider myself as anything other than an expensive perishable with a limited shelf life. Sure, I am Emma, I am EJ, I am me; but what does that mean now when so much of my identity has been erased? Most the time, I feel like a stranger to myself. 

Am I lacking pleasure because I am still the pre Myeloma version of me, just significantly shorter with less limbs, whilst everybody around me has managed to grow, some have even gone as far as to grow whole new humans in the four years that I have had this wretched disease?  

I was once told that my situation was too depressioning to be around frequently, so the easiest thing for somebody to do was to cease all communication and live their lives independently of mine. Understandably, I  worry about this becoming my legacy because I will not mprove now. Everybody wants to be around you in the first year of Myeloma; the numbers dwindle somewhat thereafter. 

The insecurities this has left me with are profound. I  try to avoid talking about myself (she says in a rather lengthy blog about herself and rolls her eyes) as much as possible. But then, what else do I have to talk about? I’ve already said I don’t have a job and I don’t remember what I did yesterday. Has my monotony made your pleasure disappear? Have I made you runaway yet? 

πŸƒπŸ»β€β™€οΈπŸƒπŸ»πŸƒπŸΌβ€β™€οΈπŸƒπŸΌπŸƒπŸ½β€β™€οΈπŸƒπŸ½πŸƒπŸΎβ€β™€οΈπŸƒπŸΎπŸƒπŸΏβ€β™€οΈπŸƒπŸΏ

There you are! 

Did you know I had a point at the start of this blog? It wasn’t that I am a bad editor,  because I think I have proven that point with what I have written above. No, my point was that my pleasure has not been lost in self pity. I have recently returned from a much needed two week break away from my medication. I currently have no idea what that two weeks away from medication has done to my body, but I know what it has done to my mind. It’s called perspective my friends and a dark cloud has been lifted. Not eradicated mind, lifted. 

It’s harder to see and it’s harder to earn, but believe it or not, I do still experience pleasure. Not the innuendo kind unfortunately, which makes my four weekly pregnancy tests quite the waste in resource. 

πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸΌπŸ‘πŸ½πŸ‘πŸΎπŸ‘πŸΏ

I lost sight of my pleasure for a little bit; for five months in fact. I lost it all to fatigue. Fatigue has literally been ruling my life and I cannot emphasise this enough that fatigue is not just restricted to feeling sleeping. For me, everything slows down, everything becomes harder and everything whether it is an email or an existential crisis, seems a  much larger issue than it actually is.

Looking back, there were hidden and frequent pockets of pleasure throughout the last five months. The windows to enjoy myself are smaller and further apart but pleasure can be found and it has been experienced. By me. 

To emphasise my point, here are a few examples: any conversations with my nieces, being a party to Treat Yourself Sunday, talking Christmas wrapping with Big Sister, watching a movie at a friend’s house or maybe, just maybe bending the rules a little bit and staying out past midnight once in a blue moon. Or, it could be something as simple as saying goodbye to somebody and walking away with a smile on my face and a spring in my step. It’s in knowing that a friend cares enough about me to swim a mile a day for 26 consecutive days to raise money for Myeloma UK (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Emma-Boucher-Matthews). It’s going to the cinema whenever my body allows it, not falling asleep and writing about it in my little black book. 

In October, my some miracle and a little bit of understanding from the Medically Trained People, I was able to once again attend the London Film Festival 15 times in spite of my treatment. I got dressed and put makeup on everyday. I felt learned and alive until I got tired and had to spend a week in bed once it was over. I did not end up celebrating the 10 days I spent enjoying the festival, I wallowed at how quickly my body went downhill.

Most recently, I went on a holiday. An actual holiday. With a lot of help from Mamma Jones, I used my passport and I opened my eyes. From the minute we left these fair shores I experienced pure pleasure.  The holiday gave me a swift kick up my derriΓ¨re, and reminded me there is pleasure to be found everywhere. Even when the prognosis might not be what I want it to be. I need to find a way to remember this the next time the tough gets going.

Above everything else, I need to remember that my life is not a foregone conclusion yet, and I should not be treating as if it is. And,  in the words of Uncle Albert I also need to remember that  ‘I love to laugh. Loud and long and clear’. I really do want to be a merrier me.

EJB x 
P.S. There is still time to sponsor my friend’s marathon swim, which she completed yesterday. Just use the link above. 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Thrushed Out

It breakfast time. A Sunday morning breakfast time no less. I knew this long before somebody physically walked in to my room to to let me know it is breakfast time at all, because of the din they make outside whilst dishing up and not because I have the body clock of somebody permanently located in Beirut and found myself naturally hungry.

Anticipating many people getting round to seeing this later in the day, maybe after they have enjoyed their own Sunday brunches (in my head midday is a far more acceptable time for the first meal on a Sunday than 08:15hrs), can I recommend that you do not view it with or just before food? Consider this a health warning. I do not have the money to be sued. For, on this Sunday morning, I am writing to you about thrush. My very own oral thrush to be precise.

The possibility of something going wrong with one’s gob post chemotherapy is pretty high. So high in fact, there is a reference to it in an episode of Sex and the City and we all know how revered that show once was and therefore it is a fact most accurate, no? None of my three chemotherapies for Transplant Number 2 required ice lollies, but as with all other post IV chemotherapy I have had, as a precaution, I was given mouthwash to use. Crucially and this was my downfall, bar the the First Transplant the Actual First, when I did get some dryness and soreness, giving me the slimiest voice for the radio; I have never experienced the mouth ulcers I understand one can get from their chemotherapy. These mouth ulcers, I understand, are not the cancer equivalent of an unwanted spot by the why, in some cases they can compare with hair loss and are often treated by the morphine. I still find this difficult to be true but it is.

And still, despite knowing what could happen, I became complacent. When I was given the first mouth wash on Day -6, which required mixing two separate salty ointments in a glass,  swooshing the combined fluid around my mouth for 60 seconds and then discard. For four times a day.  I do not know if I suffered some sort of trauma during my childhood, but there is no way I can gurgle anything for more than half a minute in my mouth. When I attempt to do so, my  cheeks feel like they are going to explode and I almost always become so close to gagging that gagging is the reason for me spitting. 

My name is Emma Jane Jones and I am bad at mouthwash. 

Despite my complacency, I thought to myself, make a compromise, do two swooshes a day instead of four. I had enough on my plate. And when I was sick, would that mean I would have to endure it again? I am not sure how many I actually did take but I know there are currently a few boxes of the stuff on my windowsill at home and I have been  showing what as a child I called a ‘Geographical Tongue’ since last Tuesday. Geographical because the fungus grows like a map. God, I used to love showing it off. 

On my transfer from the day ward on Wednesday, it took well over 24 hours to get hold of a mouth wash again, but this time,  I was no longer on salt water. I was on Diffram. Nothing tastes worst than Diffram. Diffram ruins whatever you eat for the rest of your life. I tried to get then to take it back, to revert to the salt water, but I was told it was too late. My mouth had gone too far. Not only am I on the luminous green Diffram four times a day, but I also gave to take four doses of a mouth drop that taste like something you would likely find at the bottom of a certain sort of elderly lady’s handbag. 

It’s all my own doing, however, I know this and I cannot complain.. At the moment it feels like there is a furry film covering my entire mouth, unless I use the Diffram straight after brushing my teeth in which case, it feels like I have salt and wounds and they are becoming one in my mouth. My mouth is surrounded by some dry flaky skin that used to be my lips.

Like I said, I’m not complaining. I should have used all the mouthwash. If I had used it all and result was  the same, I’d be less angry because at least I would know I had done everything I was supposed to. One cannot rewind the clock and if I could, I definitely would not rewind it for this, so I am letting the eight year old me exhibit for a little bit and ask innocently, would you kiss a mouth like this?  

     

A resounding ‘No’? Okay then.

EJB x

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

The Monologue

“Transplant, transplant, transplant, transplant, transplant , transplant, transplant, transplant, transplant, transplant, transplant.”

Hello there, if you wondered what the above was in reference to, I can confirm that that is my constant internal monologue, and it has been all week. It started on Monday. The countdown to my transplant started when I was given the provisional date, but what I would call the real countdown, full of irrationality, interrupted sleep and attempts to open a Spotify Premium account only really started this week. 

This morning, I woke up ridiculously early after a dream about having to do a last minute piece of work, a piece of work I managed very well FYI, at the place I worked as a bright eyed and eager teenager. The dream  also featured a lot of drinking , which meant I was thirsty, but that has no bearing on this particular tale. Although vivid, it is one of the better dreams I have had this week. The one that kept me awake on Sunday night was my classic anxiety dream. I was at school and I had not studied for my GCSE’s. The difference from the usual set up for this specific dream, was that I had myeloma in it and on top of managing that and my panic at having not studied, my fellow pupils were being inconceivably mean to me. The dream ended and thus my sleep with it, by me entering the Reception crying, telling the Receptionist that I could not go on, and then I turned my head to see Bruce’s bat ears and his walking mate coming to take me home. Monday and Tuesday just featured forgettable, but sleep depriving nightmares. I do recall me falling quite a distance in one of them, I might have been pushed… On Wednesday night I slept, but I wager that was because I had had an 11 hour day.

The point of this blog is not to tell you about my dreams, but it is to tell you that this week, I am feeling what I  imagined I would  feel this week and that is a barrel of various things that all amount to anxious. I am scared, quite scared actually, paranoid, preoccupied, sleep deprived, irrational and emotional. How is that for a toxic mix of feelings? My company is the best.

To be fair to myself, I think outwardly at least, I am managing it all slightly better than my list above implies. Well, as long as nothing else rocks the balance like running out of Bran Flakes. That however, is only because today is Friday and not Tuesday when my internal monologue was at it’s loudest and most booming. Plus, when I feel this way, I am more likely to be quiet around others than sob whilst bashing my fists against the floor.

By Tuesday, after a long weekend, I was convinced, in part due to an unresponded email, that my transplant was going to be postponed. I had convinced myself that the appointment I had the next day was not going to tell me that the tests I had the previous week were fine and I was transplant ready, but something quite the opposite. Something quite bad. My appointment on Wednesday did not tell me that, it told me what my rational side was telling me all along, and it is a truth just as frightening to me as my not so illogical, fictional journies of anxiety. Do not forget, I did have one previous transplant postponed at a time when I believed it to be a dead cert, and that leaves a deep scar that even Bio Oil couldn’t irradiate.

Although I have calmed down somewhat, I am still sleep deprived and faced with the fact that bar me getting a bug of some sort, I will be going in for a transplant in five days. FIVE DAYS! Do you know painful one of those is? I do, at least I think I do, for I do not trust my memory. I have either overestimated or underestimated the various pains I am going to feel, I just do not know which. I could, of course, have remembered it all exactly how it was and it is not a pleasant experience to remember. All I know is that it is coming… Hypothesising about how the SCT is going to go this time, what day I will leave ambulatory care, how long I will be in hospital, just makes my head hurt and my tear ducts open.

“Transplant, transplant, transplant, transplant, transplant , transplant, transplant, transplant, transplant, transplant, transplant.”

It is true that I do know roughly what to expect from the autograft, I do not know what is going to happen with the allograft. Some might, quite reasonably say to me that it is at least three months away and I should not be concerned with it, but this week I am not rational. As the monologue and countdown continues, I know that I have five days and five nights of (reasonable) health left. Thereafter, as long as there are no delays, an event of which I am in constant fear of by the way, my life is going to be all about the transplants indefinitately. Actually, they’ll be all over me and I cannot estimate when the time will come again, when I am going to feel fit enough to venture anywhere alone. I have a countdown to losing my freedom. A Twin yesterday likened it to a prison sentence, one of the indeterminate sort.

Next m Wednesday marks the start of something that is going to be long and arduous, which has an unknown ending. When I see that written down, I can see why this week is proving to be such a hard slog for me. 

Take the emotional tasks aside and I am also a person who has five days left to ensure that she has a fully stocked entertainment unit for the hospital, which includes somehow restoring her accidentally lost iTunes collection. On top of that mammoth task, I have to get photographs printed for the notice board, finish making birthday cards, tidy my room, rewash all my pyjamas, find Doggie, fix and clean EMan, pack, go to the British Museum, have planned fun, clean soft furnishings in the lounge (added to the list yesterday), make sure the delivery yet to arrive due to insufficient postage is in fact the 2metre Apple approved phone charging cable I think I ordered and finally, buy some cheap black pants. You have no idea how huge these tasks seem to me. It’s an epic mountain of completely essential tasks, similar to the one I made before my last transplant about defrosting the freezer and sorting the cupboard of crap, only, way more important and less optional. Let us not forget that these are all things to do on less sleep, with heightened feeling and an air of mania. 

On Wednesday, I was asked quite seriously and enthusiastically if I was looking forward to my transplant. To which I responded “yes and no”. One couldn’t really ask for more than that response to such a huge question right now, but I will try…. A few hours earlier than that silly question fell at my feet, I cried to my counsellor and expressed my fear that all this impending illness could be for nothing. I then, reasoned that if I did not do it, noy go through with it, the failure I fear so greatly, would definitely happen. At the time, I thought my revelation was inspired. Inspired maybe, but I still have an uphill climb followed by another uphill climb and I am sure I’ll lose that path along the way.

Over the long and incredibly short, next five days and I am going to try to hold on to some of the inspiration I found on Wednesday afternoon. It is inevitable however, that I will struggle with it as I have done since I woke up in the early hours of Monday morning.  There is melancholy around every corner. Everything, even Housemate waking me up this morning is a reminder of what I am going to miss.

In conclusion, I am terrified and conflicted about my treatment starting and I wish I did not have to go through it all again, knowing that this time the experience and pain is going to be multiplied by at least 2.5. I know I have no other option. I know it is the best course of action for me, but this week, I feel really sad and angry about that.  I am grieving the things I am going to miss whilst I am doing it. 

Come Wednesday… well, I have to be ready, don’t I?

EJB x

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Frozen Assets

Chemotherapy makes one absented minded. It makes one forgetful. It’s makes my mind a muddle. A big puddle of a muddle in fact.

Never has there been a better example of the giant dirty puddle that is my mind, than my very recent attempt to fill out a blood form for my weekly full blood count. I’m trusted with that sort of power you see, because I am intelligent. I don’t need nurses to use their precocious minutes doing that. Well, today my nurse and I might have been proven wrong on that front. A mere 30 minutes ago, I discovered down in the blood bank that instead of providing my name, hospital number and date of birth, I gave the phlebotomists my name, bank account number and sort code. I repeat, my name, bank account number and sort code.

In my defence, the form filling did come immediately after I been enquiring about a Macmillan Grant. The chat had to cover my dire financial situation, so I did have money, or my lack there of on my mind when I gave a complete stranger my bank account details. So much for security.

It now makes me wonder who else I am giving protected details to without realising. Many a thing does seem to go above my head at the moment. Fortunately for me, I have no funds for any likely thieves to steal. Maybe that is why I have no funds. My main possessions these days currently live in my freezer and that is not a pun. It is food.

EJB x

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Crashed

I may have said in my previous blog that I was going to write two blogs about my brain function, but I have since decided that that would be a disservice. We all need another sorry tale about how hard my life is, before I can show you that I am the bravest person I know, who was born in the 24 May 1984. The logic behind my decision is sound, if I do say so myself. Part I took on one aspect of my fatigue. To truly understand it and for me to document how I am currently spending my days, no story about my life would be fully complete if I did not mention the overriding power of my day-to-day exhaustion.

Exhaustion, which is a daily occurrence. Exhaustion, which is both predictable and unpredictable in how it manages to drag me down to my sofa or my bed. Exhaustion, which on a good day, gives me approximately four hours of energy on a good day. Exhaustion, which if I happen to go over my daily allowance of energy, finds a way to quickly come and bite me on my wobbly bum.

I have said it before, but it is worth reiterating it, fatigue is not the same as requiring sleep. When it comes to this fatigue, I will take exhaustion without sleep, over decreased brain function any day. I’d rather not experience either, but I am trying desperately hard not to feel sorry for myself, and thus acceptance of these facts as I describe them to you, is crucial.

My current treatment consists of Revlimid tablets everyday for three weeks with one week off, accompanied by weekly doses of Dexamethasone and Velcade. To save you reaching for the Google, Dex equals steroids and Velcade equals bleach. It was the reintroduction of Velcade to my body in December, that sent my brain into it’s current downward spiral.

I cannot dress it up and I cannot lie. I am constantly tired. Is this enough clarity for you or do I need to go on for another 11 paragraphs describing what fatigue is like to hammer my point home? I think we know the answer to that one.

I’m really into examples at the moment and last weekend, I can provide you with a rather mundane one. I fell asleep at Mamma Jones’ dining table after I had conducted the most exciting of activities, which included a shower, decanting two tins of baked beans into a saucepan and eating my lunch. I had been out of my bed for a total of three hours. Three whole hours.

Spectators of my life, may believe that giving in to my fatigue on almost a daily basis may exasperate said fatigue. I have heard it many a time. Somebody will kindly advise me to go out, believing that it will make me feel less tired. It is a tactic that I have tried and tested, time and time again, each time willing for a different result. I can conclude, by shouting it from the rooftops, that my fatigue does not work that way. If I am tired, I am tired and nothing is going to change the feeling of complete and utter lethargy.

I am fortunate that there continues to be somebody in my life to tell me that it is okay for me to be tired. I especially need this provision in London. On occasion, he still needs to tell me that I cannot go out when my will is in deep battle over my body. A few weeks ago, I had planned a lovely Saturday of brunch and the cinema followed by an evening out. Having completed the first two activities, totalling five hours of activity, I knew the minute I walked through my front door that I would not be leaving my flat again that day. In fact, I did not leave my flat until two days after that. Missing an opportunity to socialise never gets any easier, let me assure you, and my frustration in the days that followed that Sunday was palpable.

On a much smaller scale, there are moments in my day when I feel so exhausted that picking up a glass of water is a chore. On my bad days, I might not even pick up that glass of water. The are a whole host of other daily activities where my execution of them is hindered by the feeling of nothingness, that I rarely seem to be able to escape from.

I know that this side effect makes me unpredictable and to many people, it makes me unreliable. Most of all, just with my decreasing brain function, it makes me boring. Many a night I wake up worrying that my flakiness, is perceived as just that, cancellation on a whim. Laziness. Selfishness. Indifference.

Haemo Dad was conservatively labelled a ‘fool’ last weekend because he told me that sometimes, I need to be seen to be making an effort with people. He is not the only person to say something like that to me, it is simply the most recent example. It’s a comment that makes me see red, and I’d probably still see red on this subject even if I were not on steroids.

My chemo brain does not stop me from fondly remembering the days when I could have multiple plans. It does not stop me from yearning for the days when I could socialise two days in a row. The thought that people in my Support Network think that they do not see me, or I do not attend events simply because I am not trying hard enough plagues me. Hence my red rage at the weekend. I think, and I know I am somewhat biased in my opinion, that I do try incredibly hard.

Given my current treatment schedule, I have not had That Friday Feeling for a long time. Thursdays through to Sundays tend to be my worst days, and they tend to roll into one big lump of time rather than four distinguishable days and nights. On the occasions when I make weekend plans, because, you know, I am 30 years old and need to live, it’s a military operation. I am going away this weekend, hopefully to enjoy myself and in order to facilitate this, I have ensured that I have no plans on Monday and Tuesday. I also forced myself to sleep for 24 hours since Wednesday morning. I have no idea if my planning will actually be of any benefit. Worrying about it, is also tiring. Can you see a theme here?

A friend of mine said to me that I always seemed to be busy and this makes it very difficult to plan anything with me. It was a conversation that made me cry like a baby when I was alone and had the time to think about it…. I suppose, to some extent, I am busy. My fatigue makes it very difficult for me to be flexible. In order to go out a few days a week, and by out I mean a meal, a trip to the cinema or my hospital treatment, I am forced to rest on all the other days of the week. Few will see and understand how difficult this can be.

It’s difficult on so many counts. It is difficult for me to go out and it is difficult for me to stay in. I strongly suspect it is a balance I will never get right. I pull myself in so many directions on the subject, but so too do the people in my life. I hasten to add that they do it for the best of intentions. On Wednesday for example, a Senior Medically Trained Person gave me a slight telling off for doing too much, and by doing too much, I am apparently making my fatigue worse. It is not my interpretation of my life but what do I know? I studied modern history, not medicine.

I could go on and on about this until the end of time, but that’d just be a waste of my energy. And so, I will end this. I need to rest my head.

EJB x

P.S. I promise that Part III will be like a double expresso with a pound of sugar, as opposed to this, which I would compare to a two day hangover. Everyday.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Mashed

Hello there and welcome to Part I of, let’s say, two blogs about my brain function. I assume it’ll be in two parts; I have not written them yet.

The first post will be something of a downer as I describe what it is like to exist with constant Chemo Brain. As a romcom sort of girl however, I intend to pick things back up in Part II with an inspirational story of how I manage to fine some respite from my brain’s drug induced default position of blurry shapes.

So, back to the downer that is Part I…

I need to be clear about something that is commonly misunderstood. Fatigue as I know it now, is not just limited to tiredness. Of course tiredness is a big part of it, but there is so much more to it. So much more that is hidden from your view.

Essentially, my brain is straining and I know it is straining. In the last two months, as my fatigue has increased, so too has my inability to concentrate, think, remember and reason. Don’t get me wrong, I am not sitting at home all day long unable to tie my shoe laces. That’s a bad example, for I actually cannot do up my show laces, but that is not because I do not know how, it’s because my back forbids it. My recent days and weeks mostly blur into one big lump, where time passes quickly, with a noticeable lack of cognitive brain function and imagination. My time passes quickly and yet I do not know how, nor can I recall any use of something I once knew as ‘imagination’. I miss it.

This blog is a good example of my inability to think. When this all started, as much as I noticed that the drugs were frying my brain, I could still form sentences that did not always include ‘of course’, ‘so’ and ‘obviously’. Writing was easy. It’s not easy for me now. I like to think that I am rather witty, but realistically, after a glance through my most recent posts, my wit may well be in my past.

Believing something is better than nothing, I will continue to stick to the same old vocabulary to keep people abreast of My Myeloma developments, even though I know the content is becoming dryer than my skin post radiotherapy. I sit down to write a blog and more often than not, a blankness takes over and what I want to say cannot be said because the words just bounces around my head. If I can overcome that particular hurdle, I then find that the act of writing things down, something that remains important to my overall wellbeing, uses up my daily thought allowance. I blame this for my current, simmering level of madness. That is my story and I am sticking to it.

Waking up one day and realising that your ability to communicate is not what it once was, is not something to relish nor welcome.

After some thought, I still view my treatment as a means to an end, but the truth is, my treatment comes at a big cost that few people recognise and I can quantify. All I know for certain is that I cannot help my boringness, I plead with thee.

I watched a film last weekend, I will not tell you the name of it because I am about to give away a big part of the plot. One of the characters is accused of running somebody over with his car and his defence is that he cannot remember doing it. Why you wonder? The answer is Chemo Brain. An actor playing a doctor actually says ‘Chemo Brain’. Now, I have no intention of running somebody over in a car, I cannot look at my blind spot anyway, but it made me think, slowly, about the losses I have had to deal with on my current treatment… I do not think that the plot development I mentioned is implausible.

I am backing this blog up with examples, silly examples maybe, but examples all the same, so that you do not think I am exaggerating or feeling overly maudlin. When I say that my days blur into one, and that I have a limited concept of time, that is not an exaggeration. Big Sister told me off a few days ago because I had not spoken to her for a week. If somebody had asked me about this prior to our conversation, I would have said that the last time we spoke was a mere few days before the question came ‘where have you been?’. The answer of course to that question was ‘I don’t know’.

Last Monday, I attended a two hour lecture on the Freudian concepts of Eros and Thanatos in modern cinema. Cultural for sure. The following day, I knew that Thanatos meant death, but I could not remember the word. I had to look it up five times before it stuck and by Wednesday I had forgotten the word again. Right now, if I think really hard, I can remember the titles of three of the six films discussed.

I used to have a good short term memory. Past tense. My brain now seems to be built for one man shows because I cannot remember multiple names in one go. A few weeks ago I watched a film in the afternoon and come 20:00hrs, I had no recollection of what the film was. In my defence, the film was terrible.

If modern technology did not exist, if I did not walk around with constant access to Google in my pocket, I would be a word beginning with ‘f’ and ending in ‘d’. I am constantly making notes and scrolling through my messages to see what I have said to the various people in my life. I live in a constant state of fear that all my conversations are the same and people are just too polite to tell me that we have already spoken about what it is we are speaking about the last time we spoke.

There is an obvious side effect to the side effect of which I speak. It’s called monotony. Do you know what monotony does? It makes a person boring. Dare I say it, it makes a person tedious. My worry? It has made me tedious. Of course, nobody will say that I am a god awful bore, at least not to my face, but they can and will think it. My phone records would probably back this up.

A month ago a friend of mine told me off for asking so many questions in conversation. It plagued me for a week or so, until I realised that it is something I do now to firstly enable me to actively participate in a conversation. Secondly, having thought about and asked a question, I am more likely to remember the answer. It is a far from ideal way of engaging.

It has, in my brief myeloma voyage, never been as severe for such a long period of time. Reading has been a constant difficultly and the chances of following the plot of Game of Thrones were significantly reduced the first day I took morphine, but there is so much more to it now. I want to be able to articulate myself. I want to remember to reply to messages and phone calls. To allow the former, I would be greatly assisted in knowing how long a day is. And finally, I would very much enjoy recalling information mid conversation without feeling the need for a celebratory fist pump.

As Part I draws to a close and on the eve of two transplants, my main questions are, how much worse can it get and how many people will still be around at the end of it?

EJB x

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Feel The Burn

On the first day of radiotherapy, way back when on 21 August, I was told that the treatment may cause some ‘skin irritation’. I was also told of this ‘skin irritation’ when I went in the week before my treatment starting for my planning and when I met with the Medically Trained Person who decided to give me the treatment in the first place. I did not heed the warnings. I mean really, what is a bit of dry skin when one faces the daily challenge of bone pain, whilst taking a hefty dose of chemotherapies?

On 21 August I was given a small tube of aqueous cream to apply to my back. At the time, I thought that the request was quite laughable because I could not touch the area of my back where the cream was intended. Reclaiming the ability to touch my lower back without wincing was one of the reasons I was there in the first place. I got the impression that this was lost on the radiographers. Given this slight practical issue, which I was not going to ask somebody else to do for me, and the fact that I did not experience any ‘skin irritation’ when I had radiotherapy in October 2012, I took an educated risk and decided not to apply the cream. As some of you will be aware, I spent much of the radiotherapy era vomiting and feeling less than sexually desirable, so I had little energy to consider whether the skin on my back was turning to leather.

You might have guessed the outcome of this already, but with the beauty of hindsight, I can say that my decision was a mistake.

I made a big mistake. It is an itchy, red, sore and flakey mistake, covering my lumbar region, which decided to reveal itself four weeks after my treatment ended.

IMG_0619-0.JPG
See?

It revealed itself at a time when I could not seek immediate medical assistance, so I wisely decided to self diagnose the affliction on the Internet . After a quick panic stricken detour via images of plasmacytoma, I concluded that I had a radiotherapy burn made worse by somebody who shall remain nameless, accidentally scratching the wound in question. Despite my sound medical knowledge, as soon as was practical, I sought medical advice. That was yesterday.

Yesterday, contrary to my informed self diagnosis, I was asked to seek immediate medical intervention because the symptoms sounded like shingles. To keep you up to speed on what one should avoid post transplant, a diagnosis of shingles or it’s sister chicken pox are right up there in the panic inducing bracket.

I consequentially spent two hours yesterday feeling like a leper. My visit to the hospital had to be prearranged so I could be taken straight to a private room to protect the ‘transplant patients’. I wanted to stamp my feet a little at this statement and tell the Medically Trained Person who arranged my visit that I too was a transplant patient and was all to aware of how risky shingles could be to others as well as myself. I went to the cinema instead.

So I did not alarm anybody, as in other patients and their family members waiting patiently for treatment, I had to whisper twice in reception before I was quarantined into a dark room watching Jeremy Kyle, desperate for a cup of water because I put too much chilli sauce on my steamed bun prior to my arrival at the hospital. For this reason and my potentially contagious state, I desperately tried to avoid kissing a patient’s wife but failed. It was most stressful. Thankfully, after a quick inspection, a Medically Trained Person concluded that I do not have the shingles. I have a radiotherapy burn made worse by somebody who shall remain nameless accidentally scratching it. The area was described as ‘angry’.

It was an experience almost as exciting as the time they thought I had herpes.

An hour later, I left the building with antihistamines (aka the best sleeping pill ever), menthol aqueous cream and emergency antibiotics should my back become infected. I still cannot fully reach the wound without feeling like my back will snap, so I suspect for the next week at least, I’ll be sporting a permanent grease stain and dirtying my bed sheets.

The lesson I take from this latest myeloma treat is that just when I thought I knew everything there was to know and had experienced everything I could experience, something else comes and bites me almost in my arse. And the panic ensued…

EJB x

P.S. I do not understand why the aqueous cream has to be menthol flavoured. It’s zingy.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: