Tag Archives: sadness

Pleasure

I have been pondering in recent months the following question, it’s a question that goes round and around my head until I am down the well worn A road wondering about the point of my existence. It is a question that comes without innuendo despite the way I have decided to word it. It’s a question where to answer in the negative terrifies me.  The question, my friends is ‘can I experience pleasure, anymore?’

I suppose I could have substituted the word ‘happiness’ for ‘pleasure’, but I feel happiness is something that can be temporarily achieved in a 22 minutes episode of Modern Family. Pleasure, to me anyway, is something else. It’s prolonged and it involves satisfaction. Something meaningful that isn’t transmitted through my television. 

It has been a long dark autumn where I have felt that all pleasure and all opportunity to feel pleasure; that the function for which has been removed from my brain. I don’t laugh anymore. Long gone are the days when the innuendo sort of pleasure was met; melphalan and menopause put paid to that years ago. I’m not worried about that. To the all encompassing sort of pleasure of which I yearn, I don’t know what it should feel like anymore. How much did I really laugh before?

There are many days when I find myself waking up, knowing that the day ahead is going to be much the same as my previous day, and as with the day before, I will spend it going through the motions. Not emotions you understand, just motions. 

I don’t have a job, I get tired washing myself, there is not a higher purpose to my life most days then just taking my drugs, patting the dog and making sure I am out of the bed before Housemate gets home. I don’t have the functionality to do anything else.

I suppose, I do the absolute minimum to survive, especially on the days of steroid crashing and Ixazomib spewing. I wake, I sit, I eat and all to the soundtrack of my television. 75 percent of the time, I could not tell you what I have watched from one day to the next. I probably could not tell you everything I have watched today. 

On the days I can move further afield, I do the things I used to do that entertained me. Except now, they have to be done within a very tight social security allowance budget,  pass the necessary  considerations (constraints) like walking distance, seating and distance from home, before I can even leave the house. Evidentially, there are a lot of things I would wish to do that I cannot. Despite these obstacles, I do, somehow, manage to pass the time.  The most common feeling I get on return from any of these jaunts is, exhaustion. 

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Is it the Larozapam my brain asks? Is this indifference I have allowed to develop towards my life due to the multi-use drug I take to prevent nausea but others take for sedation and anti anxiety?  Or, is it one of the other 12 different medications that I swallow on a daily basis that has stopped me being able to feel? Have they brought this shield down that I cannot penetrate, and the weight of which leaves me all so very fatigued? Internal feeling of apathy, anyone? 

Of course, there is another theory. This one might be my favourite. I wonder if I no longer feel pleasure because I do not want to feel pain. Have I, since my relapse put myself in to an ultimate self preservation mode? Should I patent it? If I cannot laugh and feel happy, then surely that’s a decent payoff to not feel constantly scared and alone? For four years with My Myeloma, I was waiting for something positive to happen, it didn’t.  The sad truth is, I am now waiting for the ultimate bad thing to happen and I am praying that that does not come too soon.

Bar one week in October, I have not had a midweek outside of my bed  since I started my current drug regime five cycles ago. It’s an enslaught. Any strength I build up in the days pre drug crash, is depleted on the first day post my Dexamethasone and Ixazomib dose. Then with each day that passes, my reserves run lower and lower. Concurrently, for every time a loved one forgets that I cannot do anything on a Tuesday or Wednesday (and possibly Thursday) and then they invite me to do something on a Tuesday or a Wednesday, I go into the red due to my frustration, anger and plain old green jealousy. My life is lousy enough without having to repeat it five times a week.

In my last blog, I spoke about death. Not because I want to die, but because I fear that is what is left for me now. I hope it is not imminent, but all that depends on a variety of factors I have no control over.  It’s not the place or time to discuss these things in this blog, but I saw a figure a few weeks ago. A potential timeframe, and I really don’t have the capacity to think about what that means for me or for those in my Support Network, and if it is possible to balance that with the quality of life I have now. There are days when I would feel better off. 

It’s becoming incredibly hard for me to consider myself as anything other than an expensive perishable with a limited shelf life. Sure, I am Emma, I am EJ, I am me; but what does that mean now when so much of my identity has been erased? Most the time, I feel like a stranger to myself. 

Am I lacking pleasure because I am still the pre Myeloma version of me, just significantly shorter with less limbs, whilst everybody around me has managed to grow, some have even gone as far as to grow whole new humans in the four years that I have had this wretched disease?  

I was once told that my situation was too depressioning to be around frequently, so the easiest thing for somebody to do was to cease all communication and live their lives independently of mine. Understandably, I  worry about this becoming my legacy because I will not mprove now. Everybody wants to be around you in the first year of Myeloma; the numbers dwindle somewhat thereafter. 

The insecurities this has left me with are profound. I  try to avoid talking about myself (she says in a rather lengthy blog about herself and rolls her eyes) as much as possible. But then, what else do I have to talk about? I’ve already said I don’t have a job and I don’t remember what I did yesterday. Has my monotony made your pleasure disappear? Have I made you runaway yet? 

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There you are! 

Did you know I had a point at the start of this blog? It wasn’t that I am a bad editor,  because I think I have proven that point with what I have written above. No, my point was that my pleasure has not been lost in self pity. I have recently returned from a much needed two week break away from my medication. I currently have no idea what that two weeks away from medication has done to my body, but I know what it has done to my mind. It’s called perspective my friends and a dark cloud has been lifted. Not eradicated mind, lifted. 

It’s harder to see and it’s harder to earn, but believe it or not, I do still experience pleasure. Not the innuendo kind unfortunately, which makes my four weekly pregnancy tests quite the waste in resource. 

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I lost sight of my pleasure for a little bit; for five months in fact. I lost it all to fatigue. Fatigue has literally been ruling my life and I cannot emphasise this enough that fatigue is not just restricted to feeling sleeping. For me, everything slows down, everything becomes harder and everything whether it is an email or an existential crisis, seems a  much larger issue than it actually is.

Looking back, there were hidden and frequent pockets of pleasure throughout the last five months. The windows to enjoy myself are smaller and further apart but pleasure can be found and it has been experienced. By me. 

To emphasise my point, here are a few examples: any conversations with my nieces, being a party to Treat Yourself Sunday, talking Christmas wrapping with Big Sister, watching a movie at a friend’s house or maybe, just maybe bending the rules a little bit and staying out past midnight once in a blue moon. Or, it could be something as simple as saying goodbye to somebody and walking away with a smile on my face and a spring in my step. It’s in knowing that a friend cares enough about me to swim a mile a day for 26 consecutive days to raise money for Myeloma UK (https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/Emma-Boucher-Matthews). It’s going to the cinema whenever my body allows it, not falling asleep and writing about it in my little black book. 

In October, my some miracle and a little bit of understanding from the Medically Trained People, I was able to once again attend the London Film Festival 15 times in spite of my treatment. I got dressed and put makeup on everyday. I felt learned and alive until I got tired and had to spend a week in bed once it was over. I did not end up celebrating the 10 days I spent enjoying the festival, I wallowed at how quickly my body went downhill.

Most recently, I went on a holiday. An actual holiday. With a lot of help from Mamma Jones, I used my passport and I opened my eyes. From the minute we left these fair shores I experienced pure pleasure.  The holiday gave me a swift kick up my derriΓ¨re, and reminded me there is pleasure to be found everywhere. Even when the prognosis might not be what I want it to be. I need to find a way to remember this the next time the tough gets going.

Above everything else, I need to remember that my life is not a foregone conclusion yet, and I should not be treating as if it is. And,  in the words of Uncle Albert I also need to remember that  ‘I love to laugh. Loud and long and clear’. I really do want to be a merrier me.

EJB x 
P.S. There is still time to sponsor my friend’s marathon swim, which she completed yesterday. Just use the link above. 

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The Littlest Things

Yesterday, I decided it was high time for me to tidy my drawers, because I Housemate did his, and I felt like even more of a sloth than usual. I would like to confirm that I am lying in my bed as I type and I can confirm that
I am glad that I took the time and energy to do this. As I was doing the deed however, my emotions were mixed.

My drawers are a set of six, which sit to the lefthand side of my bed and house the things that do not need to be on show. Catch my drift? There is a jewellery drawer, a make up drawer, one and a half drawers of mementos, a draw of toiletries and other things one can purchase from a chemist and the remaining drawers are (were) drawers of crap. The whole clean up accounted for one dustbin bag full of crap.

As, I opened the third drawer down yesterday evening, I found something, or should I say, somethings, that I have not required for a long time and consequently forgotten were in existence despite them coming in a range of sizes and brands occupying the majority of the drawer. It then dawned on me, that I would not require them ever again, and as I thought about what not needing them ever again meant, a teeny tiny tear fell down my face. And then a few more followed.

In this strange remission world, especially in the one where I try and remain positive, I avoid thinking about the things that have changed since I was diagnosed and the things I have lost since I was diagnosed. Sometimes unfortunately, even when you are doing the most practical of things, they just creep up on you, at least they do on me anyway, and when that happens to me, all I can do is give myself a minute or five (ten).

I gave myself five minutes to think that I will never again be caught short when out and have to ask a female friend or worse, a female colleague,
an embarrassing question. I gave myself five minutes to remember what it was like for my body to act like clockwork every 29 days. I gave myself five minutes to curse the hot flushes. And I gave myself five minutes, because all of the above means that I cannot have babies.

I then cursed myeloma.

Once composed, I stared into the drawer some more before I scooped up the contents, which included two half full boxes of the same thing, and put them in my black bag. I then left my room and was told about some of the benefits of not having to stock up in Boots every month.

Other things in the drawers that also contributed to a wee bit of insomnia and yearning for a simpler time last night, included;
β€’ Hair bobbles (I thought I had dispossessed of them all)
β€’ 2 x paddle hair brushes containing long brown hairs, which I felt the need to finger
β€’ Prophylactics
β€’ Old photographs

On the plus side, I was reminded that myeloma has significantly increased the quality my remaining toiletries and thus, I am unlikely to need to purchase any moisturiser any time soon (shower gel and bubble bath on the other hand…).

EJB

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The Good Fight

A wise person once said to me that it would take time to recover after my transplant, both physically and emotionally. The person who said this is far more pragmatic and sensible than I, and added that I may feel different after my stem cells had returned to my body. Clearly, this was a conversation that was had before my transplant. Clearly, she was correct. I do feel different and I am not talking about my back.

A transplant is a transplant is a transplant. Most of the physical side effects can be predicted and there is a desired outcome. The Medically Trained People expect certain things to happen, I know that because they told me roughly what was going to happen at various stages along the way. Repeatedly. In addition to that, I read literature from various charities and collected anecdotes from people whether I wanted them or not. The emotional toll of what was going to happen was rarely discussed.

I was excited about my transplant because it signalled a possible end, but now, in limbo land, I feel empty. I’ve been running so fast for a year, working towards something, and now, I have done everything I need to do, all I have is waiting. It is an ever so subtle difference, that at times, I feel only I get. I remember many months ago, somebody who had a transplant telling me about their post-transplant depression, and I did not understand why they would be depressed. Everybody’s cancer is their own and I understand it now.

I have spent seven weeks beating myself up about this. I am stoic. I have reached this point in my journey with my head mostly held high and my glass half full. I am supposed to be a motivator. I am supposed to smile and let everybody looking at me know I am okay. I should not feel like this. This, by the way, encompasses a lot and with this, I feel like I am stuck on repeat. So, do yourself a favour and stop reading now or grab a tissue. It is uncouth to blow your nose on your top; I am learning that daily.

In the first few days in hospital, when I was still excreting fluids from my bum hole on the hour, I felt like I had lost my ability to reason and to problem solve. Now, with the weeks gone by, I know I have. Simple things feel difficult and by simple, I mean simple. Deciding what to have for dinner is no walk in the park, it is a headache. So imagine how I feel when it came to organising getting a new bed and wardrobe (I haven’t done it) and deciding what day I was going to return to London. Do not even get me started on my financial issues. I feel like Podd.

I have also discovered that my lack of reason, almost always means that I cannot stop myself from blurting out my thoughts and feelings. I do not need to paint a picture of this, for I sound like a whining arse wipe (which makes me feel worse by the way), but I am going to ram it down your throats anyway… If I feel sad, upset or angry, I am going to let it out. All my sense tells me not to, but I cannot stop myself, especially if we are close. As Mamma Jones explained to me yesterday, not everybody is her or Big Sister, and are programmed to take it. Last Sunday, in the middle of my worst breakdown yet, I believe I said that my life might nothing, none of my friends cared about me and I wanted to die, which led Big Sister to tell me to ‘get a grip’. I thought that was mean. That is how I felt in that moment. My response was something along the lines of saying that people do not understand what is going on inside my head. If I were reading this about somebody else, I would tell me to get a grip too. It does not feel up to me. Let us not forget that I am also going through the menopause, albeit real or fake.

Don’t get me wrong, sometimes, I am still a hoot, but my wit seems to be fighting an uphill battle for attention.

My excitement pre transplant, evidently, has diminished, it is not completely gone, I am a fighter after all, but it has gone right down there with my bank balance. Others are excited about the future and I get pep talks about how things will improve. The truth is with the transplant is that sort of talk and expectation, that talk about the improvements to come, anger me now and make me feel frustrated. Especially when the pom-poms are coming from secondary experience. Personally, I can barely think, let alone talk about what is going to happen to me in October, November, December, or how much I want to get back to normal, or what getting back to normal means to me, without crying. I cannot finish those sentences. That is no exaggeration.

On a number of occasions since I came out of hospital, people have asked me those very questions (what happens next, what are you planning, do you know when you will return to work, blah, blah, spew) and told me what I have to look forward to and every time, unless it is me instigating it, I feel like somebody has stabbed me in the stomach and then stuck their thumb in the wound they created. The thumb makes me cry. My voice breaks, and I have to use all my might to suck the tears back up again. In the last year, I have become very good at this, sucking the tears back up again, but in my world post transplant, it is much, much harder to do. The tears just come or I sound like a man. On one particular occasion, I was on the phone to a senior work person, but fortunately, the senior work person was oblivious to what was going on on the other end of the phone. Sometimes, there are reasons to be thankful for the temperamental mobile phone coverage in the fens. It was my favourite instance, because I would never, ever allow somebody of their kind, to witness that type of weakness.

The future everybody talks about so eagerly, scares me. I do not want to upset them. On the few times I have felt strong enough to let that excitement in, I plan in my head. I plan meals, cinema, theatre and holidays and I come across other hurdles and disappointment. I am not clear if they are actual hurdles, but my lack of reason makes mountains out of molehills. It is a prison. When my post transplant world comes, when I am in it because right now is not the world I envisaged, I want trumpets, bunting and kept promises. Right now, I just want support, understanding and reassurance.

I know that my up current struggles are not helped by my isolation. Since I was discharged from hospital, prior to Sunday afternoon when I attended a two year old’s birthday party, I had conversations in person or on the phone with just twelve adults, about half of these were not myeloma related. It would be fair to say that whilst I was in hospital, much of my conversations we also myeloma related, nearly all of them in fact. My transplant seems to have defined me more than my other treatment to date. I am more than my transplant and My Myeloma, and I deserve to be spoken to as such, otherwise, I end up having the same conversation again and again, just with different people. In terms of contact, what I mean is text message. Rightly or wrongly, I feel let down.

Based on all this, in terms of the effect on me, all I can say is, do the maths. It’s Key Stage 3 sort of stuff. If you cannot do the maths, see the bite size example below:

Isolation + boredom = insecurity + paranoia = tears + sadness

β˜”β˜”β˜”β˜”β˜”β˜”β˜”β˜”β˜”β˜”β˜”

I am not embellishing anything or seeking your pity. I want understanding. The thoughts I mention really have gone around and around my head and I have been taking this trip for weeks. Not every day mind, I do get the occasional rest day. In the last three weeks I have made several attempts to write this blog. I have questioned what has happened to me, what is happening to me and my future. I have played out the various scenarios in my head. I have been up and I have been down. There is however, only one time I have been absolutely certain. Somebody, who was recently diagnosed with the wonder that is myeloma commented on my blog and said they did not think they would take the medication to treat not cure it. The comments saddened me, but they also made me realise something about me, that in spite of everything I have said above and all the other side effects, I would never not fight this. Even if I am have no money, my support network get sick of me, I cannot shift the weight and I remain bald forever, I would continue fighting. The realisation was a relief, because on the dark times, I thought I had lost sight of it.

This period, is just part of the battle after all?

Anyway, I can still laugh at farts and stuff so I am bound to be okay.

EJB x

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