Tag Archives: SCT

My Finest Hour

Forgive me. Seriously, in the words of Bryan Adams ‘please forgive me, I know not what I do’. Every time somebody has asked me recently if I was done with my blog, it strengthened my resolve to complete a blog.  I am far from finished with the blog; that was clear. What was not clear, was how I was going to rip off the gargantuan plaster covering my keyboard and get my thoughts to screen after such a long break and such a massive development. I know I have been neglecting this blog, but do not think I have not been thinking about it. Every other day I look at the WordPress app on my phone, a reminder of my world and I challenge myself to finish a blog that day. Clearly that failed. I get distracted. I probably had to wash and focus on my fluid intake. I am all so easily distracted. 

Where was I? Yes, the story I am eventually going to to tell is far from being hot of the press. In terms of speed, if I were a missionary in Africa in at the start of WW1 writing home to tell my family I had fallen in love with Humphrey Bogart, the news of said union would probably have found its way to my family long before I could find the words to explain the last few months of my life. 

In my defence and I have a big one, the last few months have been an exhausting and confusing blur. Contrary to what it may look like, I have very limited free time. My main priority has had to be me working out how I feel and how I want to hold myself, which is closely followed by doing daily tasks like washing, eating and forming sentences. No mean feat, all things considered. 

To produce something, something not soaked in self pity and embarrassment, it was impossible for me to immediately put all of this in my blog. Please don’t misinterpret me, I have a lot of words in my arsenal, I just do not seem to have the capacity to put them into any form of working order with a hint of wit. My Myeloma has dumbed me down. I have had a strong  will to write it, but at each start attempt, if I managed to get any  further then the first sentence by inner monologue would start  singing a tune of my own creation called “Blah” or I would want to play at Candy Crush and think of nothing. The words would the be lost and more often than not, I then fell asleep. I would then wake, I may be sick and then the cycle starts all over again. It’s an invisible pressure that only I see. I am all too  aware that I will get a crispy clear clarity once my words are published out in the Internet ether, but it’s just being able to get in there…

So yes, your forgiveness is something I ask for. I now recommend that you buckle in tight for this is going to be a long one, for this, all of this, has been anything but my finest hour. 

My last blog post was a boast, it was not even my boast, it was a boast made by a Medically Trained Person. My life was on track, I’m not sure what track but I was moving in a direction with less drugs, regular stools and finances. I had trepidatiously allowed myself to think more than a month a head. I was moving in a direction that excited me, secretly hoping for and  releasing my grip on the thought that My Myeloma was never far away…

As it turns out, I was not far away. Some time after the ‘sweet spot’ comment, I went to St Bart’s for a clinic appointment that I thought nothing of other than my attendance was a requirement. I had become comfortable and my guard was down. Imagine my horror then, when after a lengthy silence and grimaces of concern, the Medicaly Trained Person told me that after months and months of nothing, I had a paraprotein of 4. I don’t really remember what happened after that. I know we discussed scenarios and she tried to but a positive spin on it, but I knew there was only one direction for this development and it was not an error on the test. I had felt it in my bones for weeks but I had been reassured that my new pain was nothing to worry about.

In that morning, I did not cry. I stopped talking. I had one desire after that appointment and one desire only, and that was to get home. Unfortunately, I had to queue for an eternity at phlebotomy and then at the pharmacy before I  was allowed to go home. By the pharmacy, my tears were involuntarily coming and it remained that way for several hours. By the time I had walked in my front door and tried to get the words out to Housemate, I was on the floor. The guard was truly down.

All the fear I had about this being the worst relapse I would ever have, the relapse after the hit and hope of allograft, came out of me that late afternoon on my hallway floor and then in my lounge  and I have been dealing with fact ever since. 

It’s Failure. I feel like it is one big failure. I need to be absolutely clear on this point, the fault is not my donor’s, My Big Sistee’s. She did everything she should have done and more, my body just failed me.I feel like I failed her and everybody else who was hoping for a happier ending for me. I even feel like I failed the people not wishing me well. Trust me when j say that this is not hyperbole; I  was and remain devasted. 

The weeks that followed were bad. I had slipped deep into a black hole. It was the deepest, darkest pit of a black hole that I tried to keep to myself. I was so embarrassed by this happening once again, dominating lives once again,  that bar a handful of people, I kept all developments to myself. As well as worrying about losing my life, I feared this would be a development that would lead me to losing people. I have to be in bed by 09.00pm for goodness sake and I cancel my plans all the time. 

I had to wait for what felt like weeks, but really it was only a matter of days, to find out how bad it all was. I fixed my thoughts on it spreading, questioning why my pain had increased so dramatically, so quickly, self diagnosing secondary cancers with aplomb, and then plotted what the next steps would be, all without talking to a Medically Trained Person. The 2016 I had envisaged for myself was quickly slipping away from my grasp. 

For the first time since all this started over four years ago, I asked myself whether it was all worth it. I questioned whether I wanted any treatment at all. I didn’t know what my treatment would be. As far as I was concerened, in my darkest thoughts, I was on a one way track to palliative care. To add just that extra bit of sweet icing to the cake, I was also managing a fast deterioration of my bones. The pain was constant and restrictive;  and  included no bending, assistance required getting out of bed and off the toilet and no picnics to name but a few. I still worry about travelling long distances along in case I get too tired. I have once again lost my independence and I didn’t feel like I could share it with anybody. It was too sad.

I couldn’t talk to anybody about this. Perhaps the scariest thing of all were my thoughts about how I would die both naturally and unnaturally, as I tried to decide which option would be best. In those never ending says, all I could see for my life  was the at some point soon, not too far away it would end. Perhaps you can understand why I did not want to blog about this. Counselling, lots of counselling had to come first. 

I have always been realistic when it comes to my treatment, but I dropped my guard when I heard the sweet words of the ‘sweet spot’. There is no way of knowing if I would have handled it all better if I had been better prepared. If, during bouts of down time, I had not allowed myself to day dream about usual 32 year old stuff, maybe not the babies for I am a realist, but I would dream about independence, love (I’m talk under-the-covers-kind) and just living. I thought and planned for a life where I was not just going through the motions of my drug regimen. 

I could not then and still can I not see how I can reconcile this with relapsing. All my peers are moving in one direction, their direction whilst I feel like a am treading water until the day I am told that the Medically Trained People can do no more. There are times when I feel I am  the saddest, poorest spinster, adult child that there ever has been. I know that the more drugs I take the harder it will be to keep hold of my former self. There will be more staring into space as I try to follow a conversation and more Friday night’s out longing for my bed by 7.30pm, afraid to tell my friends that I am struggling to hear what they are saying.

All the time I was fighting the peak of battle in my head, I was being poked and prodded and then waiting for the Medical Trained People to give me the low down. To be precise, give Mamma Jones or Housemate the lowdown; I was in no fit state to hear it myself. There was too much waiting. I was in what can only politely be described as a heightened sense of anxiety. Looking back, it is a wonder I held it together as well as I did. Potentially, I thought that each test would show  that I was on a priority boarding ticket to the kicked bucket, but alas, that was not the case. My biopsy result did not have any active cancel cells in it, which even my brain worked out was better news than cancer being present. My scan did show new disease in my pelvis, both hips, both arms, both shoulder blades my ribs and in my cervical spine, but as far as I know, there was nothing requiring urgent attention. I have been told to be very careful, which means no lifting, very limited walking and no picnics. I could add more to the list, but I conscious of my word count. Just imagine an even bigger loss of independence.

I mean no disrespect when I say that the only  good thing to come from all of this is my transfer back to UCLH. The reason for the transfer is related to drug funding. One should never underestimate the benefit of being able to email a Medically Trained Person and have them respond to you and make you feel worthwhile. I feel safe at UCLH. I emailed the team at UCLH to inform them of my relapse and do you know how long it was before they had phoned me to see if I was coping? 15 minutes. That makes all the difference to me (KEEP OUR NHS ❤️!).

We now quickly and smoothly enter the next phase in my treatment. I like to call it the brain altering, stomach churning, sick phase or to put it more simply, The Drug Phrase. I have limited say on my treatment and I am happy with this. I trust my Doctors to prescribe me the right course of treatment. That is not to say that they have not been  without their teething problems. Did I mention a propensity to vomit? 

I am currently on a course of oral chemotherapy supported by a four weekly dose of Zometa for my bones. I am on a daily tablet of Revlimid, a weekly tablet called Ixazomib, which is basically an oral form of the Cilit Bang I was on in 2013-14, all washed down a healthy dose of Dexamethasone or steroids to you and me. I had increased my MST to 120mg twice a day to manage the pain, but became so constipated, I could not eat and the side effects became worse than the pain itself. Got it? With my supporting meds included, I am currently on between 24-40 pills a day. My first cycle was intolerable. I got into bed on a Monday and walked out of it a fortnight later and 8kg lighter. The following cycle was easier to bear, but nothing can remove fatigue as the unpredictable ruler of my life.

For the unitiated reader, the fatigue I have with chemotherapy goes far and beyond me feeling a little tired. At it’s worst, I cannot move, I cannot sleep or I oversleep, I fall asleep with the cooker on, showering takes two hours due to rests breaks and I have no capacity for a challenge. A slight problem to you, is a huge, gigantic issue for me. I once earned a fairly respectable BA and last week, I spent at least 10 hours fretting about how I would zip up a dress in a hotel. As a consequence I increasingly find myself going from docile to dogged in a matter of seconds. My fatigue gives me anywhere from 30 minutes to four hours of ‘good hours a day before I have to crawl back on my bed or the sofa. The beautiful part is that I cannot predict when or where it is going to hit.

I could go on and on about my recent experiences and do not worry, I will. I have now brown the seal. I already have a fairly detailed analysis of my bowel movement coming your way soon. For now however, I will end this blog. 

I will however say this, the day I started my treatment, the first day I took my new regimen I had no doubt in my head that I was going the right thing.  There was no doubt. I felt empowered. If I have taken one thing away this last four years it is that my illness is not just about me. I do not know what the future holds, but I know that I am not yet ready to let things happen without me. There will be days when I will doubt this, the feelings of ‘woe is me’ are inevitable and healthy. For me, right now, I am glad I was just given had the opportunity to regurgitate last night’s dinner. I am glad that I am likely to spend all day in bed feeling like I have been hit over the head with a sack of potatoes. I’m not glad about all of this because nothing remotely fun is going to happen with my day. I am glad because at some point in my near future, I will be able to do something worthwhile and right now, that is the only thing I can ask for.

EJB x

P.S. For all those myeloma sufferers out there; this works for me. This is my story. Please do not feel like I am telling you how to behave and do. You follow your path.

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18 is a Magic Number

Just over four weeks ago, on a Wednesday evening, I sat on my sofa brimming with excitement. I really do mean brimming. My cup was running well and truly over. There was so much excitement in my belly that I felt almost giddy. In me, giddiness general manifests in mumbling to myself and occasionally rubbing my hands together like I have just hatched a masterful plan. The cause of my excitement was not because it was the evening of the Great British Bake Off final and Housemate and I had settled in for a night with a takeaway, although that sort of thing does stir my loins these days. No, my excitement was due to the fact it was the eve of my annual film marathon. It was the eve of the London Film Festival. I wrote a very similar blog last year, and the year before that, so you could just re-read those instead of reading on. 

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Still here? Grand. 

This year, unlike two years ago when I was also post transplant, there was no question in my head of me not partaking in what is a film lover’s paradise. I may have had two transplants this year, but going into that treatment, I simply told myself that by October, I would have to be ready to see one, maybe two films a day for eleven consecutive days. I did have to give consideration to my stamina, so I had long concluded that if, at the time of booking, I thought I might struggle, I would give myself a day or two off during the eleven days. But, essentially, by hook or by crook, I knew that I had to get my bum down to Leicester Square, at least ten times. My mental health depended on it.

To those with able bodies, this might not seem like that much of a challenge. Mamma Jones tells me that it is, but she’s my Mum and she has to say things like that to buoy my ego. It is now 17 days after the festival finished, and I can confirm that it was definitely a challenge for both my body and my mind. Put it this way, I no longer think I am just in recovery from an allogrnic transplant.

Prior to the booking lines opening in mid September, I set myself a realistic limit of 12 films. In reaching this calculation, I factored in how much activity I had been doing, how many films I saw the previous year (20), financial considerations and the overall weaknesses of my body that I endure daily. When the booking lines opened, I disregarded all of that and  booked myself in for 18 screenings to start on 9 October and finish on the 19 October. My response to this momentary lapse in control was ‘whoops’. The Bank of Mum was the official sponsor of my film festival, providing financial support as well as daily cheerleading throughout the process.   Inevitably, as I sat on the sofa waiting for the GBBO to start, I booked in another screening, bringing my grand total up to 19 screenings, because my giddiness had made me feel ever so slightly invincible.

To many people, including myself, there is a little bit of the ridiculous about how I approach the film festival. I got carried away. I really, did. The London Film Festival no longer simply represents an annual period of cultural indulgence. It’s become how I prove to myself that my will still has some say in how I conduct myself and spend my time. That is an important thing to remember every day, but LFF is a handy reminder that even if my grip is weak, I must still cling on to the things that make me, Me. I am not just a Myeloma and chemotherapy riddled vessel, despite the occasional propensity for me to think this.  

To me, and I think it is evident to my nearest and dearest, it is imperative that this part of my life does not stop. My brain couldn’t take another loss. What I get from throwing myself into multiple dark rooms, not talking to strangers over x amount of day lasts way beyond the days I am doing it. I’d had two years of testing the theory.

No pressure then.

🎬🎬🎬

In the months prior to the EJ Bones Film Festival launch date of 9 October, I had managed to get on a bus four maybe five times since Transplant Number 2 and not once had the trip been longer than 20 minutes.  I had probably been out of the flat or Mamma Jones’ house for at most, five hours at a time, and the majority of that was probably hospital related. If I did for some inexplicable reason find that I had exerted myself for more than say four hours, I would then need to spend the entire next day relaxing. I also required a good 10-12 hours sleep a day in order to function.

  
19 screenings over 11 days did not give me much leeway for any ‘Bad Days’ and I get by on being able to have a Bad Day. Although I did get carried away with my bookings, I had created a schedule that would use the least amount of energy. If I was seeing more than one film a day, they had to be back to back, so that I did not have to do the 100 minutes round trip into the West End more than once a day. Bar two nights, I ensured I was home by 20:00hrs so I did not not interrupt my drug and sleep routines. I had only booked myself aisle seats to allow my butt more space to wriggle. Any socialising outside of the festival was strictly prohibited. In essence, I had accounted for my every minute during the festival in advance of it. I even planned my meals. It made me extremely anti social. Beyond that, I had blanked out the week after it to recoup, which only added to my misanthropic behaviour. Those 11 days in the middle of October, were my days and I put my hands up and admit that I approached it all with only myself in mind, knowing that it would make me feel better. In fact, to me, it was medicinal. A theory backed up by more than one Medically  Trained  Person. 

To put my energy usage into some sort of perspective, a few days before I found myself struggling to contain my excitement on my sofa, I asked a Medically Trained Person if I should still be limiting myself to the 5-25 minutes of activity a day. I was told that if I could do more, I should do more (but not too much), but at that stage they do not expect people to be able to do  much more than 25 minutes.

I think I have hammered home the point that my plans were ambitious.  

Did I do it?

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Of course I did. 

  
I missed the last screening. So, my film festival finished on the 18th with 18 screening and. I do not consider this a failure. Firstly, I got a refund on the ticket I did not use (ever the bonus). Secondly, I had seen 18 screenings in 10 days and by the evening of of the penultimate day, I was nearly catatonic. Sometimes, pride should be taken in knowing when enough is enough. Given the fact that I could no longer follow a five minute conversation, I knew that a two hour long Chinese musical starting 15 minutes after my usual bedtime was out of the question. If I had gone, I would have only done so, so I could tell you that I had seen 19 screenings and not the 18. 18 was enough. 18 was the magic number that is going to carry me through the next however many, long and dark months of the Unknown.

It was so hard. I thoroughly enjoyed myself, but my will and my body well and truly battled it out. Housemate lived with a zombie for the duration. Some mornings I had to contend with vomit or a similar issue from another orifice. The experience not only highlighted the level of my fatigue othe limitations of my morning drug regime; it reminded me that I have ‘problems’ with my back. Believe it or not, I forget about my back. I suppose 100mg of slow release morphine a day can do that. The same can also be said for spending nearly three months predominantly on my back.  The bus journey and sitting in a cinema seat quickly brought me back to a face squinting reality. 

In getting the bus and being around the general public, I was also reminded that the outside world is a hard place to exist in. It’s not considered acceptable to lie down when you are out, for a start, there are no beds. One of the cinemas had a footstool and I thought I had walked into paradise. Body issues aside, I suddenly and frequently had to factor in that there are the people who are oblivious when it comes to my disability. Mind you, my disability is invisible, so I can only allow myself to be marginally bitter about this. Leicester Square at midnight on a Friday could only be described as a Danger Zone for somebody used to the quiet of their flat. Many days I struggled to get a seat on the bus. There were many days I struggled to walk to the bus. Then there was the one day, when I was sitting in my seat ready to see the latest Studio Ghibli, when a woman on her way to her seat told me that standing up to let her through would give me some much needed exercise. Needless to say, I took her life apart with a disapproving glare. I just told this story to my favourite Medically Trained People, and they responded ‘if only she knew’. Indeed.

In the days that has turned into weeks following the conclusion of the festival, I have been extremely tired and my brain has been in quite a muddle. I started this blog on the 10th October. I feel like all my energy has been frustratingly zapped from my body, but I know that this is just an illusion of my own making. Of course I am tired and I do think some of this is caused by me running before I could walk.  25 minutes, remember the advisory 25 minutes. I went from doing a little every other day to being out and engaged for at least five hours a day for just under a fortnight.  On one of those magical days, I was out for over 12 hours. For those 12 hours, I pretended I was normal. 

During a few moments of existential despair, I have  questioned if I took on too much, whether 18 was too much and whether instead of  giving me hope, it has set me, physically at least, back. A physical setback quickly becomes a mental one too. With the help of my occasional  friend Reason, I realised that I was being missing one crucial detail… I am now doing more, and the consequence of doing more, is feeling tired and being more aware of the very real need for my bed. 

The EJ Bones’ Film Festival could never set me back. It’s spurred me on. The giddiness I felt on my sofa was not met with an anticlimax.

I would not be capable of replicating those 11 days again today. I probably would not be able to replicate it again in a fortnight. The key point for me to remember is that I did it once. And, if I could do it once, less than 100 days after my allograft, what the hell am I going to be able to achieve in 18, 50 or 100 days from now? More importantly, how many am I going to be able to see next October? The answer isn’t endless, but I know it is bigger and that is something to cling on to.
I am glad I set myself such a busy challenge, which means I am even happier that I was able to do what I needed to do. My will won out. I won that battle. Now, I just need to find a new one.

EJB x

🎬🎬🎬

For those of you who are interested, I saw the following:

1/ Grandma (USA)

2/ The Club (Chile)

3/ The Daughter (Austrailia) 

4/ The Measure of a Man (France)

5/ When Marnie Was There (Japan)

6/ Son of Saul (Hungary)

7/ Room (Canada/Ireland)

8/ 11 Minutes (Poland)

9/ The Assassin (Taiwan/China)

10/ Evolution (France)

11/ Chronic (USA)

12/ Carol (USA)

13/ Desirito (Mexico/USA)

14/ Cowboys (France)

15/ Dheephan (France)

16/ Anormalisa (USA)

17 & 18/ A selection of short films

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Bon Anniversaire

Today marks three years since Myeloma officially came into my life. It’s three years since that junior doctor cried as she sat at the foot of my bed whilst she broke the bad news to my family and me. Is it an anniversary worth celebrating? No. It is however a significant milestone in my life and one which marked for better and mostly worse, a permanent change in the life of Miss Emma Jane Jones. Put it another way, the 17 August 2012 was life changing. And it wasn’t only life changing for me.

Since that date, I have been given a whole set of new dates to remember, celebrate and dwell. My first transplant on the 17 July 2013 for example, but that failed, so it was not quite the rebirth I advocated at the time. Then there was my second auto on 1 April 2015 and then my Allo on 23 July 2015. Only time will tell if the latter dates are ones worthy of celebration or just dates of mild significance. Mind you, the date my DNA changed will always be fairly significant won’t it?

For me though, this anniversary is the Big One. It’s the one that started everything off and although I wasn’t given the formal diagnosis until three days later, the 17 August will always be the day I got myeloma. The day I got myeloma. A ridiculous notion really, because my vertebrae did not fracture on that date, and the paraprotein did not suddenly appear in my blood on the 17 August three years ago. It is the date I knew why these things were changing in my body. It is much like my birthday, except with far more adolescent longing. On this date, I can feel melancholy and I can feel slightly sorry for myself than usual. I can, if that way inclined, try and recall the best and the worst of my three years, the highs and lows of each of 1095 days, I have fought through. And it is a fight, people may be trying to soften the vocabulary, but for me, I see this as a fight, a really, really big one.

Of course, you can see and feel the date differently, which I occasionally do. For as sad as my diagnosis was and as much as I do not want to have myeloma, the 17 August is also the anniversary of me growing up. My Myeloma has forced me to do many things I have not wished to do and experience,  but it also forced me to become an adult. Not the adult I once envisaged with a mortgage, children and a shed; the sort I am jealous of now. I am an adult who is forced to sponge of the State and her parents, but I became an adult nevertheless. I look at my contemporaries and sometimes I think to myself, ‘how would you have managed it?’ It’s a question without an answer, and it is a question I would not wish upon anybody ever having to find the answer to. I do not like myself for thinking it, but even when I think about that question in relation to me, I question how I have managed it all, and I am proud of myself. Even at the moment, when I seem to question daily my strength to continue with my allo treatment, I am proud of myself for coping. I think us myeloma sufferers deserve far more kudos for merely coping. I bet you any amount of money, because I do not have any money to make any sort of meaningful bet, that three years ago, I would have thrown anybody out of my cubicle if they dared to say that the 17 August would be a date that I would eventually be proud of. 

Even though my pride only accounts for some of my feeling towards this day. My diagnosis was the making of me. 

It was indeed a Big Day. 

I could do what I have done in previous years and list all the treatment I have endured in such a short amount of time. I could go through the physical side effects I have experienced many times over and have been forced to become accustomed to. I could even talk about how long I statistically have left in this world,  but I will not be doing any of that today.  This year feels different to me. Maybe it is because I am no longer at UCH and things seem temporary at St Bart’s. Though, really My Myeloma feels more than just the facts and the figures. Since my last anniversary, I feel like so much has changed; I do not know if it is a tangible change or just a non-drug related feeling in my gut.

Perhaps, prior to this last year, when I embarked on a nine month treatment programme followed by two SCT, I believed nothing had really permanently changed. I mean, I knew things had changed, but there was a part of me that still believed that my life could at some point at an unknown time and date, just slot back until place. I know that will not happen now. My 13 months of near constant treatment shown me that.

Until this last year, I also believed that I had a well established Support Network in place. I believed that all the perceived letting down I had experienced in that first year, was the only letting down I was going to experience in My Myeloma journey. My relapse last June corrected that misunderstanding. I feel far more let down post relapse than during any other time during my illness. Make a leaflet about that Myeloma UK, some people, those without myeloma, just cannot handle the fact that myeloma is a cancer that is chronic. That it goes on forever.

It is a strange thing to say, when I feel so well supported and loved now, but I have had to grieve the fact that some people got bored of my cancer and thus they got bored of me. It felt like they had tasted and enjoyed the 11 months of freedom remission had given me, and thought that taking it all on again with another relapse was too difficult a task to take. My stock went down. There were some people who made promises of support and friendship, not always actual promises you understand, but their presence alone throughout the early days of my illness, made me naïve enough to believe there was  something special and enduring in place. A promise of friendship. All I would say of this to anybody else in the same position as me, is, be warned of the glory seeker. When I am stuck in no man’s land, where there is no guaranteed end in sight, and the cancer keeps coming back along with my unpredictable fatigue, and those around me are moving on because they can, people and their promises can disappear. I have seen many of those promises, accompanied by those friendships end up on the proverbial scrap heap. 

It’s made for a difficult year and one where I have had to learn to stand on my own two feet. Fortunately, there is a flip side to this and if my relapse had taught me anything, it was who I could trust to stand side by side with me, as my treatment and their lives continue to develop. It does not always have to be either or, even though I am still prone to bouts of paranoia on this subject. Let’s not kid ourselves, I’m only physically well rounded. 

My relapse showed me that early on in my treatment, I made mistakes. I criticised my friends’ behaviour, in some cases I did so publicly and I regret that now. They were struggling like I was and they showed their struggle differently to how how presented mine. In the last few months, I have seen so much evidence of the support I have during my transplants, that I feel confident that even on my lowest days, I’ll have at least one person willing to pull me through the darkness. We just need to work on how I let people know. 

As it currently all stands, I know that My Support Network is well founded and passionate. It is mine, it is invaluable and I know that it is built on trust, even though I do not get to see its members as much as I would like to and I am pretty certain that is a feeling that works both ways. Rather strangely, or should that be tellingly, My Support Network is made up of people I have known for years either because they are related to me (obviously) or because they have had the good fortune of being my friend long before I knew what myeloma was. It has taken a while and the occasional misunderstanding, but I know who will be there when I need them. Some people will need to be asked for help and others won’t, but that is just the way things have always been and thus, it is the way things should be. I just wish there was more I could personally do to make my friendships equal again. Homemade cards only get me so far. 

Anyway, on the subject of my Support Network, I am making myself blush and as you are not all on anti sickness pills like me, I will put an end to the subject soon, I promise.  I could have just said what I am about to say five paragraphs ago;  My Support Network is irreplaceable. It may be irreplaceable, but crucially, my personal strength and journey through My Myeloma should not be defined and determined by it, and post relapse, when the droppings happened liked flies, I had to accept this the hard way and quickly.

My ability to cope with myeloma, is a much broader achievement than my Support Network. I personally, will always feel isolated by my illness and I have spent three years learning how to cope with this. I do not have all the answers, but I have more than I did last year, so who knows what I will be saying next year? And the year after that? And the year after that? 

Last night, as I was trying to drift off to sleep, I began to worry that with three years of near-constant treatment, there was a possibility  that soon, I might not have the strength to continue fighting should my current treatment fail. My current treatment, which I am nearly halfway though, is not exactly a walk in the park and trust me when I say, I have many a down day. I am fully aware that I will have more down days over the next x days. I will fail to get out of bed a few more times, find myself physically unrecognisable and cry over missing events with my  friends. I worried so much about my occasional thoughts of giving up, that I envisaged quite a different blog to the one you are currently reading. 

I haven’t only experienced treatment, relapse and drugs in my third year of myeloma. In the last year, somebody dear to me lost his fight against myeloma. He became dearer to me, selfishly, with my own diagnosis three years ago. He was somebody who I never saw being remotely negative about the bastard that is myeloma apart from rebranding Velcade, “Cillit Bang”.  I fear negativity is my default position the minute the going gets remotely tough. His eldest daughter also gave me an invaluable crash course in myeloma and continues to offer me considerable patience. Her Dad did not have a sibling donor and thus could not have an Allo SCT, instead  he had two auto SCTs and several other treatments such is the norm for current myeloma treatment on the NHS. He was given velcade and among many of the things, he suffered from steroid insomnia. He did not know it, but he was My Myeloma rock, and the only other person with myeloma I needed to know. My current treatment is the first treatment I have had that he did not have in some incarnation or another. I remind myself that I  feel poorly because I am lucky enough to have a sibling donor, and last week when I couldn’t get out of bed, I thought about him and his family, (and not because I had just watched The Man With The Golden Gun remembering a holiday we had) and I got out of bed. That’s all I really want to say about that. 

Three years after my diagnosis, in the middle of a transplant where I had to sign to say I was aware of all the risks that could happen during it, I am ever aware of my life and the chance of my death. I am also ever aware of the chance of my death being further away than the statistics that I will not talk about, and current literature would suggest. 

It’s been three years of changing and developing treatments and a changing and developing me. I don’t know how to end my acknowledgement of my anniversary, so I am just going to say goodbye and thank you for reading my blogs. I promise they will continue.

EJB x 

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N.B.

On the days when I feel like there is an improvement in my mental capability, I remember that my mobile phone device is full of  blogging material of questionable quality. It’s a responsibility, for I then feel tied down to telling what a lesser person would deem an uninteresting story, whilst simultaneously knowing that I personally, will feel instantly better for sharing and recording, in a way that can never be taken back, whatever the particular shit myeloma has thrown at me during x amount of time between blogs. 

As the earth has continued to rotate, I gave at least managed to hide the evidence of what could form a blog in my iCloud account instead. I guess today is one such day, I have some sort of energy, except, I started writing this blog about ten hours ago and so far, it looks absolutely nothing like I anticipated it would when I started morning. I am fairly certain for example what this will be the only time I mention NHS meals.

Of late, My Myeloma stories are overflowing in my virtual world and my actual mind, and not on my blog. Few people know just how many days I have spent sleeping in a room occupied by strangers or how many times I have been put to bed. There are times I am so confused by it all, that the easiest thing to do to manage it, is to fall asleep and forget it ever happened. I am not even sure what my reality is 100% of the time. I would have no clue at all if I didn’t attempt at least to try to maintain a record. I need a record of this. I want a record of the times I fell asleep mid sentence, or when I canceled plans with my friends and I cried myself to sleep because I saw no end in sight. Hell, I even want a record of my most recent and nightly nightmares. 

Right now, I’m experiencing something new almost daily, and yet I’m not fully documenting it, as I had once documented before, because the something belonging to my sister that entered my body three weeks ago or so (see I do not even know the day) seems to be killing off all my two autos later, surviving, brain cells. 

I have had four weeks of treatment,and of course we are running very close to a certain three year anniversary, so there are no shortages of tales to tell.  I want to tell them but it’s getting close to medication time.

Almost everything I have experienced since my allo commenced is ‘blog newsworthy’ (people write blogs about Stephanie Meyer’s arm hair right?), I just haven’t quite worked out where the energy is to tell you about it. Know I plan to, it might just come later than I actually experienced it.

I used to think that a late blog would be something of a disservice. If a blog was written out of anger for example, like the half written one I found the other morning, time gives me the ability to calm down, to compose myself, and omit the need to rebuild any of those metaphorical bridges that might have been damaged mid rant. On the downside, by waiting, it takes away that raw emotion, the raw emotion heightened by my inability to eat raw foods, and I feel a little bit like I am making things sound easier than they are. I feel like it makes me sound more composed than I am, when I am really not. Not only that, less blogs I dramatically reduces my site’s statistics and my ego likes the notifications. 

If there is one thing I have experienced a lot of since I started frequenting St Bartholomew’s Hospital everyday, it is raw uncensored emotion. Perhaps the fact I am too tired to blog is stopping me from writing something I would regret at a later date. It’s not a lie, it’s just presented a different way. That is what I keep telling myself when I look at my ever growing list of half finished drafts.

I cannot give you any specific examples, for that would really negate the need of this temporary notate bene. Hypothetically, however, I might have written something negative, something along the lines of;

There is still time to jinx this procedure by talking about it now and I most definitely, most adamantly, most whole-life-depends-on-it-do-not-want-to-jinx-this. But and that is a start a sentence with a capital ‘B, But, I do not like Saint Bartholomew’s Hospital. 

And then the hypothetical thought better of it… Like I said, I did not write that down, those thoughts are imagined. If somebody did hypothetically wake up one morning and write that down before they even got up to go to the toilet, I am sure they had good reason for doing so and it wasn’t because she felt the nursing assistance was slightly rude that morning… Hypothetically. Similarly, so too, could something like this have been said, despite me never actually joining any of these words together to make a cohesive sentence;

Every time I have experienced Red Thumping Rage over the last 17 days, I have felt like a teenage brat in great need of a reality check, a slap round the face, a smidgen of gratitude and a slow play replay of the NHS part of the 2012 Olympics opening ceremony.

I could even have imagined images of clutter or me sleeping. Maybe, like I said. I do not know. The negative portrayal of a scientific marvel does not sound like me. 

  
  

I love everything remember? I think my care is great. I love talking about myeloma and myself, and I cannot wait for the time when I have the effort to do it properly, with a proofread. Until that point comes back, we get what we get. 

It’s much like the unpredictable bowel.

EJB x

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Like A Bullet From A Gun

WARNING – 💩THIS BLOG CONTAINS TALK OF FAECES. HARD, SOFT AND SHAPELESS FAECES.💩 SO DON’T READ ON IF YOU HAVE A WEAK DISPOSITION. IF YOU DO READ ON, BE THANKFUL I HAVE NOT MENTIONED MORE.*

One of the biggest challenges I am quickly trying to come to terms with is the change the transplant and it’s drugs are going to have and have already had on my toilet going activities. I have spent nearly three years complaining about the impact my previous treatments had upon my bowel. Nay, it is more than that, I had publicity reconciled myself to that fact that unless something was drastically wrong with my body like a course of radiotherapy through my stomach or a hefty dose of Melphalan, I had a life of overly formed, every other day excretion with constipation ahead of me. I understood that and I knew how to manage it. Maybe I had even come to like it. At least it was predictable. Ghostly. 👻

Since my release from hospital however, I have been forced to discuss the taboo that is poo, to avoid mass panic and hypochondria. My mass panic and hypochondria. I can feel my body changes and I am on high alert for it and this is outwardly, the biggest change thus far. Gone are the instantly satisfying rabbit pallets, and in with what I do not know what. I could not make my way through the consent or any of the transplant literature without coming across the word ‘diarrhoea’, so the sudden change is not unexpected. It’s just unwanted. And so are the new definitions. 

I could go deep into my concerns and summarise the many conversations I have had with the Medically Trained People about why investing in some nappy rash ointment is a good idea, but I think the conversation below sums up my current dilemma.

  
Such is the importance of stools in this post allo world, I have to inform the Medically Trained People if I have more than two sessions in a single day. Manners would usually dictate not discussing this with anybody else, let alone the out of hours hotline. 

On this subject of toilet, I am beyond cautious. You can tell nurses in particular are used to this sort of talk because my nurse on Monday compared the consistency and colour of her breakfast drink to what I need to be on high alert for, whilst she consumed it. Take that Weetabix. I welcomed the clarity. I have sample jars in my handbag, should there be a sudden need for analysis. I am not actually going anywhere requiring a handbag at the moment, so the fact the jars are still in my handbag are a testament to my current energy levels.

Earlier in the week, I came across the notion of ‘constipation overflow’. If you are interested, that is what I have by the way. Constipation overflow. There is no need for the nappy rash ointment just yet.

The sad truth is, despite my panic last week, I haven’t experienced diarrhoea yet. My friend would be correct with his definition of a ‘loose stool’. For me, this is just another unpleasant experience and it is one that realistically is only going to get worse. Another reason why I must remember my fluids!

The diarrhoea will come and come it will and when it does, I’ll put on my rose tinted spectacles and look in my medicine drawer at my Sainsbury’s own brand suppositories with yearning.

What a depressing thought. 

EJB x

* Humans do Number 1s too, and they are not immune from the allo side effects either. FYI

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Catch & Release

It has been seven whole days since I was told that I could go home and indeed, went home, leaving my week stay at St Bart’s but a distant memory. The latter part of that sentence is total bollocks by the way, the schedule of an allogeneic SCT, even if it is just a mini one like mine, makes it next to impossible to pretend that the hospital is just a misty water coloured memory in the corner of my mind. In the seven days I have been home, I have been to St Bart’s twice and in touch with them via phone or email on three other occasions. Essentially, I have been in touch with said hospital every working day since I left it. 

My bloods might be going in the right direction and the medically Trained People are making all the right noises, but did I leave there too soon? How the heck should I know? I spent all of Monday in hospital being tested for bugs and slugs in isolation, because they was a question over my current health.

If you were to speak to me or see me over the last week, you would probably conclude that I did leave too soon.  On Monday, a Medically Trained Person was asking me complex questions like “what was the date of your transplant?” and “what did you do before all of this?”, and I felt like I was taking my French oral GCSE without revision. All I could do was apologise that I could not speak normally. Essentially, you are looking at slow, occasionally drawling slur.

I have had two stem cell transplants before this, they were autos, meaning the cells were my own and the recovery was hard, especially after the first one. All so very hard. Upon discharge after both transplants, I got into a car and went straight back to Mamma Jones’ to be looked after until I felt like I could take a stab at doing it myself. My current treatment regime does not allow for that sort of leisure. It barely allows for sufficient rest.

Upon leaving last Wednesday, I was told that I needed to return on Friday or Saturday and then again on Monday for a Doctor’s appointment, leaving little time to make the four and a half hour round trip journey back to the Fens. And so, I decided that I would stay in my flat, with Housemate to help me until after the appointment on the Monday. There are many things one could say about this decision, but for today at least, as I continue to struggle to find my words, let’s just say it was decision most ‘foolish’. 

I am incapable of looking after myself. I imagine that is a fairly difficult statement for any 32 year old to say, accept I am 31 (the proofread) so I will say it again because I know it is hard for me to say; I am incapable of looking after myself. I am also incapable of planning anything, following a plot of any kind, having a prolonged sleep without experiencing a nightmare and not missing my friends.

I knew these facts last Friday, when with my bags still packed from the hospital sitting in my hallway , I phoned Manma Jones crying because my hair had started to fall out and I needed an hour’s lie down post shower, pre dressing in order to make myself presentable for blood tests. An hour after that I spoke to Big Sister and three hours after that she was at my front door ready to drive me back to the house of Mum Love. That night,  100 miles later, my mother needed to help me into my pyjamas. I then spent almost 23 hours of the next day sleeping. I did something quite similar yesterday, although yesterday, I only ate when food was presented to me at 18:10hrs. The previous day, after nine hours in the hospital, I realised that I had forgotten to eat anything at all. 

In hindsight, thinking that I could look after myself straight after receiving seven days of round the clock care, was just bonkers. Of course I have a Support Network in London led by Housemate and Bruce, but one of them is not anatomically capable of putting me in my pyjamas and the other one would be mentally scarred by the concept. Essentially, London assistance isn’t the same as the one I get with Mummy. The people of London have no reason to stand by me when I scream and shout and let it all out, and if I were being perfectly  honest, I will always try my hardest to avoid too many people seeing me at such a low ebb. A location I have been flirting considerably with this last week. 

I am trying not to overthink the situation because I know there is no turning back now and I also know how fortunate I am to be in this position in the first place. I just wonder that if I am finding this transition so difficult now, how the devil am I going to manage when the real thing gets started in a few weeks time? That’s rhetorical.

Some of you may be fortunate enough to have never been an inpatient in a hospital, so let me tell you that whilst in hospital one has little to no privacy even with the privilege of a private room. The NHS, the wonderful and flawed NHS, pays people to create and deliver a care plan, cook and carry  three questionable meals a day, waters you, takes your blood, check your pulse, breathing and blood pressure, prescribe and deliver the correct drugs at the right time and ensures said drugs are swallowed, they change your bedding and clean your room daily and these are just the people you see. Those tubes of bloods and tubs of my urine had to go somewhere, to somebody to check and the results put on to a computer, even if I wish these tests were done with greater haste. My point is, when one is an inpatient, all they have to do is try not to get too irritated by the lack of privacy. Everything else, even if it is not done to a quality one is quite used to, is done for you. One Sunday, for example, the threshold to my room was crossed 47 times in a 24 hour period; 45 times by Medically Employed People and twice by members of my Suppork Network. I do not know for what reason I documented this, but I believe it validates my next point.

  
The minute I walked out of the East Wing last Wednesday afternoon, all the responsibility for doing all of those listed above bar the things done by those unseen technicians handling my bodily fluids,  fell back on to me. It fell on to a me who continues to be nowhere near capable of doing such things alone. I can barely remember to drink, let alone to prepare the food I do not have the energy to eat, and remember to take the 20 odd pills I am prescribed each day at the correct intervals. And then there is cleaning, I attempted to lint roll my pillows today to remove evidence of my shedding hair and Inhad to do it in four separate sessions.

I went into my treatment with my eyes wide open. I knew it was going to be difficult, but I did not think that I would be doubting my ability to see it through so early on. A friend said to me earlier that I had rhino skin, which I sincerely hope is true for no other reason than all this treatment is actually going to make my skin thinner. Not just metaphorically thinner, but old-lady-be-careful-with-the-plaster-thinner. 

I think I just need a few weeks in bed to rebuild, but that is not afforded to me. 

My transfer to St Bart’s seems to symbolise much more than a change in venue for my treatment; everything seems different and all of it seems out of my control. Even though I may allow myself the occasional daydream that this time next year ‘I could be normal’, I am also a realist. I know that what is still to come is going to be so blooming difficult and I’m struggling to see where I am going to find the strength from to achieve my goals. My treatment feels relentless. This is relentless.

Prior to my discharge last Wednesday, I was asked to read an 79 page leaflet from Anthony Nolan called ‘The Seven Steps: The Next Steps’. I knew the contents of it, but I do not know if on the day I was getting to go home after spending a week in a drug fuelled neutropenic haze, I needed to read “it is important to remember that although you are being sent home from hospital, and an important phase of the transplant process is complete, it will be many months before you are fully recovered”. Define ‘many’.

The treatment is intense and I have not had find time to catch my breath. Reading that leaflet seemed to have cast a spell over my whole week. I do not normally feel so negative. That leaflet basically said, don’t relax yet, for the worst is yet to come. 

EJB x 

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Thrushed Out

It breakfast time. A Sunday morning breakfast time no less. I knew this long before somebody physically walked in to my room to to let me know it is breakfast time at all, because of the din they make outside whilst dishing up and not because I have the body clock of somebody permanently located in Beirut and found myself naturally hungry.

Anticipating many people getting round to seeing this later in the day, maybe after they have enjoyed their own Sunday brunches (in my head midday is a far more acceptable time for the first meal on a Sunday than 08:15hrs), can I recommend that you do not view it with or just before food? Consider this a health warning. I do not have the money to be sued. For, on this Sunday morning, I am writing to you about thrush. My very own oral thrush to be precise.

The possibility of something going wrong with one’s gob post chemotherapy is pretty high. So high in fact, there is a reference to it in an episode of Sex and the City and we all know how revered that show once was and therefore it is a fact most accurate, no? None of my three chemotherapies for Transplant Number 2 required ice lollies, but as with all other post IV chemotherapy I have had, as a precaution, I was given mouthwash to use. Crucially and this was my downfall, bar the the First Transplant the Actual First, when I did get some dryness and soreness, giving me the slimiest voice for the radio; I have never experienced the mouth ulcers I understand one can get from their chemotherapy. These mouth ulcers, I understand, are not the cancer equivalent of an unwanted spot by the why, in some cases they can compare with hair loss and are often treated by the morphine. I still find this difficult to be true but it is.

And still, despite knowing what could happen, I became complacent. When I was given the first mouth wash on Day -6, which required mixing two separate salty ointments in a glass,  swooshing the combined fluid around my mouth for 60 seconds and then discard. For four times a day.  I do not know if I suffered some sort of trauma during my childhood, but there is no way I can gurgle anything for more than half a minute in my mouth. When I attempt to do so, my  cheeks feel like they are going to explode and I almost always become so close to gagging that gagging is the reason for me spitting. 

My name is Emma Jane Jones and I am bad at mouthwash. 

Despite my complacency, I thought to myself, make a compromise, do two swooshes a day instead of four. I had enough on my plate. And when I was sick, would that mean I would have to endure it again? I am not sure how many I actually did take but I know there are currently a few boxes of the stuff on my windowsill at home and I have been  showing what as a child I called a ‘Geographical Tongue’ since last Tuesday. Geographical because the fungus grows like a map. God, I used to love showing it off. 

On my transfer from the day ward on Wednesday, it took well over 24 hours to get hold of a mouth wash again, but this time,  I was no longer on salt water. I was on Diffram. Nothing tastes worst than Diffram. Diffram ruins whatever you eat for the rest of your life. I tried to get then to take it back, to revert to the salt water, but I was told it was too late. My mouth had gone too far. Not only am I on the luminous green Diffram four times a day, but I also gave to take four doses of a mouth drop that taste like something you would likely find at the bottom of a certain sort of elderly lady’s handbag. 

It’s all my own doing, however, I know this and I cannot complain.. At the moment it feels like there is a furry film covering my entire mouth, unless I use the Diffram straight after brushing my teeth in which case, it feels like I have salt and wounds and they are becoming one in my mouth. My mouth is surrounded by some dry flaky skin that used to be my lips.

Like I said, I’m not complaining. I should have used all the mouthwash. If I had used it all and result was  the same, I’d be less angry because at least I would know I had done everything I was supposed to. One cannot rewind the clock and if I could, I definitely would not rewind it for this, so I am letting the eight year old me exhibit for a little bit and ask innocently, would you kiss a mouth like this?  

     

A resounding ‘No’? Okay then.

EJB x

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Made Up

Lipstick brings joy to my face. Foundation, a  splash of Touché Éclat, a sheer eyeshadow, a bit of eyeliner, a tot of mascara and little something something on my checks, apparently brings the life to my face.

Making sure I wear lipstick has been a cardinal rule of mine since My Myeloma began. The only times it has been broken, if you exclude the morning run to the shop, has been during periods of hospital admittance, days of the steroid crash and during Transplant Number 1 The Second when I felt it would be inappropriate to whack on some matte lipstick for a 0.2 mile walk.  I’m no Gwen Stefani. At that time, I also stopped wearing make up because I just found it became too cumbersome, when I was only leaving my bed for 30 minutes a day and lifting a blusher brush felt like I was bench pressing whatever is considered a heavy weight to bench press.

I do not know what I envisaged for my appearance during Transplant Number 2.  Comfort would be key of course and the outfit would have to be put together to allow for easy access to my PICC line and the minimal bearing of the arse crack. Next to that, because I knew I would be sitting on a bed for much of the day needing comfort, on a cancer ward, I concluded that wearing a wig would be unnessary. I originally wrote ‘redundant’, but that is very unfair for all those people, who I once was, who  wear their wigs for themselves. As for the rest,  my vanity must not have as much hold of a over me as I once thought it did, because I really did not give my hospital appearance and attire  any thoughts other than the  practical ones I mentioned above.

Well… that was until people started telling me I looked ‘unwell’. Or ‘tired’. Or ‘tired AND unwell’. Or when they avoided all niceties at all and said I look ‘awful’.

Why I wondered? Why in a matter of days had I gone from looking non descript, I had a ‘great’ on 10 July, to an ‘awful’? The answer, I pondered, has something to do make up. I stopped wearing the stuff at some point over the weekend when I forgot what which one was my right hand. In truth, I should have stopped wearing it a few days before that when I dropped the Chanel Blusher in the dog’s bed.

It begs the question, did the chicken come before the egg? Did I look awful when I stopped having the energy to put my make up on, or did I look awful because I did not have the energy to put make up on? Do I look tired because my neutrophils have dropped from 3.3 to <0.1 in a week or do I look tired because I stopped wearing my make up? 

I imagine it is a combination of the two, but I am certain that a man  going through what I am, would not have experienced such a vocal change in perception about his appearance to the extent I did,  just because I happened to stop wearing make up at the same time I started to go downhill. I asked Mamma Jones about this today and she cannot be objective as a mother and just said that I ‘looked like me.’

Two days ago, despite assuring a Medically Trained Person that I felt exactly how I had, for better or for worse, for the previous few days, I was referred to a Senior Medically Trained Person because I looked like I was ‘struggling’. I think this translates to I had some eye bags. Yesterday, a nurse who had not seen me for since Friday told me that I looked ‘worse’. Would I have looked better if my eyes were brightened by mascara? Was it worth me even asking? 

Would I be in my own bed now if my physical appearance hadn’t ‘deteriorated’? I am still eating, drinking and temperature free. Would the need for this current precaution had been less pronounced if I had been able to put a bit of effort into my appearance? 

Is wearing make up as a young female cancer outpatient and looking ‘normal’ an expected pre-requisitite to make the other patients’ and the staff’s day more palatable? I am certainly more comfortable when I can give my face  the time it needs.

Are all the make brands and their advertisers correct? Do women look better with make up on? Do I look better with make up on? I have been financially unable to purchase a daily ointment from MAC since Christmas and my cheekbones have felt positively non-existence since. I am used to be being told that I ‘look good considering’ and there is the frequent surprise of ‘you don’t look ill’. Complements I would not have, if I were to lay my face bare with it’s menopausal skin and hair, blotches and wrinkles.

Has putting the brush down been too much of a shock? Inwardly, over the last week I have felt grey, sunken, like no part of me has any definition whatsoever and I am in dire need of fluids. Was my war paint shielding others from this struggle? No about of make up could beauty up my blood results, nor could it stop me from wanting to sleep in the Day Clinic.  Using the term ‘decision’ loosely, but how much was my decision to stop wearing make up until I felt able to apply it better than my three year old niece the removal of a mask?  And how much of that decision made me look worse than I feel? 

Most importantly, I always considered myself something of a light make up abuser, but given recent comments, just how much have I been wearing? 

💅🏼💋💄

EJB x

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Definitely Not Normal

There is nothing more anticlimactic than the word ‘transplant’ prefixed by the words ‘bone marrow’ or ‘stem cell’. Having experienced two SCT’s before, I knew this time round was not going to start with good looking people wearing scrubs shouting “stat”, whilst sporting my blood all over their latex gloves. My loved ones were not going to be waiting patiently for news in a reception area and it would appear the only soundtrack thus far comes from Julie Andrews. My allogenic transplant has looked nothing if not boring. I am convinced that the optional removal of a bunion would have looked more exciting than what we experienced up to and including on Thursday.

I’m poised for drama, but I do not know what that drama is going to look like yet, or when it is really going to begin, so in the meantime, I will share a few photographs of how Medically Trained People have made the extraordinary, appear somewhat ordinary.
Harvest

   

    
 
Day Zero The First

   

   
   

   

Day Zero The Second

Many people, included I, am surprised by fact that the stem cells are not tested where they are harvested at St Bart’s. Instead, on each Day Zero after Big Sister had been drained and her pins were with needles, her stem cells were couriered to The Royal Free Hospital, some five miles away for testing. They would then travel back by courier, before entering me. It seems a strange world we live in that my sister’s bodily fluids could have visited the magical place known as Whitechapel without their maker being present. 

The cells were taken away in branded picnic bags. On the second day, Big Sister and I showed far too much excitement towards the courier returning our precious goods  when unfortunately for him, he came across the two of us in a lift. We squealed (because it meant I would be home by 20:00hrs) and he looked at us like we were at the wrong hospital. I captured the moment. 

  
Waiting

  

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Drooping

I have literally spent months, maybe even a year willing for something to change in my treatment, so that I had something interesting to blog about. I have a lot that keeps me awake at nights, but I still managed to squeeze in the worry that the monotony of daily cancer care would drive people away. Fast forward to my allograft and I have something new to say almost on the hour. Everything seems like it is new and I am in a state of flux. The problem? Nothing is keeping me awake at night. Very little is keeping me awake in the daytime. My treatment and this experience seems to be moving at such a rate that I do no have the time and I definitely do not have the energy to tell you about it all.

The headline is simple, I have had my transplant. Unlike the original plan, I had not one but two Day Zeros because Big Sister did not produce enough stem cells on the first day. I am far too tired to have body issues at present, which is for the best, because more than one Medically Trained Person told me that the reason for the two day transplant was my sister’s significantly smaller body size.

I just asked Mamma Jones to confirm how many cells I should have had over how many cells I actually had, and I felt like her answer lacked conviction. All you need to know is that I was only marginally short on Day Zero The First, and by close of play on Day Zero The Second, I had had more stem cells than originally intended. 

I now very much want to be a watched pot. I am being monitored so intently, that hopefully, my body will never have the chance to boil… I keep imagining that one day I will wake up and have enough energy to reply to my messages and blog about my experience to do date. If that day doesn’t come, let me tell you that this watching schedule is intense, with absolutely no room for respite. 

Going into this transplant, I was told that it was easy when compared to what I have already experienced over the last three years. I think the word ‘easy’, was a white lie. What I am doing, what I am having to do everyday without a day off is exhausting. Two years ago, I was stuck on a ward on UCH with green coming out every orifice; that was hard. Today, I do not have green coming out every orifice, but it is my 10th day of travelling into Bart’s for blood tests, forgoing rest and questioning the real purpose of showering. On Thursday, utterly dejected, I sat at the foot of Big Sister’s Harvest Bed and declared that I had never felt as ill as I did in that moment. 

If I could, I would sleep all day long. I just paused to see if I could have a few waking hours and truly the answer is no, I could sleep all day long. Yesterday, my neutrophils dropped to 0.6, so we are anticipating being told that I have to go into the hospital today. Exhaustion doesn’t cover what I feel. I am drained and I am fairly certain were it not for people putting food and drink in front of me, I would consume neither.

As for St Bart’s itself, I cannot be kind. There has been mistake after mistake, some I think are potentially serious. On average, I have been sitting in the patient bays for 5-8 hours a day and the fact that it is not only me feeling let down by the service is of some comfort. Individually, some of the Medically Trained People are lovely and I’d like to see Jeremy Hunt work the 10 day week plus on call one of my doctors just worked, but collectively, it’s disjointed. 

I keep reminding myself that I am a pragmatist and the only new age things I believe in are my Mindfulness Colouring In Books, for if I believed in more, I know I would get bogged down on how the ward has made me feel and to what detriment that has had to my overall treatment. It’s a blog in it’s own right, but when I questioned whether I would still be standing if St Bart’s had been my hospital from the start of my treatment, I think that really says something about my perception of their care. 

Now, Mamma Jones has to read this to see if it makes any sense and I am going to close my eyes to see if I can shake off this headache I have had for the last 48 hours. I am not allowed paracetamol anymore. Or suppositories, but that is another medical issue entirely. Bloody neutropenia.

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