Tag Archives: Friends

Six Weeks

It’s been two months since I last published a blog and let me tell you this, it has been quite the two months. After having this wretched disease for over five years, I thought little would surprise me. Well, I expected the whole looming death part to have a different trajectory to the routine I am used to, but as I said, I expected that to be slightly different. I never considered what the steps will look like getting from the relapse stage , to the end of the line stage. I always assumed it’d be easy but increasingly, I feel I might have been far too optimistic.
Somehow, in five years, I had settled into an uneasy routine with My Myeloma. It’s quite simple really, I would have some sort of treatment, which would work for a bit, then it would fail, then the Medically Trained People would somehow magic up another treatment for me to start, and thus the cycle would start again. 
I had five years of this. Don’t get me wrong, some horrible things happened along the way; it shouldn’t make the list, but losing my hair is still up there in the shitty events. I didn’t really enjoy any of my transplants and I definitely did not enjoy the time I had to spend five days in St Bart’s because I caught Influenza B. On the plus side, I thoroughly appreciated any drug regime that could be taken at home. I had a few of those.
What am I saying, all of that is in the past? If the last two months have taught me anything, and I am still trying to decipher exactly what further lessons I needed to learn by the age of 33 about my cancer, is, that Myeloma is a load of fucking shit that if there were a hell, it should be confined to purgatory trapped under a full, infected bed pan, never to bother nice (even horrible) individuals again. Oh yes, just to keep you up to date, I have also learnt about bed pans recently. And sick bowls. And those cardboard things that collect one’s waste by resting on the loo seat. I know it all.
On 7th September, I returned to UCLH for a clinic appointment. Prior to that I had found out that the trial at St Bart’s was no longer working and I had been experiencing what can only be described as extreme and unbearable pain that I had blamed on doing too much on holiday. The pain itself was predominantly in and around my right rib cage. 
As I had self diagnosed every relapse since 2012, I had spent about a month begging for some imaging. St Bart’s took no action, I would question if the staff knew my name, but thankfully UCLH did know my name and once they had the necessary images, man, did they take action.
I was admitted to UCLH immediately on the 7th September following an appointment, during which my family and I were told we were coming to the end of the line of treatment. Not only that, but there was also something wrong with my neck. I say ‘something’ because I think it took me well over a week to get my head round what a compression on one of the C vertebrae meant. I don’t recommend it. I don’t recommend developing a mass that pushes through your rib cage either, Alien (or at least that’s how I like to picture it) style. It cannot be sugarcoated. I entered that hospital with Mamma Jones and Big Sister in a bad way. 

And that bad way only worsened over the next six, that’s right, SIX weeks…

I don’t even know where to start. If you are independent, like to toilet alone and enjoy walking around, I’d say what followed would be your worst nightmare. It was mine. 

You may have deduced that not all was or is well with my spine. Due to the compression and the location of it, I arrived at my bed to be told that I was no longer permitted to walk. As in, no walking at all. Not only was I not allowed to walk but if I wanted or needed to be moved in my bed, I would have to be rolled by four Medically Trained People. My head and neck, could not be elevated anymore than 30 degrees. Three weeks later, this changed to 40 degrees and the news that I could roll myself, but by this point, the damage to my ego had already been done. Not to mention the damage to my legs for not walking for three weeks.
Despite being in denial about it, shitting is a necessity that eventually cannot be avoided. The day I could not avoid it was Day 11 in hospital when there were only male nurses available. I’m a 21st Century Woman, so I went ahead and let the team of four roll me onto a bed pan. I did not say anything when they had to roll me again to clean my bum. Nor did I say anything the next day, during one of my five daily bedsore checks, when a different Medically Trained person discovered a lump of faeces stuck in my bottom from the previous day. 

That was a low point.
Washing myself alone, was and remains impossible and for the duration of my stay, washes were restricted to hand towel baths in my hospital bed. If I was lucky, the Medically Trained Person cleaning my nether regions might have even shut the window to my room for some privacy. Due to staff shortages, during the last week of my stay, no washes were offered and I went a week without being cleaned. Needless to say, washing hair is extremely difficult and something that has happened twice between the 7 September and now.
Thankfully, due to what I like to call ‘performance issues’ I was given a catheter for the first three-four weeks of my stay. After that, I relied on my good old pelvic floor muscles to stop me from soiling myself. How can that be when you cannot walk, I hear you ponder? The answer is long, boring, excrutiatingly painful and another blog post. In the interim however, you just need to know that I have a full back brace, handcrafted to fit my body and imagined perter boobs, which I am allowed to wear to mobilise. 
…………………………………………………………….

This really is a story of never ending gibberish. Maybe grab a cup of tea. Have a wee break. I’d have one with you but my mouth is currently tainted by the delectable taste of 60 mg of steroids per week, so I am only able to stomach the taste of fruit juice. 

Where was I? Right, my health. In addition to the bony stuff, the really smart Medically Trained People had to find out what was wrong with me and if there was anything that could be done about it. This period felt like it would never end, with the feedback I was getting changing nearly everyday. I’m not going to regurgitate all of it, just trust me when I say it was very confusing and everyday resulted in me hysterically crying and Big Sister getting angry. 
I lost count of how many CTs, MRIs, ultrasounds and x-rays I had, but I know it was a lot. It was not uncommon to be collected by the porters, without any clue where I was going or why. I knew where they were taking me on week one, when I had five fractions of radiotherapy to heal my ribs, but as for the rest, it was not like I was in the strongest position to argue or question. I simply did.
Things went downhill relatively quickly. By Day 4 I had tested positive for Paraflu, which gave me a chest infection and resulted in me being relocated to an isolated room on a ward where the staff are nice, but significantly understaffed. One night, I rang my bell for 2.5 hours before I saw a nurse. On the plus side, it meant that I had my own room with a nice view over London. A bonus when you consider the fact that the woman opposite me on the shared ward addressed me as ‘Emily’ and wished me well. 
The hardest part of having the lurgy was that I did not see somebody without a mask on for five weeks. Talk about dehumanised. 
The chest infection persisted, so for extra buoyancy, I also developed sickness and diarrhoea and a temperature. It was lush. 

Notice how I am yet to mention My Myeloma? There’s a reason. My Myeloma failed to behave in the manner of which I have become accustomed. For the first time since I was diagnosed with the wretched beast, I was afraid of it. It wasn’t behaving how I have known it to behave. My paraprotein was the highest it had ever been, and no matter what drugs were tried or the volume of fluid pumped into me, my calcium would not shift below 3.0.

And still I carried on. It may be the biggest test of my willpower and personal strength (because I really have no meaningful life until I am rid of the brace), but I unequivocally told the Medically Trained People that I am not ready to give up with my life yet. As long as the treatment maintains a reasonable balance between quality of life and those dastardly side effects, count me in. Sign me up.

I’m not ready to die yet.

Unfortunately, we soon ended up spending some time thinking about my death. I completed my will and paid for my funeral. Once I was fortunate enough to be on a reasonable treatment regimen, I suffered from what I now believe to be called an Acute Kidney Injury. At the time, it was badged as something far graver than that. I cried for what felt like days. I got so angry with My Myeloma, I told it I hated it. I begged for a reprieve, identifying many people other than myself who deserved the award for ‘Most Deserved Recipient Of The Most Stubborn Myeloma in This Fair Land.’ I really am not saying that other people deserve this illness; I was just surprised to learn that I had not come to terms with the fact I have it. Death seemed so much closer than before I walked into clinic on the 7th September. I don’t know when it will come and that’s the scariest part. How long is my piece of string?
My need for tears grew when I was taken off my morphine, which I had taken in slow release form everyday for five years. There were nightmares and ticks, to accompany my sickness and diarrhoea. I won’t lie; it was a tough, sleepless few days.
Do not fear, I will not prolong this anymore than I need to. They require near constant testing, but for the moment, my kidneys are behaving. It took a week or so for them to turn around. For how long they’ll stay in this state, only time will tell…

Six weeks after I entered UCLH, on 19 October, after a lot of pushing from my family, I was discharged. Gone were the at least daily bloods, out with the cannula resulting in the constant beeping of unanswered alarms. Goodbye to the four hourly observations, even at 3am. Welcome to sudden and ill prepared loneliness with an absent of nurses. So long institutionalised regime. Hello privacy. After six weeks, I am to fend for myself once more. 
Just between us friends; It’s fucking terrifying.

The view from my hospital window

EJB x
P.S. New treatment regime (Velcade twice weekly for three weeks;20mg Dexamethasone the day before, of and after Velcade; Veneoclax eight pills daily

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An Almost Quarterly Update

You may be wondering, ‘what the hell has Emma been up to?’ I wouldn’t blame you if you are, my life is an unpredictable rollercoaster of super fun times that many people would wish to emulate. It is for that reason that I don’t keep my blogs up to date and not because I am too tired, stuck in my bed and unable to follow the plot of Pretty Woman… Sure, I can always dream. The closest my life could come to a rollercoaster would be the teacups, where one goes safely round and around  finding the occasional thrill within the monotony, let’s say, like waving to somebody you know each time you pass them as the teacup swirls.

I’m being  a little harsh. I had a jam packed February, one that has left me feeling exhausted, sick, frustrated, happy and satisfied in equal measure. It was jam packed for me, jam packed for somebody who spends at least two full days a week in bed and has 4 good hours a day on a good day. Looking forward to it, way back when in January, I thought my plans impossible. 

Before I explain my month of (relative) excess, I should tell you what is happening with my body. Spending so much time in bed, measuring time by cycles, I struggle to fathom actual time now, but for the sake of this story, let’s go back to November. I realised that my paraprotein level was no longer falling as quickly as I would have liked. The dastardly thing had started to plateau, which by January meant the Medically Trained People took as a sign that I should be on a different treatment regime. It had stopped working after all. It was a decision that made sense to me, but worried me at the same time. It may have plateaued but on the other hand, it was not going up, could a new treatment offer more?  

In all of this, I am unable to forget that myeloma treatments are not infinite. There are only so many treatments that exist and if I work through all the possibilities available at a 6 monthly pace, what does that mean for my longevity? 

I’ll let you think about that for a while, because I have been thinking about it for a long old while. Three failed transplants and another failed treatment; I do not think it is pessimistic to put two and two together and work out the obvious. Though, I imagine my nearest and dearest do find my arithmetic something gloomy.

On the other hand, I do not think it is healthy to dwell, so let’s move on. 

My new treatment was introduced at the beginning of January. Unfortunately, I caught Influenza A, which is a bog standard flu to the masses, but in me, it meant everything had to stop. It meant isolation and face masks. Points must be awarded to my CNS who decided to swab me after I fell asleep in the waiting area, despite my protestation that it was only a slight cough and I was fine. Catching it early meant that the anti flu medication worked, meaning it only took me a fortnight to get over the flu instead of the six weeks it took last year. I was also able to suffer from my own bed instead of a hospital bed, for which I am most grateful. 
As an aside, following this experience, I will inform the Medically Trained People of any new ailment as soon as I experience it. Well, within 24 hours later. Maybe 48 hours. What I am trying to say is that I will not try and manage it alone now, the consequences of a slight bug are not the same as they once were. I must use my common sense and being a martyr does not equal common sense as much as I think it makes me look like a badass.

So, I got over the flu and once my throat and nose had been swabbed once more, I commenced my new treatment. I am sure scientifically there is a difference, but practically there is not a great deal to distinguish between a regimen of Revlimid, Dexamethasone and Ixazomib and a regimen of Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone. I still take one of the drugs nightly for three weeks, with one week off. I still have to take steroids weekly and I still feel rotten as a result. On the plus side, I do not have to deal with the sickness caused by the Ixazomib. The downside is that I have not had a paraprotein result from the new treatment yet and thus, I do not know if it is working. 

The last month has made me pause to consider whether said drugs are working and that is not just because I am plagued by pragmatic pessimism. I am in more pain than I was in December. I hope this is a result of over exertion in February. The jury is out on that one.

I am not the sort of cancer patient who reads up on new treatments and overly questions the Medically Trained People. I have chosen to trust them, rather than invest my energy trying to find a better solution. Some may disagree with this approach, but that is how I manage. I only mention this because Pomalidomide has only recently been made available as a regular treatment in the UK and I did not know this. It makes me hope that there will be new drugs and combinations of drugs, that will broaden that scary finite list that I (and so many others) am a hostage to.

Prior to last week, I had been on constant treatment for five weeks instead of the usual three weeks and I could certainly feel the difference. It felt like everything about me from my brain to my toes had slowed down. I don’t think my recent fatigue was helped by starting my new treatment straight after the flu either. Just trust me when I say, it has been exhausting. 

Despite the dense fog of exhaustion where I found myself for almost the entire month, I have had an exceptionally time of it. My compromised body handled February pretty much the way I expected it to handle it. With difficulty.

I was honoured to be invited on a Stag Do, taking place in Amsterdam. Yes, a Stag Do. That’s positively normal behaviour for humans of my age. I thought long and hard about all the issues I would have to face, weighed up the pros and cons. Limited walking, early nights and limited energy compared with the 21 able bodied thirty somethings also going we’re definitely high on the ‘con’ list. All of it pointed to not attending, but where’s the fun in that? Giving in to it, no way Jose!

Inevitably I scrimped, scraped, borrowed and I went. That act alone felt rebellious. I also travelled without medical insurance cover for the simple reason that I could not afford  a £260 minimum spend for a three night trip. That wasn’t rebellious, it was reckless and it won’t be something I would dare repeat, especially to a location covered in snow and ice. I usually live in a world where I would not step out of my front door if there is a mild frost. It meant as great a release as my trip was, I could never fully relax because I feared something would go wrong. I had even planned a contingency of Mamma Jones driving over to Amsterdam to rescue you me, were something to have happened to me.

Prior to the trip, I decided that I would loom knit a hat for each attendee. If you were still wondering what I did for January and the first 10 days of February; the answer is hats, lots and lots of hats. Sitting on my sofa making hats. Dreaming about hats.  I think it was a project that whilst garnering a great deal of personal satisfaction for being able to complete such a task, it put me on the back foot energy wise before my busy February even began. I gave myself no time to relax because I was proving a point that did not need to be made. 

I won’t go through everything I did in Amsterdam. Just know that it was a tonic. A very large tonic. I never once had to lift my suitcase and whenever I left our accommodation I felt protected by a group of bodies who were almost as worried about me slipping on the ice and breaking a bone as I was. It is quite different going away with a group of friends then going away with one’s mother. If there was a secret test, my friends certainly passed it. In a nutshell, the only person to make me feel like there was something wrong with me, was me.


This computer in Amsterdam said I was Happy. It was correct.

Leaving Amsterdam, walking through the airport, I realised that my body had done all it could. I feel for the person walking with me to the gate as he was met with a constant whiny chorus of ‘I can’t walk anymore, I can’t walk anymore’. On returning to London on a Tuesday evening, I got straight into bed, took my nightly dose of chemo and my weekly dose of steroids and stayed in bed until the Friday. I had to leave temporarily on the Thursday to go to a meeting, but that required Marvel Studio-like strength and resulted in the most horrible feeling of weakness that had me yearning for my bed.

On that Friday, the one where it took me until 15.30hrs to have the energy to get out of bed despite my cleaner trying to change it, I was due to travel out of London for a wedding. For somebody that has four hours of energy a day, on a good day, this was a mammoth task. Gargantuan. I was not going to miss the wedding however, it was too important and I too stubborn for that to have been a possibility. Somehow, and I really do mean somehow, because I have no idea how I achieved this, I managed to pack, shave my legs and meet my friends at our car rental for 17.30hrs.

Once again, like in Amsterdam, I felt fully protected by the people I was travelling with. They were so considerate of my limitations, I felt like I was getting my energy through them. They drove me to my hotel, financed said hotel and just made the whole thing possible. It made it possible for me to watch a dear friend get married, with my body only giving up two hours before the wedding was due to end. Give up it did. With all the excitement, drugs and post Amsterdam fatigue, by 22:00hrs, talking was proving to be impossible. Walking, from an afternoon of standing and not putting my feet up, had slowed to a shuffle accompanied by constant pain from my pelvis to my neck. Unavoidably, having lost my ability to speak and most of my leg function, I had to leave.
This is me posing next to, I do not know what, at said wedding. 

Leaving early made me so angry. There are times when I tolerate my body, but crawling onto my hotel bed trying to make a nest of pillows large enough to ease my pain, I hated my body. I was embarrassed by it. I was annoyed that I could not speak to the friends who where there as much as I would have liked because my body had automatically switched to battery saving mode. Whilst in that mood, I also became irritated that the same rules applied in Amsterdam. I may well have got the most I was capable to get from it, but I did not get to experience everything on offer. Myeloma always makes me feel, even temporarily, that no matter how much I participate, that I am on the outside looking in. 

Fortunately in this instance, I took 10mg of Amitriptaline and I was able to have some resemblance of a reasonable night’s sleep. Waking not to a feeling of melancholy, but to a hangover mixed with pleasure that I was invited and able to attend the wedding, I forgave my body. It has not been forgiven yet. 

All my common sense tells me that when one is as deep into the myeloma journey as I am, I have to see these trips and experiences as a bonus. In February, I had two big fat bonuses. 

I’m paying for all of this now. On the Sunday I returned home, I got into bed, took my steroids and stayed there until the Wednesday. I then travelled back to my parents’ house and spent some more quality time in bed, feeling the burn.

Ignoring the puppy draped round my neck, I think this photograph sums up ‘the burn’ pretty well.

It is now almost two weeks later and I am still tired. I am always tired, but sometimes, just sometimes, I can pull a rabbit out of a hat and experience something different. 
Running throughout this whole period, in addition to my pill popping ways, I also completed my annual Oscar challenge. To quote an Oscar winning movie, I will ask myself when frustration kicks in, how do you like them apples? 

EJB x

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 The Notice Board

Way back in 2013, I spent 11 days of my life in a room of great bleakness. It is difficult to conjure up the mental differences between slight and great bleakness, but  for me it was a room that encompasses everything that was bad with this word. If only it were the interior design of that room that was a problem. The centrepiece, if such a room could be deemed to have a centrepiece that was not its bed on wheels, was a grey notice board with three signs to the right hand side of the board. The biggest sign told me how to wash my hands properly (but I think I moved it there) , the second poster told me if and why I would be eligible for the Patient Transport Service and finally, there was a leaflet, that if you looked really hard at, you could see the 12pt font printed list of all the additional fatty foods I could order from from the canteen due to my not eating right and the neutropenia. I still cannot get over the fact that eating badly is considered to be better for you than a piece of fruit in any situation, but there it is. The PTS sign had some late 90s clipart on in and somebody had definitely used the ‘Tools’ section on MS Word on all the documents.  I hated that notice board. I have also realised that I still hate that notice board. 

The closer I got to April’s transplant, the most frantic I become about ensuring that I would never have to look at that grey notice board again or it’s posters. One of those things could not be achieved because all hospitals all over the land, have posters telling visitors how to wash their hands, and I currently have my sight and can pee, so put two and two together. Developing a board that would be nice to look at became almost integral to my planning. I mentioned in to friends and the importance of of was mentioned in my counselling sessions.

All in all, I think I visited four art gallery shops, the BFI shop, two Boot’s Pharmacists for printing purposes and Amazon. I had mini pegs, string two different styles of pins and just under 15 postcards to accompany my ten or so photographs. I was going to be the best notice board that had ever been nailed to a wall. 

And then, realistically being £20 lighter, it turned out that I did not need it during Transplant Number 1. I am not kidding when I say that I was slightly disappointed by this. I was disappointed that I was not become sick enough to to be admitted to hospital to see my notice board come to fruition. 

Unlike the majority of you folks out there, I realised that I would very soon be given the opportunity that did not involve committing a crime or other institutionalisation, to be in a room with a notice board. I hoped and I waited and I packed my ‘art’ with wanting. Then last Wednesay happened, I was admitted. With breath that was baited, I was taken to Room 10. I knew the word ‘room’ meant I would be in my own room, but in the few short pushes in the wheelchair I closed my eyes and touched EMan’s paw. It worked, and  because when the door opened, I saw not a notice board but a white board. I’m an artist of many a media, and just as soon as I received confirmation from three different Medically Trained People that the board was not there for medicinal reasons, it was go go. I was ready for my Art.  Given the change in background, Mamma Jones had to go out and buy scissors and tape, and given the passing of time, I misplaced a few photographs and postcards. 

In the end, not all of my support network was represented, and I had to explain to far too many people that some of the photos were not of my own (presumably failed) wedding, but it worked. I had directed a little something of my own to make what was a 7 night stay in hospital, that very bit not bearable.

  

And yes, it had fairy lights too.

And double yes, it’s back to being a white board.

EJB x

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Subject: Me, Me, Me

The following is an email I sent to some of the Support Network in preparation for today and beyond. In some of this, I will repeat things that I have written previously, but in my current, highly rational state, I think this is a good indication of where I am, and what I need to come. Why send a private email you ask? Well, firstly it saves energy, and secondly, I hope to dispel an ideas that my medical plan is the same as having a wort removed… Mind you, until you have pooped your pants and hallucinated green goblins bursting out your stomach because you are in so much pain, it’s all relative isn’t it? 

Please note, some of the names have been removed because this really is, all about me.

From: Emma Jane Bones

To: Friends

Sent: In the early hours of 29 March 2015

Dear All,

Hello. As I have had the last minute go ahead from the powers that be, I thought it was time for me to send an email outlining just what the hell is going to happen. 

Fear not dear friends, it is not an emotional email, just one layered with practical points about how my year is going to roll from now on. If some of that sounds emotional or distressing, it was not my intention. BLANK, The Counsellor suggested me levelling expectations. I think this is levelling expectations.

I know that this may seem self indulgent, but the transplant clock is a ticking. Plus, although it will not be emotional for you, it is an emotional subject for me, so it is easier for me to write it down rather than to say it. Secondly, I hope it’ll save me from telling people the same thing over and over again, forgetting who I have said it to, and thus bore you into silence.

Before I get going, I would like to thank those of you who have organised and/or participated in recent activities. To everybody else who I have not been able to see, I thank you for still continuing to care. It’s all very much appreciated. More generally, I had hoped I would have been freer from this for longer, but that was not the plan, so I thank you for still being around.

I am going to try to keep this brief, but who am I kidding, I can never be that brief. 

The Plan

1 April
I will go to UCH on Wednesday morning, when all being well, I will be given the high dose chemo. I will initially be staying in ambulatory care, also known as the hotel, with my mother. 

Thursday is known as ‘Day 0’ in the biz and this is the day I have the transplant. 

3 April onwards
I will be in Ambi Care until the poop starts or my temperature hits 38, or I show any other type of illness. There is no real way of knowing how long this will take, last time I was out for 5 days, but that means nothing.

Once I am sick, I will move into the tower on the 13th or 16th floor.  They say expect to be in for 3-4 weeks, but last time I was in for 10 days… I know which option I would prefer. 

My hair will go FYI. My feelings towards this are surprising. I did not anticipate this much dread, but the dread is there. I’ll be shaving it off after I have had the chemotherapy, maybe on Friday. If anybody fancies doing this for me, let me know? I have George’s clippers.

On Discharge
Once I am well enough to go home, I will be heading back to BLANK until I am well enough to reasonably look after myself. I say ‘look after myself’, what I actually mean is able to return to the flat and only rely on BLANK for a few things instead of everything.

During the time between transplants, I doubt I will be able to do that much. Afternoon trips to the Picturehouse might be doable. Definitely/maybe no alcohol. As with everything else, we will just have to see.

For those of you with birthdays during this time, I will endeavour to attend, but do not hold it against me if I do not. 

June/July
I will go to St Bart’s for the second transplant. Initially I will be an outpatient, there is a chance I will remain one for the whole procedure, the odds they gave me for this are 50/50. 

Don’t let this outpatient nonsense fool you. Whilst the risk of a particular negative result is no longer 40%, it is still high. Those figures are not based on the first few weeks after the cells are introduced, it is based on the months (and I mean months) after and whether my body decides to completely reject my sister’s cells. If this happens, it happens, but fingers crossed it will not. Best to say that now, so you have realistic expectations. It may not be an operation, but it’s a serious thing. 

I have been told that the best case scenario post number 2 will be rashes and gut problems, with a side of fatigue. I’m hoping to go back to being a size 16. Anecdotally, the fatigue is something I have not yet experienced. I am afraid of this the most. I am afraid of only having the energy to lie in bed for months on end and become bitter. I do not want to become bitter.

I’ll hammer this point home, the recovery is going to be long. Real long.  The guidance says no international travel for two years, but I think this must be wrong. 

Hospital Visits for Transplant 1

Whilst I am in the hotel, I will be accompanied by my mum or sister. On Wednesday, I imagine I’ll be too tired when it is all done and I’ll just want my bed, so no visitors that day unless you want to watch me suck ice cubes during the day. 

Thereafter, I will be able to receive and I will need visitors.

As I’ll need my mother a great deal throughout the year, I have said she does not need to be around too much whilst I am in hospital. This will mean that I will need visitors, because being stuck in a room for 10 days (or more) is extremely isolating. 

Here is the problem, I may well not have the brain capacity to schedule your visits. At the start, I’ll be better at it, but when the pooing and vomiting starts, I’ll probably find texting back stressful. I’m not sure how to resolve this issue, other than just ask you to come and hope I’ll be free. Or you can organise it amongst yourselves. Not practical I know, but I’m just anticipating the worst case scenario.

There are no visiting hours, although the mornings are when the doctors do their rounds and when the cleaners come. You probably do not want to see them.

It sounds obvious, but if you feel unwell, do not come. I will have no immune system. Don’t buy me anything.

In between visits, feel free to keep in contact, I’ll be tired and might not always reply right away, but text messages are always fun.

You

After my release, I will be suffering from fatigue. It’s a word you will get bored of. The fatigue, as I said earlier, will get worse after the second transplant. I am not exaggerating when I say that getting over the last transplant’s fatigue was the hardest thing I have ever done. It makes it quite difficult to trust my emotions.


As such, it would be prudent for me to say that there will be times when I become depressed. I hope not many, but it will happen and that will make me question pretty everything and everyone. In turn, this may make me appear like an irrational and mean bitch. All I can say to this is please bear with me, and try not to give up on me. I have an aromatherapy stick this time for relaxation, and you never know, it might just be what I need to keep it all together. If it is not, I will  apologise to you in advance.

Not being able to get out of bed, for long periods of time, it is easy to feel forgotten and lonely. So, I’ll need one sided friendships for a while. Colin will need a break sometimes too and I may need people to cook for me and other things. All this will require me learning to ask for help, or you could just be forceful. That will be tough on you, because I will become quite dull.

My life will probably be quite myeloma obsessed. Let me reassure you now, this will not be because I like to be the centre of attention or talk about myself. I am always more than happy and willing to talk about anything else. You just have to start that anything, for, I will not know of anything else unless you want me to tell you what is happening on my Facebook feed.

Realistically, I will not be as well as I am now, until the new year. I might be pleasantly surprised, but the odds for that, are not in my favour.

Other

Last time I had a transplant, I sent text updates for major transplant developments. If you wish to receive these again, do let me know.

So, all that is left to say is thank you. I cannot emphasise this enough, but you are all appreciated. I know I have upset people in the past for not showing or saying this enough, but, most the time I think I have. I’m quite forgetful don’t you know.

Emma 

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Constructive Criticism

A few weeks ago, I found myself leaving my flat around 12:30hrs for a hospital appointment. Such is my norm, my chosen mode of transport to achieve this was a taxi. Unlike other people, I rather enjoy the occasional natter with a taxi driver. I should be clear that this is not because I am starved of stimulating conversation, it is just because I like to talk. So, I go in the taxi and said something like “oh, it’s a nice day isn’t it?”. I did this for two reasons, the first is because I am British, and the second was because it was a nice day and it was the first time that day I had seen the shining sun. It turns out, that making these comments was a mistake.

It was a mistake because the driver then spent the next 20 minutes or so telling me that I needed to be more active. Not only did I need to be more active, but I needed to ensure that I was leaving my flat before 12:30hrs everyday and that it was crucial that I continued to keep my mind stimulated just as much as I keep body active. I know, I know, I am missing some key parts of the conversation in which I told him I had cancer. However, I think asking to go to the Macmillan Cancer Centre in the middle of a week day, let the cat out of the bag.

I can take a fair amount of criticism. I am pretty sure that in my early twenties, I wasn’t always the lovely human being you see before you today, so I endured the odd bit of unsolicited insight into my negative personality traits. A lifetime of being overweight, also prepares one for having a thick skin against people who feel like they would know better than me on how I best live my life. These days, in the days of the head tilt and sympathy, criticism levied at me, at least to my face, is surprisingly rare. If I do receive any, I usually let it float over my head like I do with the majority of negative thoughts.

That said, there is one subject, a rather broad subject, that I think nobody has a right to comment on, and that is how I manage My Myeloma. I guess, given the percentage of my life this takes up, I also do not appreciate any critiques on how I currently choose to live my life in order to make it through my treatment.

The taxi driver did not know all of this, it was the first time we had met after all, but what he believed to be a throwaway conversation with a cancer sufferer, I found to be deeply insulting and naive. Above anything though, his comments just really, really pissed me off. I know they pissed me off because I am still thinking about them today and they made me think of other similar comments that have pissed me off since I was diagnosed. It has also made any similar comments made to me since, fist clenchingly annoying. It has all led me to believe that there is one golden rule of people dealing with me and My Myeloma; unless you have something positive like ‘wow, I just do not know how you do it’, or something with concern like ‘how are you doing?’; do not say anything about how you think I should manage my myeloma. You are not me, and as much as I recognise the care the comments stem from, nobody but me lives with it 24 hours a day. Everyday.

Although I sound particularly dogmatic on the subject, it is not because I am ungrateful that people are concerned about me enough to say things that they think will benefit me in my quest to survive. I am not ungrateful. I like to know that people care. The truth is, there is nothing people can constructively say to me about myeloma, or say that is just a blatant criticism of my behaviour, that I have not thought myself at least ten times over and tortured myself at least ten times over in the process. You can be damned sure that the arguments I have in my head about how I should behave, are far worse then anything anybody can say to my face. After more than two years, I have learnt that managing my own criticisms is hard enough and I do not need others dredging them up out of their own altruism, care or in the odd case, meanness.

On one side of the coin, I give myself a pretty rough time about how long I stay in bed, how little I spend in bed, how long I stay in the flat and whether it is sensible to leave the flat. On the other side of the coin, I pride myself on how, despite my many misgivings about the length of time I spend in bed and in my flat, I still manage to get out of bed everyday. In getting out of bed everyday, I also pride myself on how I still manage to hold my head high when I need to stay in bed.

The pride I have in my own behaviour means that any comment or criticism does not just feel like a mere comment or criticism. I feel like it is somebody attacking my core being, something they may have an understanding of, but they will never truly understand because they are not me. In this, I include fellow myeloma sufferers who overtime, have told me how I should feel when I do not feel that way. Once, somebody told me the side effects I was experiencing post multiple Velcade injections could not be happening because they did not experience them. We are not the same. I also include friends, one of whom, I discovered put me through a rather difficult time during my remission because they felt that I had not expressed my gratitude enough for their kindness in my blog. Trust me, for a few minutes on most days I worry that I will never be able to show enough gratitude for the way the majority of my Support Network have been there for me. I did not need the silent treatment when I was trying to move on and up in the real world, to realise this. It set me back.

The most irritating comment is being told to get out of bed or off the sofa and that doing so will make me feel better. It’s not a malicious comment of course, but it is one that seems to negate the work I have done to allow myself to stay in bed. The work I have done to know when I need to stay in bed. I would not have been able to say this a year ago, but I know now that when I stay in bed, it is because I physically need to stay in bed. It is not because I am depressed and it is not because I am lazy. I am talking a lot of drugs and I endure daily back pain.

I am strong, but I am not infallible.

Everybody is always going to have an opinion on me and my illness. Selfishly, when these opinions go against my own, I take offence. I bruise from it and I have been battered enough by My Myeloma to sit at home worrying that others think that they could manage this better than I do. The comments make me doubt myself and they make me doubt how far I have come from the naive 28 year old in the hospital bed on that fateful Friday afternoon.

And do you want to know how far I have come? Right now, I am able to watch a medical television melodrama. I am able to think about my future good and bad and I am able to detach from it when I need to. My next sentence makes no sense, but I did this by myself. I did this all by myself, just with a teeny bit of help and love from those around me.

It’s My Myeloma after all.

If you must criticise something, tell me I need a hair cut or do what Mamma Jones did the other day and tell me that I need to trim my nasal hair. I can take that. Just.

EJB x

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A Mini Break – In Pictures

Always one to embrace modern history and scenery, I was surprised by how few photographs I took when I was in Berlin. Do not misinterpret me, my eyes still exploded with glee at the sight of things not Flat, Hospital or Deeping, but the dot between eyes and iPhone were not always connected. This oversight had absolutely nothing to do with the fact that I wanted to look all cool and nonchalant for the locals, and thus the fear that a camera would ruin my sweaty vibes.

So, yes, I went to Berlin for three nights and three and a half days. All I am saying is thank goodness I took my fan. It was three and a half days of sweaty bottom, and it could not have been a good experience for my fellow travellers. There, in the rather large city of Berlin, I was able to experience a level of independence I had not experienced for a long, long time and that my friends, gave me warm and fuzzy feelings when I went to sleep eight hours earlier than everybody else. I am not sure whether I invited myself to Berlin, so I am most grateful to my friends for accommodating me and letting me have first dibs on the apartment’s lift.

Before I share my wondrous photographs of tourists hotspots with you, let me tell you something that I observed. It is very easy to go away for a mini break. I do not know what I was expecting, but I hopped onto a plane and the next thing I knew, I was in Berlin. When I left Berlin, I hopped onto a delayed Easyjet plane and before I could listen to a long album, I was back in the UK. I swear, things were not that simple in 2011. Mind you, in 2011, my insurance was ever so slightly less than it is now.

I am just going to throw another observation out there… I may have walked too far.

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To prove to you that I was in fact in Berlin and not stealing photos from Pinterest, and to prove that I was excessively sweaty, I have stolen this one from Facebook:

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Inside I’m Dancing

Once upon a twenties, there was a girl who loved nothing more than dancing and sweating whilst dancing and grinding and say then day that particular movement was dancing. Said girl’s only aerobic exercise for a long while, was the dancing. The pleasure she would get from the shuffle to a deep base would be evident when her hands would creep up over her shoulders. She was no ballerina. She did not have the elegance of a ballerina. Her dancing usually was reserved to prancing around her bedroom in her pants or it was directed towards a DJ booth. She had rhythm. Unsightly rhythm.

Said girl no longer dances. Not really. She has lost her rhythm. Her movement is restricted to a wobbly shuffle that she calls walking and that only occurs because she is heavily medicated. Her government has assessed her and deemed that she should only walk 200 yards at a time, thus pulsating her radiotherapy experienced hip really is out of the question. If she did not find twerking distasteful, the cement in her spine would still be a reason enough not to do it. Her arms are similarly weak and as sometimes these limbs cannot be raised above her shoulders, the distinction for her between walking and dancing, she felt, would be slight.

People adapt obviously, and our heroine has become partial to some private bed dancing, which is much cleaner than it sounds. It involves lying flat on a mattress, a bed really because she would struggle to get down on a mattress, and then wriggling her feet and hands. The activity usually takes place when the lady in question is intoxicated and attempting to recreate the euphoria of yesteryear whilst proudly listening to Katy Perry’s Fireworks. For her, this activity is still rare.

Rarer still is any form of publicly busting a move. Walking with a stick in hand is embarrassing enough for her as a 29 year old experiencing London nightlife, but dancing, her new ‘dancing’ would be impossible. Living in her brittle shell makes it difficult for her to experience London nightlife, so she would be unlikely to open herself up to the danger of being pushed and prodded on a crowded and slippery dance floor, when she is already having to manage the increased danger from the public that emerges through alcohol. There would be murder on the dance floor.

The loss was felt, until one day, after a few sherbets, in a room protected by her dear friends, she danced. For ten minutes before having to sit. She did not grind and she did not twerk, nor did she throw her hands in the air like she did not care. Importantly, she did not want to stand on the sidelines feeling self conscious and grieving. Deprived of obstacles, armed with her stick for back support, she moved from left to right to the sound of a beat. There was some backwards shuffling and even some sort of movement with other people. With stick in hand she moved from side to side. And she smiled.

Nobody bashed her and nobody drunkenly grabbed her neck and pulled it down because they were a moron, and nobody attempted to twirl her. She moved and she adapted.

It hurt her like hell the next day though, but if anybody were to ask her, she would have said that it was worth it.

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Selfishness

Myeloma stands accused of being selfish. It stands accused because it is selfish. No trial needed. Myeloma dominates and myeloma leads. I can sit here and tell you that it does not do those things, but I would lying. I have been accused of being selfish because of My Myeloma. I have also been accused of enjoying the attention I get from myeloma and enjoying it to the detriment of others. Unlike my statement about myeloma, which is a bloodsucking selfish bastard with a low public profile, I do not think the same can be said for me even if I am tooting my own delightful horn.

I think we are all, to some extent, selfish. I do not think selfishness necessarily makes a person horrid, and with that, I justify my existence.

People are always going to concern themselves with issues of self, no matter how much time they concern themselves with the lives of others. Before I was diagnosed, I estimate that there was a 50/50 split in terms of how much I loathed myself and how much I loved others. In treatment, post my diagnosis, that even split was unattainable, and I concentrated my thoughts on myself more and more. I wish I had the capacity to support others the way I know I am capable, but in treatment, I was not capable. Of course some of the reciprocal arrangement that is friendship remained, just, I deduce, to a lesser degree. Myeloma did not make me wholly incapable of multiple thought, it just makes it difficult to execute them.

I regret this. I had to prioritise. I am somewhat ashamed to admit it, but I concluded that my need was greater than others. I developed a crude, patented formula, in which I multiplied tales of woe and illness with the chances of remedy then divided it against personality, and in almost every occasion, I was top of the table. I love my Support Network, and I tried to maintain balanced friendships, but inevitably, some things went a little skew-whiff.

I am not saying that myeloma is the worst thing that can happen to somebody, but it is pretty high up there on the scale of awful things and that required most of my attention. I may sound entitled, I do not mean to and nor do I wish to be, I wish that I did not need to gather so much of my attention on myself, but that is the way it is. There was a time when myeloma dominated everything. I understand why people would get frustrated by it, I did do, and unlike everybody else, I had and have no respite.

There have been occasions when my formula has assessed that somebody else’s need for understanding, thought and love was greater than my own. Like My Myeloma, I see that the pain of what they have gone through or are currently have to go through, which cannot be taken away or absorbed. It’s excruciating. It is easy for me to forgot that other people experience grief too and unlike many things in life, there is no immediate remedy. I wish that the world was not like that. I imagine that for them whatever it is they are going through, becomes all consuming and everything that happens in between is play acting, despite whatever will there is for it to be real. In these circumstances, I hope I can show what a friend needs to show.

I have devoted a lot of thought recently to my selfishness and by default, how this has influenced the way people view me. On the one hand, I do have less sympathy for others, on the other hand, I empathise more with others. I believe the latter makes up for any deficiency gained from the former. I love more and I care more. I might not show it correctly, my myeloma may make it impossible for me to show it, but I do. My life is too short for anything else.

Myeloma has many downsides, many ways in which go ruin a life. When jt comes go my empathy, and how I care for others, I think myeloma has made me a better person. It made me prioritise. Of course view is somewhat one sided, I’m thinking about my self.

EJB x

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2013

Can I really do a review of 2013 two weeks late? The answer is yes, I can do whatever I want to baby, because I ain’t lost.

And so, here we are, 2013 has ended. It came to an end a while ago, I have been reflecting that much about it. It was quite something wasn’t it? 2013. Just insert whatever cliche you want, because that is what I am going to do. For me, 2013 was unequivocally and irreversibly the hardest year of my life. I did not not expect it to be. At the start of 2013, I thought that 2012 was going to remain the hardest year to date, but I was wrong, that honour, at least for the time being, befalls 2013.

Congratulations 2013. You shook me to my core.

2013 was full of many downs until November came and we had a reasonably big and unexpected, up of rather gargantuan proportions. That was nice, except I still do not believe it. The build up to November though, all that trial and all that torment, all those downs, have meant one thing, and one thing only, and that is, that 2013 changed me. The same person who woke up in the early hours of 1 January 2013 sober and maudlin with a paraprotein of 19, is not the same as the person who saw it out drunk with a paraprotein of six, 14 days ago. I am yet to discover whether this change is for the better. Either way, it is what it is.

In review then, I now give you My Myeloma driven, 2013.

January proved to be rather fun, because after the first few days, for the first time in a long time, I was allowed to be drug free. I had just finished PADIMAC, I was planning for my transplant, and I was feeling more positive than I had felt for a live long while, for I had no crash week to anticipate or factor in to my schedule. It also snowed and that my friends, made me sad.

In February, I was heading full steam ahead towards March’s transplant. I was experiencing new drugs and I was getting ready for the chapter to come to an end. It was exciting and nerve wracking all at the same time, all I knew was that I was ready for my autograft. In this month, I also had a little ill advised bump’n’grind on Valentine’s Day, which then caused several months of torment and anguish, because it was a deed done out of myeloma pity and trust me when I say that my self esteem did not like that one iota. In addition to that blip in human interaction, I also argued with a friend and that was not pleasant at all.

March was the month that changed the way I view My Myeloma. With March came the Bad Day and with that news, went my positivity and I do not believe it has come back to me yet. I hated March. In addition to having to put my life on hold for a another four months, I lost my hair and I started a new course of treatment. I really did hate March.

April and May seem to roll into the same months for me, they were dominated by my medication, the steroids and progressively worse fatigue caused by the thalidomide. Oh, it was marvellous. Uncertainty most certainly featured in every waking thought I had during these months too, bar the one day at work I had where I managed to complete a day without thinking about the fact I had myeloma. One day out if 365, that’s pretty good going. In May, on May 24 to be precise, I had a birthday. My first birthday with myeloma and this was a bittersweet affair, despite all the efforts from those around me.

June again was full of uncertainty until it was no longer uncertain and I was given a date for my transplant and the uncertainty was replaced with fear that the Medically Trained People were going to take it away again. March was their fault obviously and it was not the fault of My Myeloma and its excrement, paraprotein. So, for the last days of June into July, I had my fingers permanently crossed.

In July, my fingers were still crossed until I walked into Ambi Care on the 17 July. Despite the fear of it being taken away, I also experienced a very real fear of it happening to quickly. For a fortnight before I went into hospital, I felt that the transplant I had been planning for months and months on end was coming round far too quickly and I remember feeling unprepared. I also, in the weeks leading up to the 17 July, milked the fact I was having a transplant dry. I forced people to have fun with me and fun was had. Essentially then, for the first fortnight of July, I used emotional blackmail to make people be nice to me. It was a nice two weeks. I then went into hospital, had a little bit of chemo, had some stem cells given back to me and pooed by pants. I took a photograph of the incident and I am still to share it with you. Apparently, sharing it would be inappropriate.

Oh and I should probably add that Housemate became a Dad in July and for that little bundle of fur, I would become very grateful.

In August my long, underestimated road to recovery started and for me, this is when I felt myself begin to unravel. From August, my life stopped being all about treatment and it became about living, but it was not a living that I had anticipated before I had myeloma and nor was it a living that I had imagined all those times I lay in my bed dreaming of happier times. I also discovered in that month of being looked after by Mamma Jones and Big Sister, that my Support Network was realistically not capable of doing everything I wanted it to; it was not an easy realisation to have. It hurt, it gave me forehead ache and I am still trying to understand the revelation.

In September I moved back to London and attempted to rebuild my life, and slowly, very, very slowly, get my energy back. I happened to do that in October, November and December and I am still working on it. My improvement post transplant has been much slower than I ever anticipated. Sure, in those autumnal months, I learnt to leave the flat for longer than four hours, but it is not easy. Not easy is an understatement.

Although November was undeniably good, with the small thing I like to call Remission, I discovered that I simply could not rewind to my life before and I have struggled daily with that since. It makes it impossible to remember exactly what I have done since 7 November, because the overriding thought is that living with this is hard. I did not have that in 2012.

On a positive note, I have begun to socialise more, not very well, but I have. I was able to do the goddamn London Film Festival, which made me cry, laugh and sleep. It was, quite simply, my favourite 12 days of the year. Make of that what you will.

December is my recent history and it essentially was a month of trial and error, resulting in a snotty noise and an overwhelming desire to sleep. The latter was something of a theme for me in 2013, just ask my broken bed.

As for my appearance in 2013, well, that changed too. I lost weight, put on weight, lost hair, grew hair, lost it again and then gained a curly mop. I grew a beard. I did not wear any lipstick for a six week period. Needless to say all of this added up to some knocked confidence and the avoidance of mirrors.

This was my 2013. I feel bruised and battered from it, and as I repeat what I said when I started, I feel like I lost part of myself over those 12 months. I like to think that it is not lost forever like one of my hats, just waiting to be found in a drawer or at the bottom of my wardrobe when I can be bothered.

Here’s to a brighter 2014. I long for a brighter 2014. I have a cylinder to overflow.

Oh, I should probably add that as much as I dislike them in their role as the bearer of bad news, the Medically Trained People, specifically those in Haematology, were as marvellous as I have come to expect and for that they have my gratitude. For sure.

EJB x

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Acknowledgements

WARNING – This blog contains some uncharacteristic musings

I have forgotten to do something. It is not that I have forgotten to do something exactly, it’s just that I do not know how to do it. I want and I think I need to express my gratitude to my people for carrying me through the last 15 months. I know that I would not have been able to get to this current point, this remission, if it were not for the many people working away behind the scenes. It sounds trite perhaps, to say that I would not have been able to do it were it not for the support I have received, but it is true. In case you were wondering, this is going to get overly sentimental. Get a bucket.. Sure, I am
frequently pleased when people congratulate me on my strength and stoicism, but that it a facade. Any face I put on, or actual strength I have, derives from the people I have had and still have around. I have doubted it, and I have doubted them, make no mistake of that, but it is true. I imagine it is a feeling similar to the feeling the historical character Harry Potter had when he fought the evil Voldemort with his dead loved ones standing by his side. Like that, only my loved ones are not dead.

It does feel somewhat odd thanking people for something that is not over. I just have a time out, and I will continue to struggle and wobble over the myeloma mountains. I will have to continue to draw strength and perspective from those around me for as long as I have left, because the myeloma makes it so. This acknowledgement then, really is just a timely reminder to say that I still need you; it is attention seeking really.

I would be the first person to admit that My Myeloma has not been an easy ride for those around me. It has been hard and at times, traumatic. In case you were wondering, this may include exaggerations too. As much as I tried not to make it so, My Myeloma became the focus of all my relationships. One friend told me recently that people, like me, needed a break from myeloma and by that, they occasionally needed a break from me because the myeloma dominated so much, for so long. Now, I might not whole heartedly agree with the logic, but I understand the sentiment. Myeloma is tiresome. Supporting a weak, depressed sick person, or patient if you must, is tiresome and it is not always fun. I like being self obsessed more than the next person, but not to this degree. People have been there for me, more than I have them and this upsets me greatly. I really did try to make this not the case, but it was inevitable. I need to acknowledge in a forum other than in my head, that My Myeloma has made me less of the friend I wish I could be.

And yet, I look up now, and people are still here and for the most part, I really do not know why. My relationships may have changed, but there is not one person who was here 16 months ago, who is not here now. In fact, I feel like I have picked up a few extras along the way. Say what you want about myeloma and I feel like I have said everything, it really does bring people together. It also makes you feel as lonely as hell, but this is a nice blog. I look at a lot of people now and my internal monologue says slushy things that only I should hear, whilst I fight a desire to hug them tightly.

I do not know how to thank people for sticking by me. Prior to My Myeloma, I rarely expressed my feelings towards others, in anyway but my presence. I believed that my loyalty was enough for my friendships to endure. It may still be enough now, but My Myeloma has made me lose perspective. Medals would be too much, right? This blog is too much, right?
I considered thanking people individually, but then I remembered that although I have a cancer with no cure, doing so, telling people individually what they mean to me, would embarrass me, and I dare say it would embarrass them too, and I really should not be drinking the amount of alcohol required to lubricate those conversations. I thought about listing them on here, explaining the individual role they have had in making me get out of bed, but that too would not have worked, because inevitably I would miss people out or over thank one person and not another, thus causing an argument over something as pure as a Forever Friends bear, and as one friend pointed out at some point during this journey, friendship with My Myeloma and me is not competition.

At times during my first chapter I have felt let down, misunderstood and alone; and I have been confused by absence and silences. Now, however, the overwhelming feelings towards my family and friends are positive ones. I truly could not have done it without you, from your grand gestures to daily presence. So, please enjoy, my thank you;

I thank you for all of it. I thank you for not running away when my heart turned from stone. I thank you for phoning me every day and being my second mum. I thank you for being my mum. I thank you for understanding the medicine. I thank you for letting me be mean to you. I thank you for the sacrifices you have made. I thank you for always knowing exactly the right thing to say, and also for not knowing what to say. I thank you for waking me up every morning and being a pillar of strength for me even if you did not know that is what you were doing. I thank you for telling me when I was being an arse and shouting at me when I do not listen. I thank you for being normal and treating me normally. I thank you for coming to the hospital with me for treatment or waiting with me for my transport. I thank you for loyalty. I thank you for buying me milk and walking it to my flat. I thank you for offering to do anything. I thank you for force feeding me soup. I also thank you for all the cooked dinners. I thank you for all the books you gave me, that I have still not been able to read. I thank you for not letting a bit of myeloma and chemotherapy stop you from telling me off for over filling the bin. I thank you for playing Words With Friends everyday. I thank you for taking my mind off it. I thank you for taking me out. I thank you for always coming to me and sitting on my sofa for hours. I thank you for cheering me up. I thank you for my beautiful television. I thank you for all the legally acquired viewing. I thank you for showing me that family is important and I thank you for making your presence known. I thank you for continuing to ring despite me never answering my phone or returning your call. I thank you for reading the blog. I thank you for changing my bedding and hoovering my room. I thank you for taking me to the football. I thank you for letting me be petty. I thank you for listening. I thank you for acting as a protective barrier in a crowd. I thank you for everything and anything I may have missed above.

Most of all, I just want to thank you for being there, in all your different guises, in all your different ways. I also, most vehemently, ask you not to go anywhere. In case you were in any doubt.

I am very pleased to have met you.

Now, if you excuse me, I think I have to vomit.

EJB x

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