Category Archives: St Bartholomew’s Hospital

Out Of Sorts

I have now had two doses of Daratumumab, and contrary to earlier theories, I am struggling to find my feet with it. As I write this, my last dose was on Thursday, four whole days ago. And since last Thursday, I have been feeling, how do I put it… out of sorts. ‘Out of sorts’ is the polite way of putting it. It’s the sort of thing a family would say in a post war drama set in a remote village, who are attempting to shield their neighbours from fact that their matriarch cannot stop kissing the wallpaper. I haven’t been kissing the wallpaper, I don’t have any wallpaper, but I have, as I said, been feeling out of sorts. I do not know what happened during my 12 hour visit to St Bart’s on Thursday, but since then, I have been feeling uncontrollably, unreasonably and inexplicably out of sorts. 

As somebody who used to enjoy a drink or five, I was able to diagnose myself almost immediately. Without any doubt, I can say that for the last four days, I have been feeling uncontrollably, unreasonably and inexplicably anxious. 

Anxiety is not my friend. Forgive me for pointing out the obvious, but it has never been my friend. Back in my pre myeloma life, I was familiar with this level of anxiety. That’s why I know that I do not deserve to feel this way now. Once upon a noughties,    at my very worst, I would have gone out on a Friday night, drank far too much to be deemed a lady, delivered to persons unknown a healthy dose of generous mouth and then rounded off my evening by doing something I should not have done with somebody from my office. I would then have to wait until the Monday morning for everything to be at peace in my mind again. In the meantime, the alcohol I consumed would trick me into thinking that the world, that’s right, the World, hated me and that everybody I knew was laughing at me. Not only was everybody laughing at me, they all thought me a simpleton. At least back in my days of drinking, I would have had, initially at least, enjoyed myself. The alcohol fuelled anxiety was a payoff for having fun. On Thursday, I did not have that type or any type of fun; this feeling of anxiety just engulfed me and it has been my constant companion ever since.

Why I ask? Why, indeed.  I had a counselling session last Monday and I felt fine. I even commented that I felt like I had nothing to talk about because everything seemed to be so, under control. Famous last words. Tentatively at least, I was managing the beast that is My Myeloma. And then, Thursday came…

Thursday’s trip to the hospital was not easy, in fact, like my visit the previous week, the visit was frought with uncertainty. The day before, I was told that the IT system at St Bart’s was down, which meant that once again my drugs could be delayed. The threat of another delay spun my head into multiple directions (that usually happens when one is ‘spun), but understanding that these things can happen, I encouraged myself to stay calm. By the close of play on the Wednesday, I was told that the Pharmacy had my prescription and all being well, and with a sigh of relief, my treatment would go ahead as planned. I arrived at the hospital the following day at 10am, and I could immediately sense the problems this IT issue had caused. The handwritten sign in the waiting area saying ‘all chemotherapy will be delayed by 2-3 hours’ was also something of a giveaway. 

I was shown to my bed for the day 30 minutes after my arrival. By midday, I had yet to have any tests done, seen any drugs, had a cannula fitted or been told anything about the plan for my day. I thought my day would have followed a similar course to my first day’s treatment. I could see that the Medically Trained People were stressed, so I resisted being too much of a nuisance but by 1pm, I had pressed the magical bell twice to see what was happening… It was not forthcoming. Mamma Jones was due to pick my up at my flat at 8.30pm, so I was ever mindful of the time. My friends delivered my lunch around this time. I have little memory of this, but I know what I ate and that they refused to take any money from me. My friends are nice like that. 

It was around 2pm that medical things started to happen. The cannula went in and I was given my pre-meds. Unlike the previous week, where I was under near constant monitoring, okay that was an exaggeration, hourly monitoring, monitoring had significantly dropped off in comparison. My memory is a bit hazy, and I’ll get to the reason for that shortly, but I think the main infusion started around 3-3.30pm. Before my treatment could start, I was told that I had to be booked in for a bed for that night thus causing a further delay, although I was told that I wouldn’t actually need said bed, because they had started too late for me to be treated solely by the Daycare staff. 

Only with the benefit of hindsight can I see that this environment might be the reason I was on edge. I like a timetable, and whilst I realise that My Myeloma is unpredictable,  the timetable I had for that day went out the window before I even arrived. The plan for Mamma Jones to pick me up and take me back to the land of the Fens was by that point on Thursday afternoon also under threat. I remember thinking if that was under threat, would future weeks be similarly uncertain. And then, a panic set in. 

This might be the time to say that prior to last Thursday, if anybody had asked me how I felt about my first dose of Daratumumab, I would have told you a story about how it left me with 3.5 good days a week. In fact, so certain was I of how the treatment made me feel and how it was going to fit into a week of my life; I would have told them about the blog I was writing entitled ‘3.5 Days’. 

My first dose of Daratumumab was on the 20 April (you can read all about that 10 hours of bliss right here https://ejbones.wordpress.com/2017/04/22/day-1-take-2-part-ii/). I suspect it was a result of the 20mg of Dexamethosone taken prior, but for some reason I was extremely tired in the days that immediately followed my treatment.  The 10 hours I was in the hospital would also have played a part in the sleep that followed. By Sunday 23 April, I felt back to ‘normal’. Well, as close to normal as my body allows.

So there you have it, it was all so simple. Based on one whole week of funny feelings, I felt safe enough in my assumption that I would now be giving up 3.5 days of my week to my treatment and I was able to start telling people about it. My plan, my weekly schedule, would all being well, look something like this:

• Every Wednesday morning, I am required to go to St Bart’s for blood tests – 0.5 days

• Every Thursday would be taken up with treatment – 1 day  

• Every Friday and Saturday, I would be in bed getting over my steroids – 2 days  

All in, I had calculated 3.5 days a week given to My Myeloma treatment and 3.5 days a week for myself. I enjoyed how the title of my non-existent blog had two meanings. Depending on how you fill your own cup, one could read the title as 3.5 good days or 3.5 bad days. Evidentially, it doesn’t take much to entertain me. 

Back to the Thursday at hand, and I could see this plan, this schedule I created for myself very quickly, slipping away. 

I do not know if it is a management technique when I get frustrated with things going slowly, or if by Thursday afternoon I was genuinely tired, but I soon found myself snoozing. The environment of a chemotherapy daycare ward, makes for a very broken sleep. This resulted in me confusing my dreams with reality, which as time has gone on, I realise added to my anxiety. Even now, I do not know if conversations I had with my lunch time visitors and a later visitor actually happened, or if I dreamt them.

Sleep normally relaxes me, but my sleep on Thursday, despite making the time go faster threw me into a state of confusion. At the time, I recall telling somebody that I did not know what was real and what was not. No wonder I still feel out of sorts.

I’m not shoehorning it in, I think this nicely brings me on to another cause or should that be contributor to my anxiety and that is my drugs. I am on a lot of medication and although none of these have changed in the last week, I cannot help but think that one or some of them have set my teeth on edge. At the bare minimum, the drugs could be the reason I was in and out of such a broken sleep. The broken sleep has given me that same feeling I used to have after five too many drinks. I feel I was rude to my friends and I feel like they are were disgusted by me. I have checked with them, and I wasn’t rude and I did nothing to create disgust. And yet the anxiety still exists.

Tricks are still being played upon me. Even today, I feel irrational. I could describe my irrationality at length, but I think all you need to know is that I am still out of sorts. 

I wish I could put my finger on the cause. I’m fairly certain that my friends do not think I am a cretin and that those who visited me on Thursday did not leave thinking I was metaphorically kissing the wallpaper. I keep telling myself it is only my medication, much like I do when I am on my steroids and I can feel myself about to blow. This feeling is not me. I am embarrasssed by my uncertainty, and I hate feeling vulnerable. 

This doubt is not me. 

This anxiety is not me.

I wish I could finish this blog with a conclusion, with an ending to this particular story, but this is real life. It’s my life and things do not fit neatly into a box. I can tell you that I left the hospital shortly after 9pm last Thursday and the parting words from the Medically Trained Person was that there has to be a better system for getting and admitting the Daratumumab. For my sake, I sincerely hope for this to be true.  

I need some structure. 

EJB x 

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Day 1, Take 2 – Part II

A Timeline:

07:00hrs – I wake up, once again, I have been waking up on and off for a few hours. At 07:00hrs, my bladder told me that I could not lie in bed anymore. 

07.05hrs – I returned to my bed and took my morning dose of medication including the one that sounds like a mountain retreat. I then dilly dally. 

07.30hrs – Despite my hairdresser’s recommendation to wash my hair every four days, I decide that a wash is completely necessary and I sneak into the shower before Housemate emerges from his room, so I cannot be told off for making him late for work. I’m sure you can work out what happens next, but for the sake of accuracy, I put on the first of my day’s outfits once I get out of the shower. 

08.10hrs – This is an approximation, but Housemate leaves for work. In the time before his departure, I change my outfit once and ask for his expert opinion. He does not offer an expert opinion, so I change out of the extravagant kimono and put a black shirt on over my jeans and body. I thought subtle and comfortable was probably for the best.

08.25hrs – Ocado arrive and I spend the next 15 minutes struggling to get my goods in to the fridge. Said fridge looks magical when I am done, I almost feel like a grown up. 

08.40hrs – I cook my porridge. I then eat my porridge. At this point, I think I have plenty of time and I am convinced I am going to leave as planned at 09.15hrs, to ensure I arrive at the hospital by 10.00hrs. I then decide to watch an episode of TOWIE. Forgive me for that.

09.15hrs – I am not ready to leave on time, but I have managed to locate a cardigan that has been missing for two days.

09.30hrs – I book my Uber, but somehow find the time to take a photo of Bruce.


09.46hrs – I find the time en route to share this wholly necessary piece of information.


09.55hrs – I arrive at the hospital, make my way up to the 7th floor and check in.

10.10hrs – A Medically Trained Person comes to collect me, takes me through to Bay 5 and shows me to my bed to the day. On my arrival, I unpack my bag. I plug in both my chargers, unpack my laptop, kindle and iPad, find a spot for EMan and hang up my cardigan and handbag. I also pull a chair over to create an extra table. I did all of this completely obvious to the fact that the nurse was waiting to do my observations. Despite knowing that I had hours to make myself comfortable, I just wanted to make myself at home right away. I needed order. I didn’t just want to make myself at home by the way…


The first of several obs were then taken. Do not worry, I am not going to share with you every time my obs were taken. That’s mainly because I did not keep track of how many times my obs were done. Just know that they were done on the hour, and then before and after each infusion or change in speed of said infusion. That is a lot of times for somebody to take my temperature, pulse, blood pressure and oxygen. 

10.45hrs – In goes the cannula. My concerted attempt to drink as much liquid as possible all morning, proved worthwhile. The cannula went in on the second attempt on the top of my right hand. Don’t worry, I did not take a photograph of this. I know some people can be squeamish around needles; thankfully, I am not one of them. 

11.23hrs – The pre drugs start. 


They consisted of one bag of Piriton followed by a flush, then an 8mg bag of Dexamethosone followed by a flush. Sometime after that, I then get a 12mg bag of Dexamthosone on the instruction from the pharmacy. Once again, this is followed by a flush. 

This all takes some time and delays the start of the main attraction.

12.43hrsIt starts!


Look at the size of that bag! To begin with, due to the possible side effects, the Daratumumab is given to me very slowly. It speeds up gradually throughout the day, but not for the first two hours.

13.30hrs – Lunch has arrived and I start to feel nauseous. I am also dizzy. I’m trying to fight it, but aware of the warnings that I should report any changes, I tell the Medically Trained People. They do my obs.

13.49hrs – By now, they have discovered that my oxygen is low, and I am given oxygen.


15.00hrs – My visitor leaves me and I am once again left to my own devices. Prior to her leaving, she is kind enough to collect my drugs from the pharmacy, which required three trips downstairs. The first trip was to put in the prescription, the second was to collect said prescription and the third was to pick up my morphine which she was not allowed to collect without ID.  Whilst she was gone, I took advantage of the bed next to me being empty. 


I spent the rest of the afternoon feeling exceptionally hungry. I also started to watch the bag, willing it to empty. 

16.30hrs – the Daratumumab was turned up to maximum speed; with still many, many hours to go. My Medically Trained Person reminded me that I had my laptop with tv programmes on to keep me occupied. I repeatedly promised to turn it on. 

17:00hrs – I am given more drugs to take home. The previous prescription collected by my friend was for my pain management, this prescription contained support medication for the trail. It included Dexamethosone tablets, which I am required to take for the two days after each infusion. 

17.30hrs – By this time, I had turned on my laptop, I really wasn’t paying any attention to it as you may be able to tell from the photograph below.


I now lose track of how many times I restart said programme. I was tired and hungry. All so very tired and hungry. Hunger was controlling my mind. 

18.31hrs – By this point, all the other patients are gone and I am still hungry. I give in to the hunger and do something I would not usually do. 


19.30hrs – More obs are done prior to this, but by this point, the Daratumumab infusion is  over. Finally. The drugs are inside me and there is nothing else to be done. Well, there are things to be done. The Medically Trained Person has things to record, more fluids to give me and obs to take. On a personally level,  I have to pee again. At this time, the sodium docusate I take every day has also decided to work. When sodium docusate works, I cannot deny it. As a result, I spend the next 15 minutes in the toilet. 

20.00hrs – The last obs are taken, I have packed up all my belongings and I am ready to go. The Medically Trained Person asks me how I feel and I respond with ‘tired’. She admits that I do look tired but complements me on the fact that my lipstick is still on. 

I leave, against medical wishes, but I feel confident that nothing is going to go wrong in the next 24 hours (or in the days after that).

20.06hrs – I get into my Uber and for the next 20 minutes, I have to listen to complete and utter drivel from the mouth of the driver. In then end, I explain that I cannot talk to him anymore because I have been having cancer treatment for the last 10 hours. He continues to talk. He gets 2 stars.

20.28hrs – I am Home!


I greet my lads and put my dinner on. I then get straight into my pyjamas. I also investigate the bags under my eyes, to see if I do truly look tired. I can confirm that I looked tired.


21:00hrs – I eat. In bed. I then take my medication.

02.05hrs – I wake up to go to the toilet and find my TV is still on. I appear to have fallen asleep during Masterchef. I turn the TV off and fall immediately back to sleep. 

And that my friends and people of the internet, was my day. You can tell that I became increasingly tired as the day progressed, as I stopped recording my day as accurately as I would have liked. I think I still show that it was an incredibly long day.

Until next time…

EJB x

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Day One, Take 2 – Part I

I woke up on Thursday morning in exactly the same way I woke up the previous day. I did everything I did on the Wednesday morning, right down to eating porridge for breakfast. – Quick interlude, I just let the dog out for a pee and it reminded me that there was a difference on Thursday morning, I had a supermarket delivery arrive between 08.00-09.00. It was due at a more reasonable time, but I had to change it because my treatment was postponed. You might think that this is an unnessary detail, but having a full fridge brings me so much joy. Anyway, back to my story –  If I was following my superstitious mind, I would have shaken the routine up a bit, but for reasons unknown, my brain had decided to behave; I was calm. I did not feel that nervous. I might have had a tiny, tiny bit of trepidation somewhere in my gut, but my predominant feeling was quite optimism. I just woke up wanting to get on with everything. In my flat that morning, I was more of a robot. That said, I did change my outfit twice and I asked Housemate whether I looked okay on both occasions and he responded with a sterotypical boy answer of ‘I don’t know’. I’m not sure why I was getting dressed up for the Daratumumab, I just needed to feel confident. Or at least fool myself that I felt  confident. I might have even fooled all of you.

Once again I felt the need to share my day on Instagram, it had two benefits. As well as sharing with strangers the glamourous and enviable life I lead, it also kept track of the day’s timeline, so I didn’t have to remember them for this blog. I’m thankful for that because it ended up being a long long day at the hospital. I say it ‘ended up’ being a long day, I always knew it was going to be a long day, I just didn’t compute the reality of it. 

If you count my waking hours it was an even longer day.  In terms of hours out of my house, I was out for 11 hours, and in the hospital for 10 of those. I didn’t even do rfar for my friends’ weddings. I woke up at 07.00 and past out at 22.30, so I was awake for 15.5 hours. I’m not normally awake for 15.5 hours and I am even more surprised that I managed to stay awake that long after having some IV Piriton. That would usually send me straight to sleep, but then it was followed by 20mg of Dexamethasone, so that probably counteracted the immediate need to snooze.

As you may have worked out by now, I got the Daratumumab. Pause for your applause. Despite having an hour and 20 minutes of pre meds before the big  infusion, I did, when I was in the seat for a brief moment begin to doubt that I would ever see the drug. Even when the Medically Trained Person told me that pharmacy had called her and said it was ready, I still had  doubts. Completely irrational doubts, but they were doubts all the same. When I eventually saw the bag and confirmed my name and date of birth I was excited. Internally, it was an internal excitement. When the bag was eventually hooked up to me, I sighed with relief. It was a theatrical sigh, but if was the only way I could think at the time, of commemorating the occasion. I was officially on the trial, and apart from the Medically Trained People, I was the only person to see it. 

I should add at this point that Mamma Jones felt (and probably still feels) terrible about not being able to accompany her baby girl for her big day of treatment. Mamma Jones just couldn’t get the day off of work, which I understood completely. Mamma Jones on the other hand felt guilty. I think she must have felt the guilt a lot because she was very apologetic on the Wednesday about not being able to come and then she phoned my twice on the Thursday to say she could come after work if I needed her.  People have to work, and I knew that my Mum would have been there for my first infusion if she could have been. It’s just one of those things, we planned family cover for the Wednesday, but as you know things changed at short notice.

I explained in my previous blog that Big Sister could not come to London for the big day, take two. The lack of family members present did have my two main female family members in a spin. Fortunately for me, there actually exists people who live in London who care about me, so when I found out I was going to be family-less, I contacted the London family and immediately I had a volunteer. I had a simple task for them, and that was, in addition to entertaining me for a period of the day, to bring me lunch. I had seen the hospital lunch the previous day and decided that just would not do. If I was going to be in the hospital all day, I needed to eat well. If in the process of bringing me lunch, my friend wanted to stay and talk with me a bit, then that was okay too. I understand that this offered my mother some reassurance. 

Whilst we are on the subject of food, I arrived at the hospital with a handful of cherry tomatoes, an apple and a flapjack. The flapjack was for emergencies. My friend was arriving at one, and in addition to my actually lunch of sushi (please do not complain to me about eating raw fish, my counts were fine, and I am adult) and a bowl of miso soup, I asked her to bring a punnet of tomatoes because the tomatoes I packed had disappeared into my mouth  by the time my infusion started. Despite a brief feeling of nausea, timed perfectly for the arrival of my food, I spent the rest of the day absolutely ravenous. It was fortunate for my waistline that I was attached to a drip and under such stringent monitoring, because I would have gone on a search for more food otherwise. I probably would have had one of the free sandwiches if they had done a late afternoon visit, such was my irrational hunger. As my stocks dwindled to nothing, I even had to lower myself to a custard cream and I hate a custard cream. You do not need to know, correction, I am unwilling to tell you what I had to eat when I got home. I need to maintain an air of elegant mystery. Next Thursday, I am going to have to rectify the hospital food situation. I am going to need a bigger bag. 

I had heard a lot about the reactions I could have on Daratumumab, which is one of the reason why I had to be monitored so closely. The other reason, I guess, is because it is a trial requirement. I know I started this paragraph talking about reactions, but I think I should just add here that I think I won the clinical trial nurse jackpot, I mean, if there was such a thing. My nurse was probably with me for 4-5 hours of my 10 hour day, and the biggest complement I could give was that I enjoyed her company. I also liked that she brought me drinks and made toilet jokes. Anyway, after yet another brief interlude to the narrative, I can confirm that I experienced no major side effects. 

If I had experienced any major side effects, I can confirm that the hospital was well prepared for them. They even had Mamma Jones and Big Sister’s contact numbers so they could keep them up to date if I became indisposed. I also had the nurses’ bell to hand and my Medically Trained Person’s phone number should anything change. I was well covered.

The only issues I had was some light dizziness lasting about half an hour shortly after the infusion started, which coincided with some nausea, which unfortunately coincided with the arrival of my lunch. My oxygen also went down, so I got to have extra oxygen shoved up my nose for good measure. As soon as I had the oxygen, the nausea and dizziness past and I was able to eat my feast, which if I am being perfectly honest, is what I cared about the most. 

Although I was there, on the same bed for hours, I must admit that the time until about 17.00 went by so quickly. From then on, it went slowly, but this tied in with all the patients in my bay going home, the cleaners cleaning around me and the sun go down. In the last three hours, it felt very quiet and lonely in that room, which is strange because I had spent most of the day mentally lambasting the other patients for making noise, especially the one, who at one point had six very loud visitors. I missed them all once they were gone.

I did not start watching my TV programmes until about 18.00 and even then, I only watched half an hour of one show, that I kept having to rewind because I was distracted by my phones or simply because I was tired and struggling to concentrate. I had to postpone Line of Duty because I was beginning to feel very tired and I felt that I would be unable to give it the attention it deserves. I will have to review my viewing choices before next week. Maybe Disney would be more suitable.

I really do not know how I managed to fill 10 hours of my day, when all I did was sit on a bed. A lot of my time was spent on my phone. I was inundated with messages from my friends and calls from my family, which when added to the two hour visit from a real life human friend meant that I felt well and truly supported. I received my weekly call from my UCLH CNS, a Medically Trained Person who always, I feel, goes above and beyond what is required from her when it comes to supporting me and for that, I am most grateful. I also wrote one of these, which takes more time to complete than you can imagine. On a more practical level, I was also very thankful for packing a phone charger.

The infusion bag was huge, and prior to receiving that, I received a bag of antihistamine, two bags of Dexamethosome, because the pharmacy changed my dose halfway through the first infusion (thus adding a 30 minute delay to my day). Each bag of drugs was followed by a flush. I should have, but I did not record the size of the Daratumumab bag, but just trust me when I say it contained a lot of liquid. On top of the liquid going through my veins, was the liquid going through my bladder. The Medically Trained People kept offering me more refills of water and top ups to my herbal tea. Plus, I had a clear soup for lunch. All this means one thing, and one thing only. I needed to go to the toilet a lot.

Going to the toilet whilst attached to an drip with a cannula in your dominant hand is no easy feat. It is especially difficult if you have aching bones and struggle to get on and off anything. The first time I went, I did not realise that the line was long enough for me to get off the left hand side of the bed, so I had to lift my legs, one by one and squeeze them between a gap mid chair. Such gymnastics was necessary because the table was attached to the bed, cutting the right hand side of the bed in half with a metal pole. Thank goodness two of my curtains were closed when I did this. On my return, I realised I could get on the bed from the left hand side, negating the need to negotiate the pole and more crucially, negating the need to look stupid.

The trial dictates that patients are monitored for two hours post infusion. My infusion ended at 19.00 hrs and as I had had no major side effects, I asked if I could leave at 20.00hrs. This was against medical recommendation, but I was hungry and tired, and the Medically Trained Person said she would not have left me leave early if she thought anything further was going to happen. And so, I left at 20.00hrs, got in an Uber and instructed Housemate to put the oven on, so I could heat my ready made cottage pie, which had arrived that morning.

There isn’t much more to tell you. I was absolutely exhausted yesterday and I do not know if this is because I was out of the flat for so long or because of the medication. I imagine it was a combination of the two. I was the sort of tired where every activity felt like a marathon. I was mortified to discover that I had incorrectly spelt ‘belatedly’ in a birthday card, by brain just wasn’t working properly.  Needless to say it was a flat day. I imagine that today too, is going to be a flat day. 
The reassuring thing, at least I find it reassuring, is that although I am still tired from my treatment, I know that I get to do it all over again next week. For those of you who are interested, I have to go in for tests next Wednesday morning, ahead of my treatment on Thursday. I imagine after a few more doses, my excitement will fade and Daratumumab, like every other drug I have taken will become routine. I just hope, with ever ounce (and there are a lot of them) of my being, that this treatment and this investment does what we hope it will do. 

EJB x

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

The Glitch

On Wednesday morning, I woke in childlike excitement ahead of what was my first day on the Daratumumab trial. It’s was Day 1. Finally Day 1. Before waking up properly at 07.15, which is virtually unheard of these days, I woke up multiple times from 05.00. I just wanted to get to the hospital and see the infusion going into my arm. The night before, I had anxiously packed my day bag, even going as far as washing my backpack, so everything was truly ready to go. The backback was full of every possible form of entertainment I could wish to get up to as well as some I would not; I had even purchased a dual headphone jack so that Big Sister and I could spend the time catching up with Line of Duty. So as not as to tempt fate, I had also packed pyjamas and clean knickers in the event of me having to stay in. I was good to go. 

Once up, I made myself a proper breakfast to start such a big day right, which had to  fit in with my morning drug routine of waiting an hour before eating and then once my stomach is full, taking another hefty batch of pills. Were you aware that I had to do that everyday? I also took something called Montelukast, which sounds more like a mountain resort than a drug to relieve allergic reactions, perhaps the patent holders were just being inventive that day. I also did the things that everybody does before leaving the house of a morning, and it seems rather boring to describe them to you here; just use your imagination and know that once I smelt so fresh and so clean, clean and was presentable, I covered my lips in lipstick. 
The only downside of being out all day, is seeing the disgusted look upon the dog’s face when he realised I was not getting back into bed, but this is just something he was going to have to live with. I gave him a guilt treat before smothering him in kisses,  and struggling into my Uber with my extremely heavy backpack and a tightly closed bottle filled with 24 hours of my urine. And off I went to Bart’s. 
I was so excited, and also aware that there would be many occasions where I would be bored throughout the day, that I decided to share said excitement on Instagram Stories.

Exhibit 1: As you can see, the excitement was undeniable and not in the least bit egocentric .

Exhibit 2: Truly this was not in the least bit designed to get people’s attentions and to make them think of me as they go about their respective days. 

So, I walked through those doors, put my body and it’s tapping foot in a seat and waited. I had already told the Medically Trained Person in charge of my care that I was running a whole 8 minutes late, so I waited patiently for her. By that time, Big Sister was on the train from Peterborough and would be joining me by my bed at approximately 11.30.  

To fast forward a bit, the next Story I uploaded, was as follows:


Exhibit C: Yep, it was true instead of arriving home after 20.00, I arrived home at 14.00. Bruce was excited; I was not.

I suppose I have to rewind to the waiting room. My nurse came out to see me and very apolegetically explained that there had been a problem on the computer system for the trial and said computer system was preventing the hospital’s pharmacy from making and issuing the Daratumumab. It was a Glitch. A very annoying glitch. Due to the length of time it takes to give the Daratumumab via infusion, if the glitch could not be sorted by 11.45, I was going home. As have already seen, it is no big reveal to say I ended up going home with my head bowed in disappointment.

I’m not entirely sure of the precise reason for the computer glitch, I was assured that everything had been agreed verbally. I was on the trial and the trial sponsors were happy with my addition. The computer was clearly not happy. There are many reasons for this. One could be that the trial had been closed and reopened for me (I did not know that this was the case) and the compute could not compute this. Secondly, somewhere down the line there had been an admin area. Thirdly, it was just a plain old computer problem that nobody will ever get to the bottom of.

Sorting this problem was time sensitive, which meant the biggest issue the Medically Trained People had on Wednesday morning was the fact the computer glitch originated in the good old US of A. At that time of the morning in UK, there wasn’t many people or should that be the right people to help fix the problem by our deadline in the US. So, despite Big Sister arriving and confirming that she could not come the following day, the kind people at St Bartholomew’s were left with no other option but to send me home when the clock turned 11.45. 

To say I was disappointed was an understatement. Since hearing of the trial and knowing the stakes it has for me, I have been loathe to talk about it too much because I did not want to jinx it. I have no idea when I became superstitious, but it was probably some point around August 2012 when I was diagnosed. The reason I was late arriving to the hospital was because I suddenly decided I need to wear my Granny’s old necklace that says ‘luck’ in Cantonese. By the time we walked out of the hospital, I did realise the irony of my necklace.

Outwardly fine, but inwardly panicking; I asked if this meant there was any chance of me being removed from the trial and I was told ‘absolutely not, I was on the trial’. With that Big Sister felt much better and I felt marginally better. I am not sure if she was trying to calm me or if she genuinely believed it, but Big Sister remained poised and not remotely angry the whole time. It may be a result of her NHS training but she just said that these things happen and she hoped that the treatment could go ahead as planned on Thursday. That my friends, is a calming influence. When I initially called my sister on the train to explain the problem, she said “oh well, it would still be nice to me [blank] (blank is my trial nurse)”. 

Inevitably, at 11.45 we left the 7th floor waiting room and made our way to pharmacy to get some more Montelukast for that evening and the next day. Talking the drug was dependent on me getting a call later that day saying the treatment would go ahead. Once the pharmacy dispensed it, Big Sister and I treated ourselves to some lunch so her day was not a total waste, and then we parted ways. She was heading back to Peterborough and I to my flat and to the dog.

It was when I got back to the flat, alone, clutching my phone with the ringer on the loudest setting, that my irrational panic set in. The silence made my mind wander. Wander is to soft a word, my mind galloped.  I think my concerns were best summed up with this piece of marginally frantic primary evidence:


Exhibit 4 – Irrational panic 

So, yes. On Wednesday afternoon instead of feeling tired, wanting to go home to my own bed, I was willing to feel tired on a disinfected bed. I was also doing mind gymnastics, as shown above. In my defence, when you have had received the amount of bad news I have received, these irrational outbursts can be expected. I was very aware that it was irrational, and I received sympathy and logic from pretty much everybody I spoke to or by text. I didn’t need to be told I was being stupid, because I was telling myself that already. I just needed a gentle stroking, so to speak, not an actual stroking though I might have found that relaxing too. 

At around 16.00 hours my phone rang. I don’t think I gave it the chance to go beyond one full ring but it rang. It was confirmation that the computer glitch had not been sorted, but the folks at St Bart’s had made it very clear to the folks somewhere in the US of A, that I had to start my treatment as soon as possible. Something they agreed to; the human override. 

So, I was to start my Thursday in the same way I started Wednesday. Montelukast, other pills, shower, clothes, breakfast, lipstick, heavy bag, an Uber, and arrival at the hospital by 10.00. The only difference was that this time, I would be doing it without a family member, much to their disappointment. Mamma Jones even phoned me to say she felt guilty, I told her not to be so ridiculous. I had arranged an alternate to bring me lunch and I reassured her that I would be fine. As soon as The treatment started I would be fine.

With slightly less confidence I fell asleep on Wednesday. I still managed to feel some excitement that I would eventually, after what felt like months of waiting, see the trial start and witness the drug I really struggle to pronounce go into my arm. I have small dreams and that was one of them.

What happened yesterday is for another blog, but find some comfort in the fact that I was in the hospital for 10 hours yesterday and I feel extremely tired today. This blog only comes so early courtesy of my need to take some Dexamethosome after my breakfast, and I cannot have either of those things without an hour wait.

EJB x

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

10 Hours In London

Following my latest Bad News Day, I’m not sure if we can classify it as the Ultimate Bad News Day, but after whatever a fortnight ago was, things started to happen very quickly. Last Friday evening, when I had a chance to stop, I reflected that I could not believe so much had happened in a simple space of a week. As you can assume, it was a riveting conversation. A lot happened that week, but for this blog, I am only going to tell you about what happened on Monday 3 April. Firstly, it means you’ll have to read the following blogs and secondly, I enjoy the WordPress alerts that say ‘your stats are booming’. Well done, all 100 of you. I deserve more than 100 of you, but again, that’s not the purpose of this blog.

Mamma Jones and I departed Peterborough on the 10.08 train that day for an appointment at St Bartholomew’s Hospital at midday. At this point in time, I was not entirely sure why I was going to Bart’s. The last I heard was that I may have got into a trial at the hospital and I was going there to talk about it. Initially, I had thought that this appointment would take place a week later, but the hospital wanted me in as soon as possible and when you are dealing in possible clinical trial spaces, I was willing to do whatever the hospital wanted me to do. Even if that meant getting up early and getting a train to London, when all I wanted to do was rest my aching bones. 

The familiarity with returning to St Bart’s was overwhelming. The clinic I was attending started at 9am and my appointment was for midday. On a very practical level, this meant that waiting would be required as the clinic would have had three whole hours to run late prior to my arrival. 

The waiting room in the East Wing had gone unchanged. I don’t know why I was expecting it to have changed. I lie actually, in my absence they had upgraded from lukewarm jugs of water to a standalone water cooler that dispensed more lukewarm water. The room itself, still holds far too much heat and there are still insufficient seats to accommodate the number of people who attend that clinic. People seem to sit wherever they can find a ledge. It looks so untidy, with patients sat incredibly close together on plastic seats, facing various directions whilst other patients sit on the seats fashioned from oversized window ledges that are too deep to be sat on with any type of decorum. Wheelchair uses find space next to the window seats, but there is no designated spaces that would indicate an area where a wheelchair user has stopped on purpose rather than just finding themselves next to a plug in heater in the middle of a corridor. Needless to say, it is an environment that feels cramped and overbearing. My previous visit to Bart’s had been about a year before. Desperately trying not to moan, the oppressive nature of the room, and my imagined but fierce belief that plus ones would never give up seat to a young myeloma sufferer, immediately put me in a bad mood. 

I tried to read, I thought perhaps reading would make the wait seem more bearable. Not that I knew what I was waiting for. Reading proved to be impossible because that room carries sound that I could not escape from. Any conversation that did not originate from my lips on that day, was pure and utter, superficial nonsense. My attempts to read just encouraged me to look at the other patients and declare them evil for interrupting my novel. Housemate dropped by briefly during this time to deliver a much needed packet of Refreshers. They helped. But we were still waiting. 

Maybe I was being too dramatic in wondering why we had been summoned there. Logically, I knew I was there to discuss the trial and hopefully get on to said trial. I know what my problem was, I didn’t want to get in to see the Medically Trained Person only to be told that it was all a gigantic mistake, that I wasn’t on the trial and that I must have misunderstood something four days previously. This trial literally is my chance to prolong my life. I did not want to hear about any mistakes. . 

Irrational concerns about my hopes being dashed after nearly five years of having myeloma, are not so irrational. 

I was eventually called through at 1.25. It was time. Time for what though? We did not have a clue. 


Like I said, we did not know what to expect. Was I going to have to pass a number of tests? Was there a written word exam nobody told me about? Would the Medically Trained Person not put me on his trail if I started to have a hot flush and as a result of hot flush leave a damp mark on his chair? I just did not know. I was not privy to any of the discussions that led me to Bart’s. 

So, up the river without a paddle, I walked through the double doors, followed by another set of double doors until I reached a single door and knocked. The Medically Trained Professional opened that door and  in we went. 

Inside his office, ready to greet us was a Medically Trained Person I know well. He, my doctor throughout my last transplant, was smilin, actually smiling at me which made a refreshing change from the previous week’s tears. I am a simple woman and I appreciated the familiarity. I’m surprised he did not automatically call me ‘Em’, which had had started to do when I was last under his care. 

I would categorise what followed as informal. We did not have an in depth chat about the clinical trial (Daratumumab). I was told that there was around a 30% chance of it working. I reasoned that that 30% was better than trying nothing at all. The word ‘antibody’ was mentioned a few times but not enough that I actually understood why. Then, probably within five minutes of us entering, the Medically Trained Person signed a white piece of paper and said that was his consent for the trial. 

Could it be that without any blood tests, biopsies or an explanation, I was on the trial? Apparently so. Even now, I loathe to jinx it.

And with that, I think I expressed enormous gratitude, and then we were ushered out of the office with a few sheets of stapled white A4 paper containing a very important signature, and that was it. Well, it wasn’t quite it, we still had to go and see the trial nurse, but that was it for our time with the doctor. Clutching the consent form  and looking at my mother in disbelief, we made our way up to the seventh floor of the main building, otherwise known as the cancer centre. 

St Bart’s cancer centre, despite the view was just as foul as I remember. We did not get past the waiting area on our visit but that area was filthy. There was rubbish everywhere and unhappy people sitting amongst yet more plastic chairs waiting to be called through. I do not know if I imagined it, but I am sure there was actual rubbish littering the waiting area and mug rings decorating the tables. I did not imagine that the adjoining toilet I used, was soiled with stains all over the floor and toilet seat. How does this happen by 2pm in the afternoon? I know that people are sick, but really? What does it say when patients don’t respect their treatment area enough to keep it clean? I’m not going to answer that because I am very thankful to be transferring to Bart’s and I think it is a wonderful Hospital. 

This s a blog about how much I love St Bartholomew’s Hospital and not one where I highlight all of it’s faults. I really do love St Bart’s and I am pleased about being transferred there. Honest. Honestly. 

Amongst the debris, Mamma Jones and I read through the literature I had been given and then I signed my life away, consenting to everything they asked me to consent to. A skim read would be the correct description of what I did. I was beginning to get tired. Since I was diagnosed with Myeloma, I have consented to many things and I can confirm that there was nothing exceptional about this form. Let’s hope the subject matter proves to be exceptional, but the form itself? A form is a form is a form. 

After a few minutes, we met the Clinical Trial Nurse. Not that I am picky in anyway nor does she have massive metaphorical shoes to fill when it comes to making me feel comfortable with my care, but I approved. We discussed the practicalities of the trial and I handed over the stapled bits of A4. 

I was then weighed (dropping a full half kilogram from my morning’ weigh in), measured and my blood was taken. And that was it. I was sent home. Practicalities, like the start date of the trial were to be decided once my dates for radiotherapy had been confirmed.

Was that it? Was that all that was needed to get me onto a trial that has a 30% chance of prolonging my life? I do not not know what I expected. I did not even get the chance to express my gratitude to such an extent that it made everybody feel uncomfortable. I didn’t learn about the ins and outs of the trial. I just stipulated that I did not want a semi-permanent line and said I still wanted to be able to go on holiday. 

It’s now over a week since that appointment and I still do not want to do anything endanger my place on the trial. As the rest of our correspondence has been done over the phone or by email, I am afraid that they are going to discover something catastrophic. It doesn’t even need to be catastrophic, it could be something perfectly innocent that could effect my place on the trial. This week I almost took some extra steroids, and even those could have impacted on the trial. 

It cannot be taken away.

On the subject of steroids, no tale of our day in London would be fully complete if I did not tell you what happened after we left the hospital. By 3.45pm, I was absolutely ravenous. By that point I had been on a high dose of steroids for four days, we had missed lunch and I really was ravenous. Well, I was tired first, hungry second but I knew that if we fed the hunger, Mamma Jones would be accompanied by a much nicer me on our journey home. 

We went to a restaurant and I am most thankful that the restaurant was quiet, for I sat down and ate a starter of calamari followed by half a chicken and chips. Once I was finished with my chicken, I finished my mother’s. Mamma Jones’s chicken was not included in my half chicken tally. I couldn’t stop. The least said about this meal the better, but in short, I could not stop eating. Afterwards, we travelled to Kings Cross station where I indulged in yet another banana milkshake. Then, and there was a then, when we eventually arrived home at approximately 8.30pm, I had a bowl of porridge with Jersey milk. Steroids

Steroids are responsible for a lot.

Straight after I ate my bowl of porridge I fell asleep and I stayed in bed for the next 36 hours. Our 10 hours in London, wiped me out. I know that it is understandable, but I was still surprised the following day to find myself incapable of getting out of bed. The exertion was worth it. Meeting with the staff at Bart’s and albeit briefly discussing the next steps made me feel like things were moving quickly and they were moving in the right direction. I know that the odds of this working are extremely low, but I feel positive about it. Well, I feel ready for my treatment to start and I am not going into it thinking it’s going to fail…So, yes, that’s something. 

I cannot quite believe that I am on the trial. I do not know how these things work, but I know that in terms of criteria and timings, I am lucky. I know that Myeloma patients don’t get ‘lucky’, I’m fortuitous. 

I know (because people have told me, not. because I have done any of my own research) that it is incredibly difficult to get on any dartumumab trial in the UK and it is for this reason that I will not let myself fully believe that I am on the trial. I might have signed the papers. I might have  completed the pre tests (I haven’t actually completed the pre tests, I still need to do a 24 hour urine sample). I might have been told that I am on the trial. I just cannot, until I watch a very slow infusion enter my body this Wednesday believe that I am really on the trial. At that point, I might doing a celebratory fist clench and feeling a tiny bit lucky. 

EJB x

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Man Flu

“Post transplant, you’ll have a weakened immune system”

😷

Quick! Live in a bubble to protect the weakened immune system. The thing with a weakened immune system, even when I am told that my blood counts are misbehaving,  I cannot see or feel any evidence of supposed misbehaviour. My knee bone is connected to my thigh bone, but how is my immune system connected to the stranger who coughed as I walked past them last week? I can feel my back pain, Graft Vs Host Disease and my daily bouts of nausea. I can care about those things because I can see how it all connects in the world of My Myeloma. I take a pill and the pain reduces or if I walk too far, the pain increases. What makes one person with a sniffle the epitome of mortal danger when a person with a passing cough is a mere annoyance? 

A weakened immune system means I am more likely to catch bugs and sneezes than a healthy person. I apologise for stating the obvious, but sometimes, I need the reminder. It also means that once I catch a disease, it takes much longer than I would wish and expect for my body to fight it. An added disadvantage of getting one of these spread diseases is that my body might not even be inclined to fight it. Instead, it might just welcome a few other dirty friends into my cosy camp of a body and then I’ll be stuck spending the next few weeks being reminded that there is a reason I am prescribed two inhalers.

Regarding my immune system, I might not give it too much attention, but I do what I am told. I do not go to public swimming pools and lick the tiled surfaces and I will not eat without washing my hands. I avoid public transport during rush hour and I avoid touching people if I know they are feeling unwell. That said,  my concessions to my immunosuppression has their limits. I am sensible yes, but I refuse to walk round with a surgical mask and gloves on.   
My theory on this subject is that exposure to some germs is good for my repertoire.  Also, I want to live a reasonable life and living in constant fear of the common cold is  not normal, and seriously, how dangerous can a stranger’s cough be? 

The answer to that question is, of course is ‘quite dangerous’. I have discovered this the hard way. To my embarrassment and severe frustration, I have recently discovered that despite not being able to feel it, smell it or even notice it, my immune system can bring my life to a standstill. What started off as a cold, has brought my life to a standstill. 

Approximately 21 days ago, I developed a light sniffle and a sore throat. Two days after that, I experienced a few days of sickness and diarrhoea. The latter are not out of my ordinary, so I assumed it would pass soon enough. A fortnight ago, with my bowel seemingly back to normal, I spent my weekend suffering from lethargy, a loss of appetite and what appeared to be a throat full of knives. Every day, I would convince myself that I was improving. 

After 10 days of feeling slightly rotten and once again, spending too much time in bed,  I thought I best inform the Medically Trained People. The symptoms I had, could have been an infection or Graft vs Host Disease, so I thought it was about time I was sensible and got a second opinion. I loathed the idea of a second opinion. If I did not have myeloma and if I had not had three transplants, I could have just moaned about feeling poorly until I did not. Maybe I could have talked my friends through the varying colours of my sputum on Facebook. I would not have had to go to the hospital for tests…

The following day however, I did just that and took myself to St Bartholomew’s Hospital for tests, because I do have myeloma. Upon arrival,  I christened the building with some red tinged vomit and was informed I had a temperature of  38.5. I was poked, prodded, x-rayed and I was told that I was going to have to be admitted and given intravenous antibiotics as a precaution. I thought it was all a complete overreaction, so I bartered with them. I got the Medically Trained People to let me go home, after I had some fluids and antibiotics, and all but pinky swore that I would come back over the weekend if it got worse. I promised them that I was a very sensible person and I was most definitely capable of looking after myself…

… It turns out, I am a liar.

That Friday evening, I got home shortly after 18.00hrs, climbed into my pyjamas and then my bed and I did not get out again until Monday morning. The only times I did venture out of my pit was to run to my bathroom and produce some vomit that contained blood. I drank and ate nothing. On the Saturday, the hospital called and told me one of my tests had come back and I had Influenza B. Proper flu. As I had the ‘official’ flu, I had to come in the next day to collect some medication. Sunday morning came and I could not get out of bed. Housemate said it was pathetic. I did not need him to tell me I was being pathetic. I really could not get out of bed. Who knew the flu could completely floor me? I have had transplants, I should have been made of sterner stuff than that. 

It’s just so ordinary.

😷

By the Monday morning, I had drunk less than a litre of water since Friday. I was groaning. Literally groaning. What had started out as something small, something I did not want to make a fuss over, had somehow become something that required actual, real life, medical attention. Seeing that simply willing myself to improve was no longer working, with Housemate in tow, I made my way back to St Bart’s. I had an appointment I failed to brush my hair for, let alone source lipstick for. I did not not look my best. The lack of hydration had caused my lips to crack and the inside of my mouth to bleed.

To cut a short story even longer, we went on to see a Medically Trained Person who looked at me and simply said “oh, Emma” and promptly told me that I was going to be admitted. I had lost over a stone in a fortnight. I was transferred to a private room on a ward. And in that room I stayed for four days. I vomited more blood, I had several bags of fluids and I rediscovered the joy of Mackie’s vanilla ice cream after the anti sickness tablets had kicked in.

  
Apparently, it was necessary for me to be kept in isolation. I did not see a member of staff who was not wearing a surgical mask for the length of my stay. The flu had not only taken me down, it had heightened all my GVHD symptoms. It meant more drugs, more waiting and more lost days. Wasted time, spent alone in a hospital bed. Bar an hour a day, my only company was my laptop and the faceless staff who interrupted my sleep.

I have been out of hospital for five days now, and I am still a pathetic little weakling. I am still embarrassed and angry that I have a body that required hospital admittance for the flu. I resent the fact that even though I am out of hospital, I have been told it is going to take a few more weeks for the infection to go. 

To put my frustration into some sort of perspective, Big Sister experienced a similar illness to me at the same time. She was coughing and sleeping and generally feeling unwell. Sound familiar? Like most otherwise healthy people, she went to her GP and was prescribed a course of antibiotics and was sent on her merry way. I’m jealous that that was her experience compared to mine. In addition to my hospital stay, I required two chest x-Rays, daily blood tests, multiple bags of fluids, nasal and oral swabs, two different types of antibiotics, an inhaler, thrice daily nebulisers, steroids and ice cubes.

😷

It’s experience right? Hospitalisation for the flu will one day be a funny anecdote I can tell my friends’ kids about. When I tell it, I’ll leave out the part/s about me feeling sorry for myself that at the age of 31, I am considered a vulnerable person who cannot tend to herself. In the future, my story will also include something about being lucky that the NHS cared for me and, with acknowledgment to my stupid weakened immune system, an awareness that it could have been much worse. There are many people, far braver than I, fighting seemingly unrelated side effects of cancer as I type and you read. 

We might be lucky enough to get a remission, but, having ‘cancer’ never reallygoes away. 

😷

EJB x

Please note that real flu and a cold/other bugs are very different beasts. The memory is raw, liken  them in my presence at your own risk… My cousin said they always say the difference between real flu and a cold is whether you would get up to pick up a £50 note! Take that with you.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

N.B.

On the days when I feel like there is an improvement in my mental capability, I remember that my mobile phone device is full of  blogging material of questionable quality. It’s a responsibility, for I then feel tied down to telling what a lesser person would deem an uninteresting story, whilst simultaneously knowing that I personally, will feel instantly better for sharing and recording, in a way that can never be taken back, whatever the particular shit myeloma has thrown at me during x amount of time between blogs. 

As the earth has continued to rotate, I gave at least managed to hide the evidence of what could form a blog in my iCloud account instead. I guess today is one such day, I have some sort of energy, except, I started writing this blog about ten hours ago and so far, it looks absolutely nothing like I anticipated it would when I started morning. I am fairly certain for example what this will be the only time I mention NHS meals.

Of late, My Myeloma stories are overflowing in my virtual world and my actual mind, and not on my blog. Few people know just how many days I have spent sleeping in a room occupied by strangers or how many times I have been put to bed. There are times I am so confused by it all, that the easiest thing to do to manage it, is to fall asleep and forget it ever happened. I am not even sure what my reality is 100% of the time. I would have no clue at all if I didn’t attempt at least to try to maintain a record. I need a record of this. I want a record of the times I fell asleep mid sentence, or when I canceled plans with my friends and I cried myself to sleep because I saw no end in sight. Hell, I even want a record of my most recent and nightly nightmares. 

Right now, I’m experiencing something new almost daily, and yet I’m not fully documenting it, as I had once documented before, because the something belonging to my sister that entered my body three weeks ago or so (see I do not even know the day) seems to be killing off all my two autos later, surviving, brain cells. 

I have had four weeks of treatment,and of course we are running very close to a certain three year anniversary, so there are no shortages of tales to tell.  I want to tell them but it’s getting close to medication time.

Almost everything I have experienced since my allo commenced is ‘blog newsworthy’ (people write blogs about Stephanie Meyer’s arm hair right?), I just haven’t quite worked out where the energy is to tell you about it. Know I plan to, it might just come later than I actually experienced it.

I used to think that a late blog would be something of a disservice. If a blog was written out of anger for example, like the half written one I found the other morning, time gives me the ability to calm down, to compose myself, and omit the need to rebuild any of those metaphorical bridges that might have been damaged mid rant. On the downside, by waiting, it takes away that raw emotion, the raw emotion heightened by my inability to eat raw foods, and I feel a little bit like I am making things sound easier than they are. I feel like it makes me sound more composed than I am, when I am really not. Not only that, less blogs I dramatically reduces my site’s statistics and my ego likes the notifications. 

If there is one thing I have experienced a lot of since I started frequenting St Bartholomew’s Hospital everyday, it is raw uncensored emotion. Perhaps the fact I am too tired to blog is stopping me from writing something I would regret at a later date. It’s not a lie, it’s just presented a different way. That is what I keep telling myself when I look at my ever growing list of half finished drafts.

I cannot give you any specific examples, for that would really negate the need of this temporary notate bene. Hypothetically, however, I might have written something negative, something along the lines of;

There is still time to jinx this procedure by talking about it now and I most definitely, most adamantly, most whole-life-depends-on-it-do-not-want-to-jinx-this. But and that is a start a sentence with a capital ‘B, But, I do not like Saint Bartholomew’s Hospital. 

And then the hypothetical thought better of it… Like I said, I did not write that down, those thoughts are imagined. If somebody did hypothetically wake up one morning and write that down before they even got up to go to the toilet, I am sure they had good reason for doing so and it wasn’t because she felt the nursing assistance was slightly rude that morning… Hypothetically. Similarly, so too, could something like this have been said, despite me never actually joining any of these words together to make a cohesive sentence;

Every time I have experienced Red Thumping Rage over the last 17 days, I have felt like a teenage brat in great need of a reality check, a slap round the face, a smidgen of gratitude and a slow play replay of the NHS part of the 2012 Olympics opening ceremony.

I could even have imagined images of clutter or me sleeping. Maybe, like I said. I do not know. The negative portrayal of a scientific marvel does not sound like me. 

  
  

I love everything remember? I think my care is great. I love talking about myeloma and myself, and I cannot wait for the time when I have the effort to do it properly, with a proofread. Until that point comes back, we get what we get. 

It’s much like the unpredictable bowel.

EJB x

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: