Category Archives: Support Network

The Fear – Part II

You have stopped responding fast enough to traditional Myeloma treatments’.

Fuck. 

Few things warrant the use of such foul language, especially in the written form, but a ‘fuck’ or a ‘bugger’ is definitely suitable in the situation I found myself in last Thursday afternoon. I didn’t say it out loud; I was still able to maintain some level of decorum.

I think I know what that statement means. It’s not the worse news I could have received, but it is not far from it. It wasn’t what I was expecting. It is a polite way of saying that my treatment isn’t working. Not working. Stupidlyhow could I have thought my treatment was working when I was in so much pain? In fact, after my first full cycle on the recently licensed drug I was on, I told a Medically Trained Person that I did not think it was working. I wish, with every weakened bone in my body that I was wrong. I wasn’t. 

 Am I dying? 

I don’t think I thought all of this or processed it when I was in the Medically Trained Person’s office.  I was in shock and I was trying to hold myself together. I didn’t hold myself together. I couldn’t speak, not initially anyway.  The first words I uttered, did not sound like fully formed words. It was an explosion of emotion. I tried to say that I wanted my hip fixed but that became a sob about how overwhelmed I was with the news. That’s right people, in this circumstance, I simply chose to yelp ‘I am so overwhelmed!’. Then I sobbed. It was not a cry, it was a snot-producing, face-pulling sob that was softened when I saw the tears in the eyes of the Medically Trained Person.  

I haven’t had long enough.

Thank goodness for my Big Sister. I had no doubt that she would step up in this kind of  situation and step up she did. I think I had become deaf to what was happening around me. To me, everything that happened in that room was a blur, but she wrapped me up in metaphorical love and got on with what needed to be discussed. It could not have been easy for her. It is one thing to be afraid of something, but facing that fear head on, whilst holding somebody else up, is on another plain entirely. I know that it was not just my fear either. What is happening to me, what was said in that room, is a fear held by everyone I know (and happens to like me). I will readily admit that I lost control. For the rest of that afternoon I repeatedly tried to compose myself, but failed miserably. I didn’t know that tears could flow so uncontrollably. Nor did I know that I was capable of talking such complete and utter drivel. But, for the rest of that afternoon and evening, I had my sister sitting next to me, looking after me and discovering the many benefits of a banana milkshake.

Am I a failure?

Anyway, let’s move on from this emotional mumbo jumbo; we have some real business to get to. In a nutshell, despite three stem cell transplants and many, many rounds of treatment my disease is currently active and my paraprotein is on a rampage. It is so active that I have to have radiotherapy on the distruction it has created in my body. Whilst the drugs I have been taking including the one I changed to in January are doing something, the cruel circumstance is that they have not been doing enough. This leaves the question I asked just a few months ago, what else is there?

Is this the end of the line? It now seems an almost rhetorical question. 

I do not wish to bore you with the history of Myeloma treatments, largely because I’ll reveal how little I have chosen to know about it. I’ve been deceiving, most of you will know far more than I do on the subject. For where we are in my story, all you need to know is that new myeloma drugs tend to be derivatives of older drugs. They are related.  This means, in a shake-your-head, we’re-out-of-ideas sort of way, the Medically Trained People do not think that such medications will work on me for much longer. It’s hard to process that, I almost have to sound it out in slow motion. And then repeat it. And repeat it again.

There are too many things to say about all of this and I don’t have the distance or the benefit of an adequate pain and drug feee sleep to eloquently describe how I feel. I know I am angry. Since I was diagnosed, I did everything I was asked to do. Almost anyway, I haven’t lived in a complete sin free bubble, but I have lived and I have done what I have been told to do. I took my various treatments, I coped with the disappointment after disappointment and still, I get out of bed almost every day and take the pills I have been prescribed. Yet it has still gone wrong. I used to joke that given my age and the flocks of people trying to help me, that I was a medical marvel. I willed myself to be, terrified that I wasn’t. It now transpires that the only thing marvellous about my treatment history is in how powerful my Myeloma has been. Perhaps I should have gone gluten free as one nosy Parker once offered as superior soundbite.

I do not believe in any kind of divinity. I have nobody to prey to and nobody to blame. A stranger once told me that my lack of faith was the reason I had cancer, but let’s face it, there are a lot of knobs in this world.  When I add it all together, I just think something bloody awful has happened to me and no matter how much I have fought it and continue to fight it, it’s stronger than I am. Long gone is my bereavement for my lost children, old age and a picket fence. My fears now seem so much more urgent.

I don’t know why this happened to me, but for the last week, I have felt ashamed. I know that I did not bring this on to myself, even if I do love white bread too much. I do not believe that somebody’s willed for this to happen to me. And yet, I feel like I should have told my body to do more. Fight harder. Forget about being polite and smiling at everyone, I should have been a total bitch, constantly in attack mode like the scary army captain I met once in the cancer centre who made me cry when she announced it was her sheer willpower that caused her continued remission. I have willpower. I have multiple reasons to live, and yet I currently live in a world where I cannot do up my shoes.  

I should have reacted better to my medication and treatment plans. All those odds, all those odds and I was always on the wrong side. I’m angry that all of this is making me think about what this world will look like without me in it. I didn’t realise I have so much to lose. I watched my mum run around after me at the weekend, making me food and making sure my neck was adequately supported by my pillows, I listened as my nieces nervously tried to make me laugh as I tried to rewind my tears, as their Mum tried to keep us strong, and with every vibration, I could feel my friends trying to cheer me up or express their anger. I feel like I have let all of them  down. 

I made so many half promises about my treatment. This one will work. We will go on that trip. I can make it to that pub. Seeing the waves of broken promises scatter around me is my new definition of fear.

But what the hell is all of this? I cannot stop yet. I must not stop yet.

The Medically Trained People aren’t quite ready to stop and nor should I be. Last Thursday, when Big Sister’s concentration powers really kicked in, I was told of a clinical drug trial at St Bart’s involving antibodies. I could give you the medical blurb, but I think I should save that for a rainy day. All you need to know is that it is completely separate to all other treatments I have had. It might work, it might not, but the space on the trial could be mine. It took a few days, but I can now firmly say that I take back everything negative I have said against that hospital. 

A lifeline. 

It may sound foolish, given my very limited options, but the thought of leaving the comfort of UCLH once more added to my devastation. That hospital, in both my successes and failures have held me up. I have no other point to make on this subject, but it’s important. Ever the pragmatist however,  as I said last week, I think I said it anyway, if it is not clear to you yet my memory is a haze; ‘it is what it is’. I have to get on with it. 

On top of all that has come before this,  we had to discuss my need for radiotherapy. The practicalities. You can imagine how long this one clinic appointment felt. So much to take it in, so much to fathom. Ahead of last week, when I was suffering from worry filled sleepless nights, I thought the good and bad news hinged on the what was found in my MRI.  Clearly they did not, and now it seems easy to forget that I need some fairly urgent treatment. I have something in my neck that shouldn’t be there for crying out loud. And yet, the radiotherapy feels like it has become secondary to the ‘big news’ despite how quickly I have once again found myself increasingly immobile. 

I do not know if it is in the form of lesions or tumours or the generic term of bone disease, but I require treatment in my neck and my hip. The area in my neck has caused the majority of my recent problems in my upper back and my arms. Again, this may sound minor, but wondering why and how I have lost the sensation in half my hand for the last month, is a blood-curling. To even consider how the knee bone really is connected to the leg bone is mind blowing. If anybody has seen me move in the last month, you would have witnessed how much this pain has made me squirm. The pain and this is something that has not happened in a long time has been at a cry inducing level. I have cried not because I feel sorry for myself, I mean I have done that too, but because the physical discomfort has been so great.

It’s a juggling act though. As I am now due to start a new treatment at a different hospital, my doctor was reluctant to also zap (a term I have used a lot over the last week when discussing my radiotherapy, mostly because I can use an emoji) my pelvis. It may lower my blood counts and it will make me feel groggy, but even in the whatever state I was in last Thursday, I knew I needed my hip fixing. To get through my next, I have to be as fit as I can be.

I think it goes without saying, but the last week has been a whirlwind. It doesn’t feel like a week. In whatever timeframe I am now working in, and I guess it is a new timeframe now, I feel like my world has been turned upside down. I have so many things coming from so many directions, that I laugh at the meagre everyday complaints I have been able to read on social media. I used to think I was a great multi-tasker, but when it comes to affairs of my life, and the time that is left in that life; I do not have the foggiest.

I have to give myself a few passes. Firstly, I have been put on a ‘pulse’ of steroids, that is controlling my pain and will hopefully hold the myeloma whilst the Medically Trained People are doing their juggling. It is a ten day course of as much steroids as I can take. That’s right, ten days, decreasing by half every other day. It’s a well known fact that I cannot take a lot of steroids, but to put it into perspective, the first day’s dose was more steroids than I usually take during a full cycle on my old treatment and each weekly dose of that put me in bed for two or three days. I am awaiting for the inevitable crash increasing alarm and dread.

Secondly, I am currently on a lot of pain medication including sedatives. I basically rattle. 

Thirdly, I am once again struggling to look after myself more than I usually struggle to look after myself. I cannot bare weight in my left arm, my right arm is starting to go the same way and every activity, whether it is washing, eating or cooking seems impossible. In this mindset and the physical prison, I have to arrange my forthcoming radiotherapy sessions and attend the necessary testing for the clinical trial. And don’t think for one second, I have done any of that without my lipstick on. On Monday, which again is a story for another day, Mamma Jones and I spent 12 hours in London waiting, meeting new people and satisfying my steroid induced hunger. Today, I have seen a doctor, looked at some scan results, been measured and had two radiotherapy tattoos. 

Lastly, I just ask you to add everything up, consider everything I have said in this here blog and attempt to fathom where on earth I can begin. I have to begin somewhere after all. Welcome, to another volume in my possibly soon to be ended story of my life. 

To clear my head, Mamma Jones took me on an epic adventure to a National Trust property last Friday. I thought you might appreciate the evidence that I am still here. Getting out of bed.

So, there it is my current story. It’s not cohesive, it’s all over the place because I am all over the place. It’s new. It’s daunting. And my goodness, it is fucking scary. 

EJB x

P.S. Kudos, and I mean bucket loads of the stuff must go to my Medically Trained People and the NHS in general. In just seven days, they have seen me transferred to St Bart’s for (hopefully) the start of a clinical trial. UCLH somehow got my name into the mix of said clinical trial and St Bart’s seem to be moving whatever needs to be moved to accommodate me (no jinx yet though). They have also liasied with the radiotherapy department, resulting in an appointment today which included all my pre treatment measurements, ensuring that all areas requiring treatment are attended to. The treatment for which is starting tomorrow and will conclude next Thursday.  I have no more words in me to describe my gratitude.

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An Almost Quarterly Update

You may be wondering, ‘what the hell has Emma been up to?’ I wouldn’t blame you if you are, my life is an unpredictable rollercoaster of super fun times that many people would wish to emulate. It is for that reason that I don’t keep my blogs up to date and not because I am too tired, stuck in my bed and unable to follow the plot of Pretty Woman… Sure, I can always dream. The closest my life could come to a rollercoaster would be the teacups, where one goes safely round and around  finding the occasional thrill within the monotony, let’s say, like waving to somebody you know each time you pass them as the teacup swirls.

I’m being  a little harsh. I had a jam packed February, one that has left me feeling exhausted, sick, frustrated, happy and satisfied in equal measure. It was jam packed for me, jam packed for somebody who spends at least two full days a week in bed and has 4 good hours a day on a good day. Looking forward to it, way back when in January, I thought my plans impossible. 

Before I explain my month of (relative) excess, I should tell you what is happening with my body. Spending so much time in bed, measuring time by cycles, I struggle to fathom actual time now, but for the sake of this story, let’s go back to November. I realised that my paraprotein level was no longer falling as quickly as I would have liked. The dastardly thing had started to plateau, which by January meant the Medically Trained People took as a sign that I should be on a different treatment regime. It had stopped working after all. It was a decision that made sense to me, but worried me at the same time. It may have plateaued but on the other hand, it was not going up, could a new treatment offer more?  

In all of this, I am unable to forget that myeloma treatments are not infinite. There are only so many treatments that exist and if I work through all the possibilities available at a 6 monthly pace, what does that mean for my longevity? 

I’ll let you think about that for a while, because I have been thinking about it for a long old while. Three failed transplants and another failed treatment; I do not think it is pessimistic to put two and two together and work out the obvious. Though, I imagine my nearest and dearest do find my arithmetic something gloomy.

On the other hand, I do not think it is healthy to dwell, so let’s move on. 

My new treatment was introduced at the beginning of January. Unfortunately, I caught Influenza A, which is a bog standard flu to the masses, but in me, it meant everything had to stop. It meant isolation and face masks. Points must be awarded to my CNS who decided to swab me after I fell asleep in the waiting area, despite my protestation that it was only a slight cough and I was fine. Catching it early meant that the anti flu medication worked, meaning it only took me a fortnight to get over the flu instead of the six weeks it took last year. I was also able to suffer from my own bed instead of a hospital bed, for which I am most grateful. 
As an aside, following this experience, I will inform the Medically Trained People of any new ailment as soon as I experience it. Well, within 24 hours later. Maybe 48 hours. What I am trying to say is that I will not try and manage it alone now, the consequences of a slight bug are not the same as they once were. I must use my common sense and being a martyr does not equal common sense as much as I think it makes me look like a badass.

So, I got over the flu and once my throat and nose had been swabbed once more, I commenced my new treatment. I am sure scientifically there is a difference, but practically there is not a great deal to distinguish between a regimen of Revlimid, Dexamethasone and Ixazomib and a regimen of Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone. I still take one of the drugs nightly for three weeks, with one week off. I still have to take steroids weekly and I still feel rotten as a result. On the plus side, I do not have to deal with the sickness caused by the Ixazomib. The downside is that I have not had a paraprotein result from the new treatment yet and thus, I do not know if it is working. 

The last month has made me pause to consider whether said drugs are working and that is not just because I am plagued by pragmatic pessimism. I am in more pain than I was in December. I hope this is a result of over exertion in February. The jury is out on that one.

I am not the sort of cancer patient who reads up on new treatments and overly questions the Medically Trained People. I have chosen to trust them, rather than invest my energy trying to find a better solution. Some may disagree with this approach, but that is how I manage. I only mention this because Pomalidomide has only recently been made available as a regular treatment in the UK and I did not know this. It makes me hope that there will be new drugs and combinations of drugs, that will broaden that scary finite list that I (and so many others) am a hostage to.

Prior to last week, I had been on constant treatment for five weeks instead of the usual three weeks and I could certainly feel the difference. It felt like everything about me from my brain to my toes had slowed down. I don’t think my recent fatigue was helped by starting my new treatment straight after the flu either. Just trust me when I say, it has been exhausting. 

Despite the dense fog of exhaustion where I found myself for almost the entire month, I have had an exceptionally time of it. My compromised body handled February pretty much the way I expected it to handle it. With difficulty.

I was honoured to be invited on a Stag Do, taking place in Amsterdam. Yes, a Stag Do. That’s positively normal behaviour for humans of my age. I thought long and hard about all the issues I would have to face, weighed up the pros and cons. Limited walking, early nights and limited energy compared with the 21 able bodied thirty somethings also going we’re definitely high on the ‘con’ list. All of it pointed to not attending, but where’s the fun in that? Giving in to it, no way Jose!

Inevitably I scrimped, scraped, borrowed and I went. That act alone felt rebellious. I also travelled without medical insurance cover for the simple reason that I could not afford  a Β£260 minimum spend for a three night trip. That wasn’t rebellious, it was reckless and it won’t be something I would dare repeat, especially to a location covered in snow and ice. I usually live in a world where I would not step out of my front door if there is a mild frost. It meant as great a release as my trip was, I could never fully relax because I feared something would go wrong. I had even planned a contingency of Mamma Jones driving over to Amsterdam to rescue you me, were something to have happened to me.

Prior to the trip, I decided that I would loom knit a hat for each attendee. If you were still wondering what I did for January and the first 10 days of February; the answer is hats, lots and lots of hats. Sitting on my sofa making hats. Dreaming about hats.  I think it was a project that whilst garnering a great deal of personal satisfaction for being able to complete such a task, it put me on the back foot energy wise before my busy February even began. I gave myself no time to relax because I was proving a point that did not need to be made. 

I won’t go through everything I did in Amsterdam. Just know that it was a tonic. A very large tonic. I never once had to lift my suitcase and whenever I left our accommodation I felt protected by a group of bodies who were almost as worried about me slipping on the ice and breaking a bone as I was. It is quite different going away with a group of friends then going away with one’s mother. If there was a secret test, my friends certainly passed it. In a nutshell, the only person to make me feel like there was something wrong with me, was me.


This computer in Amsterdam said I was Happy. It was correct.

Leaving Amsterdam, walking through the airport, I realised that my body had done all it could. I feel for the person walking with me to the gate as he was met with a constant whiny chorus of ‘I can’t walk anymore, I can’t walk anymore’. On returning to London on a Tuesday evening, I got straight into bed, took my nightly dose of chemo and my weekly dose of steroids and stayed in bed until the Friday. I had to leave temporarily on the Thursday to go to a meeting, but that required Marvel Studio-like strength and resulted in the most horrible feeling of weakness that had me yearning for my bed.

On that Friday, the one where it took me until 15.30hrs to have the energy to get out of bed despite my cleaner trying to change it, I was due to travel out of London for a wedding. For somebody that has four hours of energy a day, on a good day, this was a mammoth task. Gargantuan. I was not going to miss the wedding however, it was too important and I too stubborn for that to have been a possibility. Somehow, and I really do mean somehow, because I have no idea how I achieved this, I managed to pack, shave my legs and meet my friends at our car rental for 17.30hrs.

Once again, like in Amsterdam, I felt fully protected by the people I was travelling with. They were so considerate of my limitations, I felt like I was getting my energy through them. They drove me to my hotel, financed said hotel and just made the whole thing possible. It made it possible for me to watch a dear friend get married, with my body only giving up two hours before the wedding was due to end. Give up it did. With all the excitement, drugs and post Amsterdam fatigue, by 22:00hrs, talking was proving to be impossible. Walking, from an afternoon of standing and not putting my feet up, had slowed to a shuffle accompanied by constant pain from my pelvis to my neck. Unavoidably, having lost my ability to speak and most of my leg function, I had to leave.
This is me posing next to, I do not know what, at said wedding. 

Leaving early made me so angry. There are times when I tolerate my body, but crawling onto my hotel bed trying to make a nest of pillows large enough to ease my pain, I hated my body. I was embarrassed by it. I was annoyed that I could not speak to the friends who where there as much as I would have liked because my body had automatically switched to battery saving mode. Whilst in that mood, I also became irritated that the same rules applied in Amsterdam. I may well have got the most I was capable to get from it, but I did not get to experience everything on offer. Myeloma always makes me feel, even temporarily, that no matter how much I participate, that I am on the outside looking in. 

Fortunately in this instance, I took 10mg of Amitriptaline and I was able to have some resemblance of a reasonable night’s sleep. Waking not to a feeling of melancholy, but to a hangover mixed with pleasure that I was invited and able to attend the wedding, I forgave my body. It has not been forgiven yet. 

All my common sense tells me that when one is as deep into the myeloma journey as I am, I have to see these trips and experiences as a bonus. In February, I had two big fat bonuses. 

I’m paying for all of this now. On the Sunday I returned home, I got into bed, took my steroids and stayed there until the Wednesday. I then travelled back to my parents’ house and spent some more quality time in bed, feeling the burn.

Ignoring the puppy draped round my neck, I think this photograph sums up ‘the burn’ pretty well.

It is now almost two weeks later and I am still tired. I am always tired, but sometimes, just sometimes, I can pull a rabbit out of a hat and experience something different. 
Running throughout this whole period, in addition to my pill popping ways, I also completed my annual Oscar challenge. To quote an Oscar winning movie, I will ask myself when frustration kicks in, how do you like them apples? 

EJB x

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Last Christmas

The following was written some time ago, but unfortunately, I live in a world full of germs and I caught Influenza A and subsequently forgot that I had written this blog, let alone that I needed to post it. It seems a shame to waste my ramblings; so close your eyes (then open them again so you can read) and take yourself all the way back to December 2016:

  πŸŽ„ πŸŽ…πŸ» πŸŽ„ πŸŽ…πŸ» πŸŽ„ πŸŽ…πŸ» πŸŽ„ πŸŽ…πŸ» πŸŽ„ πŸŽ…πŸ»  πŸŽ„ 

You may think that Christmas was so last year, but as today is the 10th Day of Christmas, I think I can just about sneak a blog post about Christmas under the radar.  Plus, ordinarily I love Christmas, so it would be remiss of me after a year of blogging very little, to not recognise Christmas as it is a pivotal part of my annual calendar.

This year, things were different. I found it incredibly diffficult to get into the Christmas spirit. The Christmas spirit usually comes so easy to me. The drugs seemed to have sucked all the energy out of me, preventing me from participating in some of my favourite Christmas activities. Thus, going through December, I was not seeing combinations of red and gold and getting goosebumps, I wasn’t singing O Come All Ye Faithful in the shower. I felt nothing. I know what the main cause for my humbug was, and it opens one up to saying a crude but well timed joke about George Michael; was this, 2016, going to be my last Christmas? I’m not plucking this negativity from the air by the way, there’s a genuine (outside) chance that it was. With that seed planted, what Hope was there to have an innocent, Myeloma free Christmas? 

So, when it came to making my beloved Christmas cards, cards that I had designed and invested time and money into, and had been thinking about since September: I just couldn’t do it. For at least three days, I slept next to all of my craft paraphernalia convinced it would help me complete them. It’s a similar strategy I employed at university walking round with the biography of Menachem Begin for six weeks, hoping that it would go in via osmosis. It didn’t work then either. Comparing the feeling I had to university stress is apt. The enjoyment I was gained from this activity, had passed. All I felt was undue stress. 

I argued with myself for three weeks. You enjoy it, Emma! Pull your finger out, Emma ! Everybody is expecting them! You are a failure! That was one side, the other side just rolled over and fell asleep. It seems like such a mundane thing to get so upset over, but upset I was. Every year since I was diagnosed, I have made my own Christmas cards. Last year, I made and sent over 50. Was the fact I could not do them a sign that medically, I am detiorating or had the Grinch simply stolen my Christmas?   

I cannot answer those questions, but on top of not making and sending Christmas cards, I also failed to do any Christmas themed baking or make the additional decorations for my tree I had been planning for months. The weight of each of incomplete activity, was unfathomable. Is it really possible for me to have an enjoyable Christmas without all the planned activities I once deemed to be fun? 

I refused to give in. I sought any excuse for my humbug that did not involve Myeloma and the makings of a bad TV movie. It must have been somewhere. The search felt endless. Could my lack of festive feeling be due to my age?  That’s never been an issue before, so Veto. 

Due to financial restraints brought on by  not working and being on benefits , I was unable to buy many Christmas presents. Thinking about what gifts I can buy my loved ones and wrapping them up in a style to suit the recipients personality, has always been a Christmas highlight. But alas, that was no longer open to me. I found that I did not even have the energy to think about presents. 

What about work? I thought. My experience of working in an office is that during the month of December (and the back end of November) there would be at least one discussion a day about Christmas. Work drinks, family drinks, Christmas presents, wrapping; the talk was endless. Despite forcing myself to watch endless Christmas movies, perhaps my failure to socialise with colleagues, buoying each other’s festive spirits up day in day and day out was the cause of my sadness. 2016 also marked the first Christmas I had not been invited to a work Christmas Do since I was 14. 

Could that really be it? Had being forgotten by my work colleagues ruined Christmas? In short, no. Veto. I was invited to the Christmas party last year and chose not to go because I could not afford it, and I did not feel any the worse off. Like last year, my free time has to be used and planned carefully. I do not have seven days and seven nights to play with anymore.

It would also be wrong not to mention the level of pain I was in during December. I was in a lot of increasing pain, which on many a day, prevented me from moving. I don’t know how responsible it is, but my chronic pain was definitely guilty of ruining some of December. Upon return to my mother’s I discovered that I could no longer climb stairs without using both banisters. Yet another sign of deterioration perhaps?

Somewhere around the middle of December, coincidently, the day Rogue One was released, something strange happened. I uttered the words out loud that I was not going to be able to complete the cards, Mamma Jones told me it did not matter, and I began to relax. I really relaxed. My dear sweet Mamma lifted the weight off my shoulders at a most crucial time.  Socialising time. 

The 16 December launched four days of back to back socialising, which believe me, is now something very hard for me to do. I was suddenly busy and somewhere in that busy-ness, and laughs with my friends, I stopped dwelling. I stopped yearning for what once was and I began to enjoy myself. I smelt satsumas, mince pies and sang along to the Muppets. Finding my way out my slump gave me goosebumps.

And then, there was home. Home. Aware, at least I think they were aware, that I had been on a long Myeloma Downer, my family pulled out all the stops (at least I think that it was intentional). Christmas itself was marvellous. For the nine days I was home, Big Sister and her offspring were around for eight of them. I felt loved. The time went so quickly, that when it came to New Year’s Eve, I did not want to leave my family. For leaving meant that Christmas would be over and we might not know another one like it. 

Before I move on, anybody advising positivity, believe me when I say that I do not want my fears to become a self fulfilling prophecy. My fears are real and I cope with them by voicing them, much to the chagrin of my loved ones. I see things more clearly this way.

I did not intend to enjoy Christmas. I had been so worried that it was going to be my Last Christmas, that I was convinced I would find every tradition, every action, melancholy. Melancholy doesn’t cover it, I thought that every tradition, every action would rip my heart out through my throat and lay it bare for all the world to see. Thankfully, that did not happen. 

This photo clearly shows me unwillingly embarking on my journey back to London Town.

For me, our Jones Family Christmas worked so well because everybody, well all eight of us, was home. At no point was I stuck in the middle of nowhere with nothing to do. Between Mamma Jones, Big Sister and my neices, I had plenty to do. We did things together as a family and had family fun; I wanted to bottle the feeling up and savour it. 

I do wonder, with the benefit of a few days of hindsight, if it is possible to have a Christmas without the feeling that it will be my Last. Should I have just saved this blog for next Christmas? It’s the unknown. Everything from here is unknown.  I do know that things are changing, I can feel it in my aching bones. I was aware as of the 22 December that my treatment is going to change at some point in the near future, meaning my current treatment is failing. We are running out of options. Another daily thought that added weight to this theory of doom. 

I spent my New Year’s Eve with some friends, doing things that adults do like watching Jools Holland, eating nibbles off paper plates and playing board games. Somehow, I managed to stay out until 4am. I don’t think I did that for all of 2016. To fast forward, I did not have a hangover on New Year’s Day. A success by no stretch of the imagination. 

For the evening in question, I had managed to surround myself with good people and there were a few times during the evening that I could feel that hand approaching my heart again, ready to detach it from my body. I really am full of emotions these days. I don’t want to repeat earlier paragraphs, but essentially high from my visit home, now surrounded by friends I love, I wished that this was not my last New Year’s Eve. 

Despite being asked the question, I did not make any resolutions for 2017. I do not see the point, not for me anyway. Every time I was asked about resolutions or plans for 2017, my answer was the same. I do not want to make noticeable  changes. I want to keep on living. I want to be able to do what I am doing, maintain my freedom.  I want to enjoy my friends and my family. Most of all, I want to be able to make the most of my good days and get through the bad. 

Perhaps these are resolutions after all. 

And this is where the writing stopped and the flu took over. It took over for a whole fortnight, marking a great start to 2017. I know what caused the flu (New Year’s Eve) and who the culprit was (Nameless). I still would not trade NYE’s, despite the vomit and general foulness of the flu. I was ‘living’, right?

EJB x

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Bon Anniversaire

Today marks three years since Myeloma officially came into my life. It’s three years since that junior doctor cried as she sat at the foot of my bed whilst she broke the bad news to my family and me. Is it an anniversary worth celebrating? No. It is however a significant milestone in my life and one which marked for better and mostly worse, a permanent change in the life of Miss Emma Jane Jones. Put it another way, the 17 August 2012 was life changing. And it wasn’t only life changing for me.

Since that date, I have been given a whole set of new dates to remember, celebrate and dwell. My first transplant on the 17 July 2013 for example, but that failed, so it was not quite the rebirth I advocated at the time. Then there was my second auto on 1 April 2015 and then my Allo on 23 July 2015. Only time will tell if the latter dates are ones worthy of celebration or just dates of mild significance. Mind you, the date my DNA changed will always be fairly significant won’t it?

For me though, this anniversary is the Big One. It’s the one that started everything off and although I wasn’t given the formal diagnosis until three days later, the 17 August will always be the day I got myeloma. The day I got myeloma. A ridiculous notion really, because my vertebrae did not fracture on that date, and the paraprotein did not suddenly appear in my blood on the 17 August three years ago. It is the date I knew why these things were changing in my body. It is much like my birthday, except with far more adolescent longing. On this date, I can feel melancholy and I can feel slightly sorry for myself than usual. I can, if that way inclined, try and recall the best and the worst of my three years, the highs and lows of each of 1095 days, I have fought through. And it is a fight, people may be trying to soften the vocabulary, but for me, I see this as a fight, a really, really big one.

Of course, you can see and feel the date differently, which I occasionally do. For as sad as my diagnosis was and as much as I do not want to have myeloma, the 17 August is also the anniversary of me growing up. My Myeloma has forced me to do many things I have not wished to do and experience,  but it also forced me to become an adult. Not the adult I once envisaged with a mortgage, children and a shed; the sort I am jealous of now. I am an adult who is forced to sponge of the State and her parents, but I became an adult nevertheless. I look at my contemporaries and sometimes I think to myself, ‘how would you have managed it?’ It’s a question without an answer, and it is a question I would not wish upon anybody ever having to find the answer to. I do not like myself for thinking it, but even when I think about that question in relation to me, I question how I have managed it all, and I am proud of myself. Even at the moment, when I seem to question daily my strength to continue with my allo treatment, I am proud of myself for coping. I think us myeloma sufferers deserve far more kudos for merely coping. I bet you any amount of money, because I do not have any money to make any sort of meaningful bet, that three years ago, I would have thrown anybody out of my cubicle if they dared to say that the 17 August would be a date that I would eventually be proud of. 

Even though my pride only accounts for some of my feeling towards this day. My diagnosis was the making of me. 

It was indeed a Big Day. 

I could do what I have done in previous years and list all the treatment I have endured in such a short amount of time. I could go through the physical side effects I have experienced many times over and have been forced to become accustomed to. I could even talk about how long I statistically have left in this world,  but I will not be doing any of that today.  This year feels different to me. Maybe it is because I am no longer at UCH and things seem temporary at St Bart’s. Though, really My Myeloma feels more than just the facts and the figures. Since my last anniversary, I feel like so much has changed; I do not know if it is a tangible change or just a non-drug related feeling in my gut.

Perhaps, prior to this last year, when I embarked on a nine month treatment programme followed by two SCT, I believed nothing had really permanently changed. I mean, I knew things had changed, but there was a part of me that still believed that my life could at some point at an unknown time and date, just slot back until place. I know that will not happen now. My 13 months of near constant treatment shown me that.

Until this last year, I also believed that I had a well established Support Network in place. I believed that all the perceived letting down I had experienced in that first year, was the only letting down I was going to experience in My Myeloma journey. My relapse last June corrected that misunderstanding. I feel far more let down post relapse than during any other time during my illness. Make a leaflet about that Myeloma UK, some people, those without myeloma, just cannot handle the fact that myeloma is a cancer that is chronic. That it goes on forever.

It is a strange thing to say, when I feel so well supported and loved now, but I have had to grieve the fact that some people got bored of my cancer and thus they got bored of me. It felt like they had tasted and enjoyed the 11 months of freedom remission had given me, and thought that taking it all on again with another relapse was too difficult a task to take. My stock went down. There were some people who made promises of support and friendship, not always actual promises you understand, but their presence alone throughout the early days of my illness, made me naΓ―ve enough to believe there was  something special and enduring in place. A promise of friendship. All I would say of this to anybody else in the same position as me, is, be warned of the glory seeker. When I am stuck in no man’s land, where there is no guaranteed end in sight, and the cancer keeps coming back along with my unpredictable fatigue, and those around me are moving on because they can, people and their promises can disappear. I have seen many of those promises, accompanied by those friendships end up on the proverbial scrap heap. 

It’s made for a difficult year and one where I have had to learn to stand on my own two feet. Fortunately, there is a flip side to this and if my relapse had taught me anything, it was who I could trust to stand side by side with me, as my treatment and their lives continue to develop. It does not always have to be either or, even though I am still prone to bouts of paranoia on this subject. Let’s not kid ourselves, I’m only physically well rounded. 

My relapse showed me that early on in my treatment, I made mistakes. I criticised my friends’ behaviour, in some cases I did so publicly and I regret that now. They were struggling like I was and they showed their struggle differently to how how presented mine. In the last few months, I have seen so much evidence of the support I have during my transplants, that I feel confident that even on my lowest days, I’ll have at least one person willing to pull me through the darkness. We just need to work on how I let people know. 

As it currently all stands, I know that My Support Network is well founded and passionate. It is mine, it is invaluable and I know that it is built on trust, even though I do not get to see its members as much as I would like to and I am pretty certain that is a feeling that works both ways. Rather strangely, or should that be tellingly, My Support Network is made up of people I have known for years either because they are related to me (obviously) or because they have had the good fortune of being my friend long before I knew what myeloma was. It has taken a while and the occasional misunderstanding, but I know who will be there when I need them. Some people will need to be asked for help and others won’t, but that is just the way things have always been and thus, it is the way things should be. I just wish there was more I could personally do to make my friendships equal again. Homemade cards only get me so far. 

Anyway, on the subject of my Support Network, I am making myself blush and as you are not all on anti sickness pills like me, I will put an end to the subject soon, I promise.  I could have just said what I am about to say five paragraphs ago;  My Support Network is irreplaceable. It may be irreplaceable, but crucially, my personal strength and journey through My Myeloma should not be defined and determined by it, and post relapse, when the droppings happened liked flies, I had to accept this the hard way and quickly.

My ability to cope with myeloma, is a much broader achievement than my Support Network. I personally, will always feel isolated by my illness and I have spent three years learning how to cope with this. I do not have all the answers, but I have more than I did last year, so who knows what I will be saying next year? And the year after that? And the year after that? 

Last night, as I was trying to drift off to sleep, I began to worry that with three years of near-constant treatment, there was a possibility  that soon, I might not have the strength to continue fighting should my current treatment fail. My current treatment, which I am nearly halfway though, is not exactly a walk in the park and trust me when I say, I have many a down day. I am fully aware that I will have more down days over the next x days. I will fail to get out of bed a few more times, find myself physically unrecognisable and cry over missing events with my  friends. I worried so much about my occasional thoughts of giving up, that I envisaged quite a different blog to the one you are currently reading. 

I haven’t only experienced treatment, relapse and drugs in my third year of myeloma. In the last year, somebody dear to me lost his fight against myeloma. He became dearer to me, selfishly, with my own diagnosis three years ago. He was somebody who I never saw being remotely negative about the bastard that is myeloma apart from rebranding Velcade, “Cillit Bang”.  I fear negativity is my default position the minute the going gets remotely tough. His eldest daughter also gave me an invaluable crash course in myeloma and continues to offer me considerable patience. Her Dad did not have a sibling donor and thus could not have an Allo SCT, instead  he had two auto SCTs and several other treatments such is the norm for current myeloma treatment on the NHS. He was given velcade and among many of the things, he suffered from steroid insomnia. He did not know it, but he was My Myeloma rock, and the only other person with myeloma I needed to know. My current treatment is the first treatment I have had that he did not have in some incarnation or another. I remind myself that I  feel poorly because I am lucky enough to have a sibling donor, and last week when I couldn’t get out of bed, I thought about him and his family, (and not because I had just watched The Man With The Golden Gun remembering a holiday we had) and I got out of bed. That’s all I really want to say about that. 

Three years after my diagnosis, in the middle of a transplant where I had to sign to say I was aware of all the risks that could happen during it, I am ever aware of my life and the chance of my death. I am also ever aware of the chance of my death being further away than the statistics that I will not talk about, and current literature would suggest. 

It’s been three years of changing and developing treatments and a changing and developing me. I don’t know how to end my acknowledgement of my anniversary, so I am just going to say goodbye and thank you for reading my blogs. I promise they will continue.

EJB x 

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Β The Notice Board

Way back in 2013, I spent 11 days of my life in a room of great bleakness. It is difficult to conjure up the mental differences between slight and great bleakness, but  for me it was a room that encompasses everything that was bad with this word. If only it were the interior design of that room that was a problem. The centrepiece, if such a room could be deemed to have a centrepiece that was not its bed on wheels, was a grey notice board with three signs to the right hand side of the board. The biggest sign told me how to wash my hands properly (but I think I moved it there) , the second poster told me if and why I would be eligible for the Patient Transport Service and finally, there was a leaflet, that if you looked really hard at, you could see the 12pt font printed list of all the additional fatty foods I could order from from the canteen due to my not eating right and the neutropenia. I still cannot get over the fact that eating badly is considered to be better for you than a piece of fruit in any situation, but there it is. The PTS sign had some late 90s clipart on in and somebody had definitely used the ‘Tools’ section on MS Word on all the documents.  I hated that notice board. I have also realised that I still hate that notice board. 

The closer I got to April’s transplant, the most frantic I become about ensuring that I would never have to look at that grey notice board again or it’s posters. One of those things could not be achieved because all hospitals all over the land, have posters telling visitors how to wash their hands, and I currently have my sight and can pee, so put two and two together. Developing a board that would be nice to look at became almost integral to my planning. I mentioned in to friends and the importance of of was mentioned in my counselling sessions.

All in all, I think I visited four art gallery shops, the BFI shop, two Boot’s Pharmacists for printing purposes and Amazon. I had mini pegs, string two different styles of pins and just under 15 postcards to accompany my ten or so photographs. I was going to be the best notice board that had ever been nailed to a wall. 

And then, realistically being Β£20 lighter, it turned out that I did not need it during Transplant Number 1. I am not kidding when I say that I was slightly disappointed by this. I was disappointed that I was not become sick enough to to be admitted to hospital to see my notice board come to fruition. 

Unlike the majority of you folks out there, I realised that I would very soon be given the opportunity that did not involve committing a crime or other institutionalisation, to be in a room with a notice board. I hoped and I waited and I packed my ‘art’ with wanting. Then last Wednesay happened, I was admitted. With breath that was baited, I was taken to Room 10. I knew the word ‘room’ meant I would be in my own room, but in the few short pushes in the wheelchair I closed my eyes and touched EMan’s paw. It worked, and  because when the door opened, I saw not a notice board but a white board. I’m an artist of many a media, and just as soon as I received confirmation from three different Medically Trained People that the board was not there for medicinal reasons, it was go go. I was ready for my Art.  Given the change in background, Mamma Jones had to go out and buy scissors and tape, and given the passing of time, I misplaced a few photographs and postcards. 

In the end, not all of my support network was represented, and I had to explain to far too many people that some of the photos were not of my own (presumably failed) wedding, but it worked. I had directed a little something of my own to make what was a 7 night stay in hospital, that very bit not bearable.

  

And yes, it had fairy lights too.

And double yes, it’s back to being a white board.

EJB x

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Rallying

Yesterday marked the end of five days of pre transplant conditioning. That would be, five whole days of travelling to and from St Bart’s for chemotherapy. Since the fist clenching, swear word swallowing experience of Day One’ (Day-6), I have endeavoured to be on my best behaviour when on the ward, experiencing the medical equivalent of seeing Wagner’s longest work without subtitles with an innate hatred of opera. 

I concluded that if I cannot always  service with a smile, I should be the one delivering said smile. It is something that is much easily willed than done, especially as the chemotherapy is having a negative, cumulative impact on every aspect of my body. My brain, my muscles, my bowel and my bladder feels like they have been assaulted by a BB gun and multiple sacks of potatoes. Thus, finding the energy to smile, let alone speak, does not come as easily to me as it usually, all so naturally does.

I have been attempting to rally myself into a state of positivity, but for me, this last five days at least, it is not something I have been able to do all on my lonesome. I have needed assistance. Poor Mamma Jones has been on the other end of the phone wishing she was in London. I even admitted to my friends that I was in need of assistance. Assistance being in the form company to make the hours in the clinic more bearable. Assistance to remind me that this is only a temporary measure, that won’t go on forever. Special kudos has to go out to Housemate who fought through what I can only imagine was a horrific hangover on Saturday to be at the hospital for 9am, returning home at 5pm. Yesterday, he even did my dishes, which is unheard of. 

In all honesty, this cannot be done alone. Yesterday, I forgot to brush my teeth, which I am sure was a pleasure for the Medically Trained People who had to get remotely close to my face. Even with a support network, the treatment is isolating.  If I feel like this now, who the heck knows how I will feel in a few months time?

In terms of the immediate side effects,   the hiccups have been plaguing me since yesterday, and when one looks like this post chemo, imagine what I look like mid multiple jerk:

 
Today, I have a ‘day off’, but this still involves heading into the hospital for blood tests. Big Sister also arrives in the Big Smoke for her part of the process today, so it seems only fair that I meet her to express some of the inexpressable gratifitude. 

Prior to last Thursday, I was told that I would find the conditioning relatively easy in comparison to my previous treatments. I wouldn’t go out and out and call this a white lie, I just think it’s difficult to be comparative to my past experiences when my current experience is so foul.  I might have fouled myself twice in 2013, but that is no consolation when I cannot take my morning medication without vomiting or distinguish whether ‘consolation’ is the correct word to use here over ‘consolidation’. 

We all know how much I love to talk about my toilet issues, so imagine the complex situation I found myself in on Monday night, four days without passing a number 2 whilst experiencing a cystitis-like pain from the cyclophosphamide. Every effort to unleash the stool, angered the other thing. It was a pain that could only be muted by taking two diazepam to permit a long sleep. It was a temporary reprieve, for it was still an issue present upon waking, but, hey, at least I got some sleep. Last night on the other hand, my sleep was interrupted five times to pass water because of the cyclophosphamide. 

The last five days have been relentless. With an auto, it’s one day of treatment than the transplant. The horrible side effects hit you later. I will probably be thankful when what experienced in 2013 doesn’t hit me, but right now, I just really, really want a week in my bed to recover. I know I am a good few weeks away from this luxury. 

So, in the meantime, I just have to rally. Rally and remember the key words that ‘This Soon Time Pass’.

  
EJB x

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Something Borrowed

I am often being told that My Myeloma is not all my own. It would be correct to say that my illness is not all about me, the people around me have suffered effects of the illness just as I have; they’ve metaphorically and actually held my hand, they have lost a drinking mate, they put up with me and fained interest in me describing in minute detail what I have cooked on any given day, they have dealt with my mood swings and there are many, many more things that are too long to list here. 

Very soon (with my fingers crossed), somebody is going to be physically affected by My Myeloma. I will be borrowing something quite exceptional from my Big Sister. It’s beyond exceptional. It’s a minor miracle.  Just as this will be a new experience for me and a potential lifeline, it is a brand new experience for her. I’m not even sure if the word ‘experience’ encompasses the enormity of what she is about to do. I really isn’t just about me anymore…

Two weeks ago, Big Sister travelled to London for her pre transplant tests. From this, among other things, we learned that it is not only me who has to wait around a hospital.
And so, without further waffle, for one time only, I give you Big Sister:

I had known for 33 months that I was a match for my sister and that I carried round her magic medicine and possible cure. Just a few days after Emma’s diagnosis, my tissue was tested to see if I was a match. There was only a 25% chance that I would be, so we were all thrilled when it was confirmed I was a 10/10 match. I can still remember everything about the call from the hospital telling me this, and my phone call to Emma to tell her.

It’s been quite a responsibility carrying the stem cells around, if I had had my way they would have been taken as soon as we knew I was a match. I even carry around an ICE card in the event of an accident which states I am a living donor and they meant let me die until my stem cells have been harvested.

A few months ago, we were told I would need a medical before I donated. After months of asking, my medical for stem cell donation was arranged for the 11 June. I was anxious to say the least. What if, after all this time, Emma’s own stem cell transplants and our hopes, I couldn’t donate?
I caught the 7:21 train to London, sat in my reserved seat and tried to revise for my upcoming exams. Instead, all I could do was listen to the moron diagonally opposite me, try desperately hard to make conversation with the barrister next to him. Among the many conversation starters he came up with was ‘we all have cancer you know?’ I sat there wondering if I should say anything about his rather random and insensitive comment; in the end I figured my thoughts would be wasted as he was a proper know all. 
I hopped out the train and grabbed a taxi to St Barts. I was there a few minutes before my appointment. I was weighed and measured and then sent to see a consultant. The consultant was nice and cheery, he told me a load of things I already knew and completed a questionnaire about my health. I signed a consent form, the same one I give women at the hospital I am training at, before they have a caesarean, except this time ‘donate stem cells’ was written in the blank space.
Next, I went to meet my CNS, my very own CNS, how about that? She talked to me about dates, and we agreed that the harvest would start on the 22 July. I assumed this meant I had passed the medical, although no one said. My CNS then sent me for an ECG, and some blood tests.
I wandered round the huge hospital to where I was told I would get my ECG, only to be told the department had recently moved and I now needed to be at the other end of the hospital….so off I went. I was called in immediately, it took about 5 minutes to stick on all the sensor thingies and then just a minute to do the trace. I was handed the trace and told to take it back to the CNS. I was a bit reluctant to hand the ECG trace over before I knew it was ok, so I quickly Googled what a good trace looked like. Mine was similar, what a relief, so I handed it over.
Next it was time to take ‘some’ blood samples. Off I went, back to the main building and up to the 6th floor. I went and sat in a bay where other people were having chemo. A nurse came and started taking out the empty sample bottles. Now I am not going to lie, I hate needles, I always have and always will. Trying desperately hard not to embarrass myself in front of these poorly people that have to under go needles frequently, I let her take my blood…..all 16 bottles.

  
Finally, I was sent to the pharmacy to get my G-CSF injections. I waited over an hour, but they never appeared. It turns out that the prescription was wrong. As a result, I couldn’t meet Emma for lunch and Emma will now need to collect my injections for me at some point.

A week or so later, I had a text from my CNS to say all my blood tests were ok. The next day, I received a letter in the post from St Barts. My heart pounded a bit as I opened it, luckily it was a confirmation to my GP that I was suitable to donate, requesting they do check up on me following the harvest.

  
So after all that, and after 33 months, on the 18 July, I will start to inject myself with G-CSF, the growth hormone to make more stem cells. I’m not entirely sure how I will do this, but I will cross that bridge at the time. On the 21 July, I will go to St Barts for my pre-op tests. On the 22 July, I will have my stem cells harvested. They will be cleaned up and given straight to Emma. 
It all sounds quite simple. If simple means needles, stem cells and giving your little sister a lifeline. 

Can it really, finally, be happening?

EJB x




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Subject: Me, Me, Me

The following is an email I sent to some of the Support Network in preparation for today and beyond. In some of this, I will repeat things that I have written previously, but in my current, highly rational state, I think this is a good indication of where I am, and what I need to come. Why send a private email you ask? Well, firstly it saves energy, and secondly, I hope to dispel an ideas that my medical plan is the same as having a wort removed… Mind you, until you have pooped your pants and hallucinated green goblins bursting out your stomach because you are in so much pain, it’s all relative isn’t it? 

Please note, some of the names have been removed because this really is, all about me.

From: Emma Jane Bones

To: Friends

Sent: In the early hours of 29 March 2015

Dear All,

Hello. As I have had the last minute go ahead from the powers that be, I thought it was time for me to send an email outlining just what the hell is going to happen. 

Fear not dear friends, it is not an emotional email, just one layered with practical points about how my year is going to roll from now on. If some of that sounds emotional or distressing, it was not my intention. BLANK, The Counsellor suggested me levelling expectations. I think this is levelling expectations.

I know that this may seem self indulgent, but the transplant clock is a ticking. Plus, although it will not be emotional for you, it is an emotional subject for me, so it is easier for me to write it down rather than to say it. Secondly, I hope it’ll save me from telling people the same thing over and over again, forgetting who I have said it to, and thus bore you into silence.

Before I get going, I would like to thank those of you who have organised and/or participated in recent activities. To everybody else who I have not been able to see, I thank you for still continuing to care. It’s all very much appreciated. More generally, I had hoped I would have been freer from this for longer, but that was not the plan, so I thank you for still being around.

I am going to try to keep this brief, but who am I kidding, I can never be that brief. 

The Plan

1 April
I will go to UCH on Wednesday morning, when all being well, I will be given the high dose chemo. I will initially be staying in ambulatory care, also known as the hotel, with my mother. 

Thursday is known as ‘Day 0’ in the biz and this is the day I have the transplant. 

3 April onwards
I will be in Ambi Care until the poop starts or my temperature hits 38, or I show any other type of illness. There is no real way of knowing how long this will take, last time I was out for 5 days, but that means nothing.

Once I am sick, I will move into the tower on the 13th or 16th floor.  They say expect to be in for 3-4 weeks, but last time I was in for 10 days… I know which option I would prefer. 

My hair will go FYI. My feelings towards this are surprising. I did not anticipate this much dread, but the dread is there. I’ll be shaving it off after I have had the chemotherapy, maybe on Friday. If anybody fancies doing this for me, let me know? I have George’s clippers.

On Discharge
Once I am well enough to go home, I will be heading back to BLANK until I am well enough to reasonably look after myself. I say ‘look after myself’, what I actually mean is able to return to the flat and only rely on BLANK for a few things instead of everything.

During the time between transplants, I doubt I will be able to do that much. Afternoon trips to the Picturehouse might be doable. Definitely/maybe no alcohol. As with everything else, we will just have to see.

For those of you with birthdays during this time, I will endeavour to attend, but do not hold it against me if I do not. 

June/July
I will go to St Bart’s for the second transplant. Initially I will be an outpatient, there is a chance I will remain one for the whole procedure, the odds they gave me for this are 50/50. 

Don’t let this outpatient nonsense fool you. Whilst the risk of a particular negative result is no longer 40%, it is still high. Those figures are not based on the first few weeks after the cells are introduced, it is based on the months (and I mean months) after and whether my body decides to completely reject my sister’s cells. If this happens, it happens, but fingers crossed it will not. Best to say that now, so you have realistic expectations. It may not be an operation, but it’s a serious thing. 

I have been told that the best case scenario post number 2 will be rashes and gut problems, with a side of fatigue. I’m hoping to go back to being a size 16. Anecdotally, the fatigue is something I have not yet experienced. I am afraid of this the most. I am afraid of only having the energy to lie in bed for months on end and become bitter. I do not want to become bitter.

I’ll hammer this point home, the recovery is going to be long. Real long.  The guidance says no international travel for two years, but I think this must be wrong. 

Hospital Visits for Transplant 1

Whilst I am in the hotel, I will be accompanied by my mum or sister. On Wednesday, I imagine I’ll be too tired when it is all done and I’ll just want my bed, so no visitors that day unless you want to watch me suck ice cubes during the day. 

Thereafter, I will be able to receive and I will need visitors.

As I’ll need my mother a great deal throughout the year, I have said she does not need to be around too much whilst I am in hospital. This will mean that I will need visitors, because being stuck in a room for 10 days (or more) is extremely isolating. 

Here is the problem, I may well not have the brain capacity to schedule your visits. At the start, I’ll be better at it, but when the pooing and vomiting starts, I’ll probably find texting back stressful. I’m not sure how to resolve this issue, other than just ask you to come and hope I’ll be free. Or you can organise it amongst yourselves. Not practical I know, but I’m just anticipating the worst case scenario.

There are no visiting hours, although the mornings are when the doctors do their rounds and when the cleaners come. You probably do not want to see them.

It sounds obvious, but if you feel unwell, do not come. I will have no immune system. Don’t buy me anything.

In between visits, feel free to keep in contact, I’ll be tired and might not always reply right away, but text messages are always fun.

You

After my release, I will be suffering from fatigue. It’s a word you will get bored of. The fatigue, as I said earlier, will get worse after the second transplant. I am not exaggerating when I say that getting over the last transplant’s fatigue was the hardest thing I have ever done. It makes it quite difficult to trust my emotions.


As such, it would be prudent for me to say that there will be times when I become depressed. I hope not many, but it will happen and that will make me question pretty everything and everyone. In turn, this may make me appear like an irrational and mean bitch. All I can say to this is please bear with me, and try not to give up on me. I have an aromatherapy stick this time for relaxation, and you never know, it might just be what I need to keep it all together. If it is not, I will  apologise to you in advance.

Not being able to get out of bed, for long periods of time, it is easy to feel forgotten and lonely. So, I’ll need one sided friendships for a while. Colin will need a break sometimes too and I may need people to cook for me and other things. All this will require me learning to ask for help, or you could just be forceful. That will be tough on you, because I will become quite dull.

My life will probably be quite myeloma obsessed. Let me reassure you now, this will not be because I like to be the centre of attention or talk about myself. I am always more than happy and willing to talk about anything else. You just have to start that anything, for, I will not know of anything else unless you want me to tell you what is happening on my Facebook feed.

Realistically, I will not be as well as I am now, until the new year. I might be pleasantly surprised, but the odds for that, are not in my favour.

Other

Last time I had a transplant, I sent text updates for major transplant developments. If you wish to receive these again, do let me know.

So, all that is left to say is thank you. I cannot emphasise this enough, but you are all appreciated. I know I have upset people in the past for not showing or saying this enough, but, most the time I think I have. I’m quite forgetful don’t you know.

Emma 

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Veet

As part of a harebrained scheme to enjoy my final ‘healthy’ weeks before the transplant plans, I opted to take my steroid dose in one go, on Monday 23 February and ending four days later. That was four whole days of a lot of dexamethasone. Something I have done many a times before, but I soon discovered that it was different from the befores. My tried and tested theory was for me to get the big crash out of the way, so I did not need to worry about the pesky little mini crashes that I have become accomstomed to since Velcade was reintroduced to my life in December, which in turn would allow me to enjoy myself. I knew it would take me down, and I had planned to just let it, and silently will it to disappear as quickly as possibly. Vite, vite. 

Despite it being a tried and tested formula, I failed to fully realise what four days of steroids would do to me after eight months of non-stop chemotherapy. The result? Persistent ugliness. And I mean ugly. I mean five days of my bed, sweating, lots of carbohydrates, bad breath and swollen glands. Last Tuesday was the sixth day, of the crash and I congratulated myself for getting dressed with my trusty Rubywoo on my lips, but I after a two hour trip to the hospital for a dose of Cilit Bang, my energy was spent and it was back to my sofa for some blanket time. We’re it not for the hospital and the fact that I did not want the cleaner to think I was a slothenly sloth, I would have happily gone for a sixth day of flat bound cosiness. 

All reason told me that the crash was going to end, but it took me down to such an extent that I could not see how it was possibly going to end. When I started to write this blog a week ago, I wrote that “with the benefit of hindsight, I probably would not have decided to take this vile poison the way I did, because the take down was beyond something I imagined and could take.”

One week later, with the benefit of hindsight, I can say that despite it not being quick, I did absolutely the right thing. I find it interesting that last week, I documented my frustration. Now, I do not recall feeling that fed up with it all. I can almost look upon it fondly, like something made to deliver self indulgent anecdotes to friends. 

Housemate, do you remember the time I did not leave the flat for four days and did nothing but lie on the sofa watching mediocre films and eating crisps? My, that was a hoot wasn’t it?”

See? It’s a story with legs.

The four days I stayed in my flat, I was somewhat impressed with myself that I managed to shower everyday. I did not get dressed in the sense that I was wearing clothes I would be happy for people to see me in public, but I did put on the trusty trousers with an elasticated waist and my, did that feel good. When I was not looking at my television or the inside of my eyelids, my view was this (well, in colour):

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I can say with complete certainty that one creature appreciated my crash.

One of downsides of not having the energy to leave the house, is grooming. Or the lack there of. As a long time steroid abuser, I suffer from an unfortunate side effect in which my face becomes inexplicably prickly. Prickles that become more noticeable when applying makeup is forgone because doing so would require an hour nap afterwards. By the Sunday, my third full day in bed, the black prickles became too, too much for my slow brain to take and Housemate was selfless in his kindness. He walked for three whole minutes to Boots and came home with a packet of Veet Facial Wax Strips, which he treated me to, so I could de-fuzz my face. Do you know what that gave me beyond the obvious removal? Another anecdote.

Mamma Jones, Housemate went to Boots today so I could remove my beard.”

See? 

As for now, six days after the crash ended, I have some energy. I’ve been able to socialise and process some thoughts beyond those of self pity and thoughts of no escape. For now at least. I am well aware that my six day crash is just a precursor for what is to come. If I wanted that to go away quickly, I cannot imagine what I am going to feel like post transplants. My despair last Tuesday scares me, because I have more than six bad days ahead of me. On the otherhand, my feelings post crash is a buoy. I mean, just think of the possible anecdotes…. And Bruce snuggles.

EJB x

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My Little Secret

As I emerge from yet another broken night’s sleep, I think it is high time I revealed a little secret in the hope that I can have a full night’s sleep tonight…

Dum. Dum. Dum.

In no way, whatsoever, am I coping with my transplant plans. You can exhale now. I do not feel ‘okay’, which if you did not know is my default, do not alarm people adjective for my health and my feelings. I find anything below the Okay Line, all rather embarrassing and not very English. I do not think I can hold my stiff upper lip anymore, and in admitting that, I suspect I am letting some people down.

I might me as big as one, but I am currently, not as strong as an ox.

If you are fortunate enough to be the handful of people I have felt well enough to talk to over the last week, I may have mentioned the subject and smiled. My voice may have even broken as I succeeded to hold back the weight of conflicting emotion. You may have left the conversation thinking that some of my fears had been listened to and that as a consequence I felt a better. I may have felt a little better, but then we have only really scraped surface. I do not know how to present the truth to people, to my Network.

The truth is, at this moment in time, as I am due to spend the next x weeks preparing for y months of illness and the unknown, all I can think is ‘can I do this?’ Then, when I am done considering that and everything than encompasses, I ask myself ‘is it going to be worth it?’ If I have allowed the brain to truly spiral into self pity, the latter question is accompanied by the sub question, ‘what are you even going to be left with?’

Reading my questions, I would like to think that your answers would be ‘yes, yes and a lot’. I keep telling myself that these should be my answers. There is something else in my head however, on repeat, with a persistent beat, saying ‘this is all too much, Emma‘. Too, too much.

On a practical level, I can discuss the x and y. By that, I can talk to somebody about how I have purchased new pyjamas, when I am going to shave my head, my concerns about where my PICC line is going to be in relation to the toilet door in my hospital rooms and whether it is possible to magically speed up my iPad so I can have meaningful entertainment in the hospitals. That’s the limit though, because everything else is a black hole of uncertainties of terrifying gargantuan proportions.*

In a much needed counselling session last week, in answer to my first question, I almost satisfied myself with the answer, ‘I’m just going to have to pull something really big out of my arse’. Even in the most emotional of circumstances, I still manage to find a way with words. My reasoning was that I have managed to hold myself together for over two years of near constant treatment, by flying, very slowly, by the seat of my pants.

My ability to create magic from my bottom, I believe will be greatly aided if I can use my x weeks productively, to see my Support Network, do things that I will not be able to enjoy for the rest of 2015 and complete my annual Oscar’s Challenge.

There is a problem with this plan in addition to my financial constraints, and it is a problem that is adding to my current woes. The problem is called fatigue. After 28 weeks of ongoing treatment, my body is coping less well with the thing they call energy. Not only that, but my new treatment regime, which involves the return of Cilit Bang and coordinated weekly doses of steroids, means that I have even less energy to do the things I would like to do. I have become most flaky in my social planning, for, I am finding there is just a lot of things I cannot do. On Saturday for example, I was out of my flat for a total of 5 hours, which included lunch, the cinema and a trip around Dalston. At the end of that, the only place I was going was to my bed to feel sorry for myself.

My head does not need the additional hurdle of fatigue at this stage. Last night, as I sat on my bed for 20 minutes working up the energy to put on my pyjamas, brush my teeth and give myself my G-CSF injection, I thought that the year of fatigue had already started. I am already struggling and it will go down before it goes up. It is an extremely scary thought.

Scarier still is what is to come when I head into my transplants. As I am one to blow my own trumpet, last week I summed it up well when I said that the best case scenario is that I am incredibly ill for a year. I might have even put that in my last blog, I cannot remember, in which case I said it a fortnight ago. I am going to stop, lie and watch whilst everybody around me continues to live. I obviously want them all to live, but that does make me feel behind. Immature. I try not to think about how much of my life has been put on pause with my treatment, but I would be naive to not realise how magnified I am going to find this reality when I am bed bound for such a long period of time.

Fingers crossed I will emerge well from my procedures, but that will come at a cost. I will have no money, I probably will not have a job and I will still be single and not so ready to mingle. I know myself well enough to realise at some (many) point(s) over the year I’ll be jealous and angry that others will be experiencing what I wanted for myself. I do not know how I will deal with this and I that is a concern. I am scared of driving people away. Mamma Jones recently described me during my first transplant as a ‘brat’. That was a revelation because I thought I was an angel.

When I ponder whether it’ll all be worth it in the end, my fear is that My Myeloma would have left me a shell of a human being with little relation to who I was up to 17 August 2012. I do not know what I will have to offer. This is a shocker, but myeloma has most certainly dented my self esteem. Even now, I am haunted by the words a friend said to me post my first transplant in October 2013. ‘Everybody is bored of your myeloma. You need to understand they need a break from it and thus you’.

Imagine that, huh? I know for a fact I am not going to be an easy person as things get going (seeing quote from Mamma Jones), and I fear that those kind words will become truer and truer as the year progresses. How far with loyalty get me? I have already seen some of this specific concern reflected in my relapse. I cannot do many a thing these days and thus less people feature in my life as a consequence of that. When I am high as a kite on morphine or after spending a third day without speaking to anybody but my mum, imagine how those thoughts will play. Actually, you do not have to imagine, I have imagined it for you and I am trying my hardest to find a way for me to not let it happen.

Of course, I have my fears about the worst case scenario too. I am still superstitious, trying to be brave and limit what can be perceived as complaint, so you’ll just have to read between the lines on what I do not want to happen.

I was surprised earlier in the week that somebody else was surprised when I told them that I have recently become reacquainted with the uncontrollable tears. They asked me why I was upset… I really hope the cat is out of the bag now.

And quiver.

Now, if people can make me feel loved without making me feel awkward or like you are taking pity on me, it would be much appreciated. Don’t worry, I can talk about things that are not about myeloma, in case you were on the cusp of getting bored. I think.

EJB x

* In case you were wondering, I am working on increasing my limits. I’m searching for some metaphorical tools. Do you know where I can find them?

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