Tag Archives: bone lesions

The Know It All

When it came to getting my radiotherapy, I was very much in the been there, done that, got the t-shirt, camp. If there is such a camp when it comes to radiotherapy. I bet there are radiotherapy clubs, but this is just me thinking out loud. I do not want to join a radiotherapy club. Prior to my sessions last week, I had had radiotherapy twice before. Whilst my previous experiences were not without their side effects, if you had spoken to me the week before last, you would have heard me say with great confidence “of all the cancer treatments I have had, radiotherapy is by far the easiest one.” One of my dear friends offered to put her child into nursery to accompany me on my first session, another dear friend offered to take a day off work; both offers were immediately rejected as wholly unnecessary and seen as (a much appreciated) overreaction. 

I thought radiotherapy was easy. At least the way in which I have experienced radiotherapy was easy; in the form of a short five day course or as a one off session. I am not naive or conceited enough to think that the people who require weeks of back to back, daily radiotherapy would classify their experience as ‘easy’. I described myself as a seasoned pro, not to a Medically Trained Person, but in my head and probably on this blog. To the Medically Trained People, I somewhat arrogantly sped through the list of side effects and I had very few questions prior to my consent. I just wanted to get on with.

In terms of usage of time (if you exclude the travel), I suppose radiotherapy is easy, and it is more for this reason that I declined the kind offers made by my friends to accompany me to the hospital. I attended UCLH for five days and only one of my visits lasted for more than an hour. On average, I would estimate my trips lasting no more than 30 minutes. The zaps themselves are even shorter, taking a matter of minutes, or even seconds, it’s hard to tell. It’s not like Goldfinger, you cannot see a green laser coming for you. After my first session on Friday 7th, I asked whether that was it when the technicians reappeared, because I was completely unaware of the procedure taking place. I thought that the machine buzzing and moving around me, was preliminary work before the real deal could take place. That expectation is coming from somebody with prior radiotherapy experience; my memory truly is awful. The majority of time my time in the radioactive bunker was spent taking my clothes off and putting them back on again. 

I do not recall experiencing any side effects after my first encounter with radiotherapy. That was just one zap on my right hip and the only thing left to remind me that I had it, after the pain went away were the three tattoos left behind. My second experience of radiotherapy was not as straightforward as the first, but it did not compare to a week’s dose of steroids. Approximately two weeks after the five sessions on my L1-L5, I endured two days of food poisoning like symptoms due to the zaps going straight through my stomach. This side effect, whilst absolutely horrible at the time, was predicted and after a day or two recovering, was quickly forgotten. 

Less easy to forget, but without the severe sweating, was the scar that treatment has left on my back. Initially, I say initially but approximately six weeks after the treatment, the skin on my back appeared to have been burnt. Burning or sores is a well documented side effect of radiotherapy, so I was unalarmed but itchy, I treated it with aqueous cream as instructed and thought nothing more of it. Approximately 15 months later, I developed Graft vs Host Disease as a result of my transplant and I was reminded of my radiotherapy once more. 

I could go on and on about my back, but all you need to know is that as a result of the GVHD, I still have significant scarring on my back. The scarring is in fact so unslightly that it was commented on several times during my most recent week of radiotherapy. One Medically Trained Person with dulcet tones reminded me to moisturise, to which I politely told her that moisturising would not cure this particular ill. I actually wanted to laugh in her face at the stupidity of her comment, given how many doctors I have discussed this ailment with and how all of them have been left scratching their heads. I did not laugh in her face though, because her comment was only stupid to me (and maybe Mamma Jones) who has lived through the saga, or what feels like a strange X-Files-like marking that is my back lower. 


Exhibit A – I know it is gross

Despite my back and the hideousness of it, going in to my most recent treatment, I still thought it was going to be easy and the side effects minimal. Perhaps it is because I did not have the time to think about it. In fact, when it came to asking questions, I asked only two. The first question, given the fact I just wrote two paragraphs about it and shared a rather nasty picture of it, was about scarring. Of the three areas being treated, the one requiring five sessions was on my upper spine and call me vain, because I can be, but I do not want to have a similar scar that would be visible. One scar like the one I have is enough. It’s a story and an occasional show piece. Two scars, with one of them on a visible area of my neck is just unnessary. Only time will tell if history repeats itself. Unfortunately, I cannot apply the cream provided by myself, so I am reliant on the kindness of others to rub cream into my naked body.

My second question was about diarrhoea and whether I would get it again. Nobody wants to get diarrhoea, especially the sort where your stomach cramps constantly and  sweat falls from your forehead to the floor. Flashback warning! I just recalled having to remove all my clothes whilst on the toilet the last time I had radiotherapy induced toilet issues. I cried too. Horrid. So yes, I don’t want that. Unfortunately for me, I had one off zaps to my T10-L1 and my left ileum; both of which could have gone through my stomach. So far, I had three days of cramping that was easily treated by a few doses of Buscopan (never underestimate the power of Buscopan, I’m an advocate and I believe it should form part of any personal drug stash). 

I am yet to mention fatigue. I knew that the treatment was going to make me tired, especially as the doses accumulated. It made me tired last time and I expected no less this time around. I suffer from fatigue daily, so I thought that it was barely worth a mention. Fatigue impacts so much of my life already, it’s as common to me as water. Nevertheless, I prepared for more fatigue than usual. I purchased ready meals and purchased food that Housemate could cook for me. I bought some plants for my bedroom and replaced my broken aromatherapy defuser, to ensure that my room was a serene and calm environment. So convinced was I that I was going to manage it with relative ease… 

You’ve guessed it. I’m eating my words. I’m chewing down on them, masticating slowly before I humiliatingly swallow them and choke. 

I do not know if it was because I had more radiotherapy than I had had previously; or because I am physically weaker than I was when I had the previous my treatments, but I found last week incredibly difficult. I struggled. Put it another way, it was anything but easy. 

Pain. I was in a lot of pain. Hell, that was the reason I was having the radiotherapy in the first place. Unfortunately, the start of the radiotherapy coincided with a deterioration of my pain. A vast deterioration. I had taken to wearing my sling all the time (bar bedtime) to take the pressure off my back, which did alleviate some of my symptoms but there was a time limit to it. Don’t get me wrong, I felt pain whilst wearing the sling too, I was just in less pain. If I was not wearing a sling, I could not stand up straight. The pins and needles in my arm would be constant and my elbow felt like something was taking a hammer to it. I know I am doing a terribly job at describing my pain. It was in my back, my left arm, my legs, I felt it everywhere. It was all consuming.

As the week of the 10th April started, I had  forgotten one crucial thing, and that was that radiotherapy can cause more pain before it relieves it. By the Tuesday, after I had had two sessions on my upper back and the two one off sessions, I remembered. The radiotherapy seemed to enhance every pain I had. The pain in my ileum became instantly worse. It felt heavy and the pain pounded like a heartbeat. My back, well, my back felt like everything was wrong. I couldn’t lift my head or turn it. I had the occasional spasm. I even struggled to get in through my back door because I couldn’t lift my leg high enough. Essentially, I moved like the pre oiled, rusty Tin Man. Sleeping on my side was impossible. Sleeping full stop was difficult. 

My words do not do what I felt last week any justice at all. Know that I frequently yelped in my pain, occasionally I produced uncontrollable grunts. The pain, as does my pain today, got progressively worse as the day went on. Doing something as simple as getting ready for bed had to be broken down, because the act of taking off my clothes, putting my pyjamas on, pulling down my bed sheets and setting up my five pillow sleeping tower seemed impossible feat. 

Despite fighting to be independent and at times, doggedly so, I relied on Housemate heavily. As I could not bend down, he had to get my food out of the oven, fill up my water bottle, add ice to my drinks, put my post radiotherapy cream on my neck and do up my bra. On the Thursday, Mamma Jones had to drive to London after a full day’ work, and drove me back to her house because I could not lift my suitcase nor get myself to the train station. And because I felt so rundown that I needed the Mum Love and I also though that Housemate needed a break.
The above is not solely the fault of the radiotherapy but it definitely played a part. I do not think that this was a ‘woe is me situation’. I really hope I do not come across that way. I was genuinely scared by how limited my movement became; that should be enough to convey how difficult things became.

In addition to my overly documented pain, there was the fatigue. The fatigue was easier to manage. If there is one thing I am used to managing, it is my fatigue. That said, I did manage to fall asleep in the waiting room of the Radiotherapy Departmemt. I walked in, sat down and within 10 minutes I was fast asleep. I know it was 10 minutes because I arrived at 14.30 and the Technican called my name at 14.40. 

I completely underestimated the toll the treatment would take on my body. It’s radiation. I should have put two and two together. In my head, this was just the equivalent to taking a paracetamol. On the Monday of treatment week, in addition to the daily zap on my C5-T5, I had the one off zaps on my ileum and my T10-L1. Oh my gosh, such was the power, I felt instantly felt sick. It was a miracle I did not vomit in the taxi on the way home. By the time I arrived at my flat, all I could manage was to roll onto my bed after finding an Ondansetron (to manage my sickness) in my drugs sack and there I stayed for 90 minutes in the foetal position. I could not move. Everything felt weak and stiff. I believe my attempts to talk actually manifested in a mumble. When I eventually came round, I discovered that I had dribbled on my pillow and chin. There are reasons why I am single. That evening caught me completely off guard. Once again, I found myself panicking, worrying about the cause of the illness, despite realistically knowing that the cause was the radiotherapy.

Finally, in addition to feeling tired, sick and excruciating pain, the radiotherapy made me sweat. Instantly, after each session, I would have a hot flush. By now, I am used to hot flushes but the post radiotherapy ones were severe. One day, on the first day, I sat in the hospital’s main reception for longer than necessary because I was trying to work out how I was going to wipe my sweat off the plastic seat without anybody noticing. You’d think I would have well rehearsed this move by now, but apparently not. I think the radiotherapy had sent me a little doolally. Or perhaps it is my medication. My reactions and my ability to think feels much slower, less reactive.

A week on from my radiotherapy ended and all I can do is wait. I have no idea if I am going to get an upset stomach in a week’s time, or if I am going to get burn marks on my neck or hip. Not only am I waiting for the bad things to occur, I’m also hoping for the treatment to work. At the moment, I can feel my pain improving slowly. Slowly over the last five days, I  have gradually felt the sensation in four out of five fingers on my left hand return! That deserves the exclamation mark. Truthfully, I do not know if the improvement in my pain level is due to the radiotherapy or last week’s increased medication. I just spoke to a Medically Trained Person and she suspects it is the medication. So, wait some more, I shall. 

So much waiting.

Perhaps me saying that radiotherapy was easy, was wishful thinking. If you say it, it will come true. I know that is complete bollocks, but some sort of positive thinking is a good thing. Right now, as I end yet another epic blog and take in that I had a week of radiotherapy and treated it like it was just a regular day, I realise that I am exhausted. Absolutely exhausted.

That much at least, I know.

EJB x

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A Lesson in British Decorum

Please not I accidentally published this blog early because I have limited control over my fingers; this is the final version (unless I reread it during a bout of insomnia and decide to correct my typing errors).

University College London Hospital acted with the greatest of haste following my MRI and all round bad results. Not only did they make sure I was referred to Bart’s within days of our meeting, they also referred me to their Radiotherapy Department. I am not sure of the particulars or what happened behind the scenes, but I do know that I saw my Medically Trained People on Thursday 30 March and I was informed on Monday 3 April that I had an appointment at the Radiotherapy clinic on Thursday 6 at midday. Not only did I have an appointment at midday, but I also had an appointment at 14.30 to complete my pre treatment measurements. The treatment itself was to commence on Friday 7 April. 

Now, I know I just threw a lot of dates at you. In a nutshell, in order to be left opened mouthed with administrative awe, you just need to know that within the week of receiving and telling me about my MRI results, the hospital had scheduled in my treatment, which was to start a mere eight days later. Things were moving fast. Need I remind you, that this was all planned in the same week I visited St Bart’s to discuss and consent to the clinical trial. The start date of which, was dependent on my radiotherapy. All of this was also within a week of being told that I had stopped responding fast enough to traditional treatments. What a mouthful.
It was to my benefit that things were moving so fast. Mercifully, it left me with little time to dwell.
Not having the time to stop meant that I was able to get myself into what I call ‘Game Mode’, without stepping into the usual self pitying pitfalls. I walked in to the Place Where A Lot of People Know My Name on Thursday 6 April, ready to go. My head was high and my lipstick was on. I know that things would have happened around me even if I was not ready to go. Mentally however, it was important to me that I felt ready for the various treatments that were soon to be thrown at me, and there was a lot to be thrown at me. After feeling like I had been hit over the head with a Le Creuset griddle pan for a week, and allowing myself to cry for most of that week, the game was on. I was ready go. 

So, after all that internal fighting talk, Thursday arrived and it was time to sit down with an unknown Medically Trained Person. This was not my first time having radiotherapy; it was my third. I had previously had a one off session on my right hip in the October of 2012, and a five day session on my L1-L5 to remove a mass in August 2014. The purpose of my previous treatments, were the same as this current treatment, and that was to manage and reduce my pain. 

Previously, the Radiotherapy Department came along and zapped said pains away; and it is for that reason that I was absolutely desperate to have this treatment.  It shone through. My pain was worsening day by day. Even before I walked through the door into the Medically Trained Person’s office, my desperation was palpable.

During my appointment I was informed that instead of the treating just the two areas that had been ruling my life, they would be treating three. The main area requiring treatment, the area causing the majority of my pain was a ‘mass’ pressing on my C5-T5. That’s my spine by the way for anybody who thought I didn’t have a back bone.  I think ‘mass’ is a nice way of saying something else, but I did not enquire further. To treat said ‘mass’, I would be receiving five zaps over five almost consecutive days. A weekend got in the way of it being truly consecutive. Anyway, so far, so good. I saw the MRI image of the ‘mass’ and I thought to myself ‘yep, that’ll do it’ as I hunched over once again and grimaced in unbearable pain, wondering if I would ever have full sensation in my left hand again.

Also requiring treatment was my left pelvis, which I knew about, but from that appointment forward, I would only be referring to it as my ileum. Simply because ileum is a great word. My ileum would be treated with a one off blast of radiation. The third area to be treated, and also with a one off blast, was my T10-L1. The doctor said that there was ‘something left over from last time’. Again, despite being in my Game Mode, I chose not to ask any further questions about this. I trust the Medically Trained People, and I was happy to leave all the science and decision making to them.  I might not have known about this particular problem, but what harm can a one off blast of radiation do? The 2% chance of a secondary cancer is hardly an issue for me now.

Such was my desire for my pain to be relieved, if they were offering more, who was I to decline it? So, I fast forwarded through the list of side effects and signed yet another yellow consent form. 

Downtown Abbey has a lot to answer for. Stereotypically, British people are believed to be well mannered. We also apologise a lot but that doesn’t fit into the title and narrative of this blog. On a personal note, if I was not well mannered, I would incur the wrath of Mamma Jones. Thus, I made sure that prior to my departure that I thanked the Doctor not only for seeing me, but for seeing me so quickly and in advance of making the pain disappear. It was not a one off thank you, it was an over excited, cannot believe my luck, repetive thank you.  I might have even squeaked. It was the sort of thank you that could easily be described as embarrassing. I embarrassed myself and probably the doctor. I did not care. I do not have the brain power at the moment to adequately express how much I needed and wanted the radiotherapy without simply repeating myself; I really needed this treatment. 

Next up, in this seemingly never ending blog, was the pre-treatment measurements. Now, I am going to assume that the majority of you have not frequented or required radiotherapy at UCLH. It’s a different world to Huntley Street’s cancer centre. It’s in the windowless basement of the main hospital and every member of staff speaks in soft dulcet tones, to match the soft colour tones of the walls. They also introduced themselves to me at such a rate that remembering their faces, let alone their names was next to impossible. 

There is one word I would use to describe the staff I encountered that afternoon and that word is ‘nice’. Everybody was so nice. I said as much to them. They were all the epitome of nice.

To be measured for the radioactive zaps, these particular Medically Trained People needed to access my hips, chest and back. In order to access these places, I needed to remove my clothes and it is this circumstance in which I encountered British manners at their most uncomfortable. The episode went a little something like this:

Technician: [soft dulcet tone] Now Emma, I just need you to remove you top and your jewellery. 

Me: Okay.

Technician: Actually, can you take your bra off as well? We’ll leave you alone for privacy.

Me: No problem, do you need me to take anything else off? I’ve had a lot of medical procedures so it doesn’t bother me.

Technician: Um [looks at my jeans] can you take your trousers off as well? You can keep your underwear on. We’ll give you a gown but you’ll need to keep it undone at the back.

Me: Sure, are you sure you don’t need me to take my knickers off? I truly don’t mind. After you have to have your mother take you to the toilet and bathe you at the age of 28, nothing really phases you. Well, it doesn’t phase me.

Technician: No, knickers are fine. [The three people working on me then left the room to give me the privacy they promised, something that contradicts what follows]

Me: [Now dressed in an undone medical gown, but still wearing my necklaces, which I could not remove myself due to my pain] I’m done.

[The three female technicians then come out of their office, one helps me to take off my necklaces and they ask me to lie down on the measurement contraption]


And so, I did what I was told. I lay on my back with the gown flapping at either side of me. It was not comfortable. The three technicians started to work over me and described everything they were doing to me in their dulcet tones. They kindly explained that they needed to look at my body to complete the measurements. My naked body.

As the radiotherapy was going to be on my neck, lower back and left pelvis, this translated to looking at my chest, hips and the top of my lady garden. Yes, I wrote lady garden. For information, when I relayed this story to my nieces, I referred to that area as ‘my peach’. 

For my chest, I had to remove my arms from the gown which was then pulled down to reveal my less than pert breasts. After some talking and looking, they drew a cross (I found this out afterwards) on the area known as, if I were wearing my bra and standing up, my cleavage. For my lower back, they were able to use the previous tattoos. 

Now, here comes the best bit. To access the necessary area of my lady garden, they very gently and apologetically pulled down my M&S black cotton briefs so they were resting just below my buttocks, and then covered my exposed front with a piece of hospital issue blue tissue. The process continued to be narrated by those dulcet tones. The purpose of the blue tissue was to protect my modesty. 

So there I was, lying on the machine all but naked were it not for the hospital gown acting as a sheet, my pants hanging below my bottom, and a piece of hospital issue blue paper towel covering my genitals when one of the technicians used something wet, I assumed it was an anticeptic wipe, to clean the top of my lady garden. It was at this point that I started to hot flush. The area was inspected closely, and the tattoo I had there in 2012, unlike the ones on my hips had faded, thus requiring another tattoo. 

After I had been through the machine where I had admired some animal stickers stuck to the top of the machine for children’s entertainment, the ladies returned to the room. This time round, I received one and a half new radiotherapy tattoos. I got a brand new one on my cleavage and the half belongs to the touched up one on my not-to-be-seen. Once that was done, I was done. I just needed to get up off the machine, which in my case, is always easier said than done. 

I cannot get up, after lying flat on such a hard flat surface by myself. It has been four years and eight months and I still cannot do it. So, I very politely asked for assistance, which was willingly given. As I sat up, flanked either side by two strangers, the undone gown still acting as a blanket fell off exposing my breasts and my bare bottom. It was too late to protect my bottom, but I was able to cover what I unaffectionally call my Saggy Maggies by putting my arms through the sleeves of the gown. As I put my legs down and stood up, the blue paper towel that had been protecting my lady bits fell to the floor, and my pants defied gravity and stayed up despite being rolled around my upper thighs. Once up, the technicians once again left the room so I could get dressed in private. 

In private? Really?

As I said early on in this tale, I am comfortable with my body enough to expose whatever parts of it the Medically Trained People need to see. I am not embarrassed by it. I understand it is something that needs to be done, and in the grand scheme of things that I have had to do since my diagnosis, getting naked does not register as remotely noteworthy. 

I did, however find my experience on that Tuesday as noteworthy. In their attempts to be polite, to protect my modesty and to make me feel comfortable, the technicians achieved the opposite. Fortunately, I can see the funny side of standing all but naked except for some rolled down knickers and an undone hospital gown. It just seems strange that their approach to nudity, a very British, hush-hush approach to nudity, made me feel more exposed than if I had removed all of my clothes in the first instance. 

It was an approach that ran through the entire department, despite my attempts to be visibly carefree when it came to disrobing. When I attended for my actual treatment, the room was equipped with a modesty screen for changing, which I chose not to use for anything but storing my belongings and hiding my difficulty in doing up my bra due to my failing arm. And yet, I still went through the same convoluted format. I was not asked to remove all my clothes right away, I was asked to remove them one by one. When it came to zapping my ileum, once again, I was asked to keep my knickers on only for them to be rolled down, at which point my nether regions became reacquainted with a piece of the hospital issue blue paper towel. 

I found this episode to be embarrassing too, not because I was naked but because I had a hot flush during the procedure. I hot flush all the time, but hot flushing whilst somebody I do not know is helping me off a flat surface wearing nothing but pants  rolled down to my thighs with a hospital gown round my midriff is an uncomfortable experience. It is exceptionally uncomfortable when several seconds after standing, a damp piece of hospital issue blue paper towel falls to the floor. At least I made my nieces laugh. And my friends.

And with that, this particular lesson ends.

EJB x


P.S. I made Housemate take a picture of my cleavage tattoo. It probably made him feel uncomfortable, but as you know, I’m down with my naked form. Here it is, nearly naked. It’s only fair that I share it.

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The Fear – Part II

You have stopped responding fast enough to traditional Myeloma treatments’.

Fuck. 

Few things warrant the use of such foul language, especially in the written form, but a ‘fuck’ or a ‘bugger’ is definitely suitable in the situation I found myself in last Thursday afternoon. I didn’t say it out loud; I was still able to maintain some level of decorum.

I think I know what that statement means. It’s not the worse news I could have received, but it is not far from it. It wasn’t what I was expecting. It is a polite way of saying that my treatment isn’t working. Not working. Stupidlyhow could I have thought my treatment was working when I was in so much pain? In fact, after my first full cycle on the recently licensed drug I was on, I told a Medically Trained Person that I did not think it was working. I wish, with every weakened bone in my body that I was wrong. I wasn’t. 

 Am I dying? 

I don’t think I thought all of this or processed it when I was in the Medically Trained Person’s office.  I was in shock and I was trying to hold myself together. I didn’t hold myself together. I couldn’t speak, not initially anyway.  The first words I uttered, did not sound like fully formed words. It was an explosion of emotion. I tried to say that I wanted my hip fixed but that became a sob about how overwhelmed I was with the news. That’s right people, in this circumstance, I simply chose to yelp ‘I am so overwhelmed!’. Then I sobbed. It was not a cry, it was a snot-producing, face-pulling sob that was softened when I saw the tears in the eyes of the Medically Trained Person.  

I haven’t had long enough.

Thank goodness for my Big Sister. I had no doubt that she would step up in this kind of  situation and step up she did. I think I had become deaf to what was happening around me. To me, everything that happened in that room was a blur, but she wrapped me up in metaphorical love and got on with what needed to be discussed. It could not have been easy for her. It is one thing to be afraid of something, but facing that fear head on, whilst holding somebody else up, is on another plain entirely. I know that it was not just my fear either. What is happening to me, what was said in that room, is a fear held by everyone I know (and happens to like me). I will readily admit that I lost control. For the rest of that afternoon I repeatedly tried to compose myself, but failed miserably. I didn’t know that tears could flow so uncontrollably. Nor did I know that I was capable of talking such complete and utter drivel. But, for the rest of that afternoon and evening, I had my sister sitting next to me, looking after me and discovering the many benefits of a banana milkshake.

Am I a failure?

Anyway, let’s move on from this emotional mumbo jumbo; we have some real business to get to. In a nutshell, despite three stem cell transplants and many, many rounds of treatment my disease is currently active and my paraprotein is on a rampage. It is so active that I have to have radiotherapy on the distruction it has created in my body. Whilst the drugs I have been taking including the one I changed to in January are doing something, the cruel circumstance is that they have not been doing enough. This leaves the question I asked just a few months ago, what else is there?

Is this the end of the line? It now seems an almost rhetorical question. 

I do not wish to bore you with the history of Myeloma treatments, largely because I’ll reveal how little I have chosen to know about it. I’ve been deceiving, most of you will know far more than I do on the subject. For where we are in my story, all you need to know is that new myeloma drugs tend to be derivatives of older drugs. They are related.  This means, in a shake-your-head, we’re-out-of-ideas sort of way, the Medically Trained People do not think that such medications will work on me for much longer. It’s hard to process that, I almost have to sound it out in slow motion. And then repeat it. And repeat it again.

There are too many things to say about all of this and I don’t have the distance or the benefit of an adequate pain and drug feee sleep to eloquently describe how I feel. I know I am angry. Since I was diagnosed, I did everything I was asked to do. Almost anyway, I haven’t lived in a complete sin free bubble, but I have lived and I have done what I have been told to do. I took my various treatments, I coped with the disappointment after disappointment and still, I get out of bed almost every day and take the pills I have been prescribed. Yet it has still gone wrong. I used to joke that given my age and the flocks of people trying to help me, that I was a medical marvel. I willed myself to be, terrified that I wasn’t. It now transpires that the only thing marvellous about my treatment history is in how powerful my Myeloma has been. Perhaps I should have gone gluten free as one nosy Parker once offered as superior soundbite.

I do not believe in any kind of divinity. I have nobody to prey to and nobody to blame. A stranger once told me that my lack of faith was the reason I had cancer, but let’s face it, there are a lot of knobs in this world.  When I add it all together, I just think something bloody awful has happened to me and no matter how much I have fought it and continue to fight it, it’s stronger than I am. Long gone is my bereavement for my lost children, old age and a picket fence. My fears now seem so much more urgent.

I don’t know why this happened to me, but for the last week, I have felt ashamed. I know that I did not bring this on to myself, even if I do love white bread too much. I do not believe that somebody’s willed for this to happen to me. And yet, I feel like I should have told my body to do more. Fight harder. Forget about being polite and smiling at everyone, I should have been a total bitch, constantly in attack mode like the scary army captain I met once in the cancer centre who made me cry when she announced it was her sheer willpower that caused her continued remission. I have willpower. I have multiple reasons to live, and yet I currently live in a world where I cannot do up my shoes.  

I should have reacted better to my medication and treatment plans. All those odds, all those odds and I was always on the wrong side. I’m angry that all of this is making me think about what this world will look like without me in it. I didn’t realise I have so much to lose. I watched my mum run around after me at the weekend, making me food and making sure my neck was adequately supported by my pillows, I listened as my nieces nervously tried to make me laugh as I tried to rewind my tears, as their Mum tried to keep us strong, and with every vibration, I could feel my friends trying to cheer me up or express their anger. I feel like I have let all of them  down. 

I made so many half promises about my treatment. This one will work. We will go on that trip. I can make it to that pub. Seeing the waves of broken promises scatter around me is my new definition of fear.

But what the hell is all of this? I cannot stop yet. I must not stop yet.

The Medically Trained People aren’t quite ready to stop and nor should I be. Last Thursday, when Big Sister’s concentration powers really kicked in, I was told of a clinical drug trial at St Bart’s involving antibodies. I could give you the medical blurb, but I think I should save that for a rainy day. All you need to know is that it is completely separate to all other treatments I have had. It might work, it might not, but the space on the trial could be mine. It took a few days, but I can now firmly say that I take back everything negative I have said against that hospital. 

A lifeline. 

It may sound foolish, given my very limited options, but the thought of leaving the comfort of UCLH once more added to my devastation. That hospital, in both my successes and failures have held me up. I have no other point to make on this subject, but it’s important. Ever the pragmatist however,  as I said last week, I think I said it anyway, if it is not clear to you yet my memory is a haze; ‘it is what it is’. I have to get on with it. 

On top of all that has come before this,  we had to discuss my need for radiotherapy. The practicalities. You can imagine how long this one clinic appointment felt. So much to take it in, so much to fathom. Ahead of last week, when I was suffering from worry filled sleepless nights, I thought the good and bad news hinged on the what was found in my MRI.  Clearly they did not, and now it seems easy to forget that I need some fairly urgent treatment. I have something in my neck that shouldn’t be there for crying out loud. And yet, the radiotherapy feels like it has become secondary to the ‘big news’ despite how quickly I have once again found myself increasingly immobile. 

I do not know if it is in the form of lesions or tumours or the generic term of bone disease, but I require treatment in my neck and my hip. The area in my neck has caused the majority of my recent problems in my upper back and my arms. Again, this may sound minor, but wondering why and how I have lost the sensation in half my hand for the last month, is a blood-curling. To even consider how the knee bone really is connected to the leg bone is mind blowing. If anybody has seen me move in the last month, you would have witnessed how much this pain has made me squirm. The pain and this is something that has not happened in a long time has been at a cry inducing level. I have cried not because I feel sorry for myself, I mean I have done that too, but because the physical discomfort has been so great.

It’s a juggling act though. As I am now due to start a new treatment at a different hospital, my doctor was reluctant to also zap (a term I have used a lot over the last week when discussing my radiotherapy, mostly because I can use an emoji) my pelvis. It may lower my blood counts and it will make me feel groggy, but even in the whatever state I was in last Thursday, I knew I needed my hip fixing. To get through my next, I have to be as fit as I can be.

I think it goes without saying, but the last week has been a whirlwind. It doesn’t feel like a week. In whatever timeframe I am now working in, and I guess it is a new timeframe now, I feel like my world has been turned upside down. I have so many things coming from so many directions, that I laugh at the meagre everyday complaints I have been able to read on social media. I used to think I was a great multi-tasker, but when it comes to affairs of my life, and the time that is left in that life; I do not have the foggiest.

I have to give myself a few passes. Firstly, I have been put on a ‘pulse’ of steroids, that is controlling my pain and will hopefully hold the myeloma whilst the Medically Trained People are doing their juggling. It is a ten day course of as much steroids as I can take. That’s right, ten days, decreasing by half every other day. It’s a well known fact that I cannot take a lot of steroids, but to put it into perspective, the first day’s dose was more steroids than I usually take during a full cycle on my old treatment and each weekly dose of that put me in bed for two or three days. I am awaiting for the inevitable crash increasing alarm and dread.

Secondly, I am currently on a lot of pain medication including sedatives. I basically rattle. 

Thirdly, I am once again struggling to look after myself more than I usually struggle to look after myself. I cannot bare weight in my left arm, my right arm is starting to go the same way and every activity, whether it is washing, eating or cooking seems impossible. In this mindset and the physical prison, I have to arrange my forthcoming radiotherapy sessions and attend the necessary testing for the clinical trial. And don’t think for one second, I have done any of that without my lipstick on. On Monday, which again is a story for another day, Mamma Jones and I spent 12 hours in London waiting, meeting new people and satisfying my steroid induced hunger. Today, I have seen a doctor, looked at some scan results, been measured and had two radiotherapy tattoos. 

Lastly, I just ask you to add everything up, consider everything I have said in this here blog and attempt to fathom where on earth I can begin. I have to begin somewhere after all. Welcome, to another volume in my possibly soon to be ended story of my life. 

To clear my head, Mamma Jones took me on an epic adventure to a National Trust property last Friday. I thought you might appreciate the evidence that I am still here. Getting out of bed.

So, there it is my current story. It’s not cohesive, it’s all over the place because I am all over the place. It’s new. It’s daunting. And my goodness, it is fucking scary. 

EJB x

P.S. Kudos, and I mean bucket loads of the stuff must go to my Medically Trained People and the NHS in general. In just seven days, they have seen me transferred to St Bart’s for (hopefully) the start of a clinical trial. UCLH somehow got my name into the mix of said clinical trial and St Bart’s seem to be moving whatever needs to be moved to accommodate me (no jinx yet though). They have also liasied with the radiotherapy department, resulting in an appointment today which included all my pre treatment measurements, ensuring that all areas requiring treatment are attended to. The treatment for which is starting tomorrow and will conclude next Thursday.  I have no more words in me to describe my gratitude.

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