Tag Archives: Sleep

It’s Only Da ‘Roids

steroid
noun BIOCHEMISTRY 
Any large class of organic compounds with a characteristic molecular structure containing four rings of carbon atoms (three six-membered and one five). They include many hormones, alkaloids and vitamins.

Say what?
The above, I imagine after choosing a life of easy culture and civil service instead of biochemistry, is a fairly crude definition of a steroid. I do not know the molecular compounds of steroids. Why would I? Nor do I know the specifics of the steroid I have come to loathe called Dexamethasone. All I know is that the above description of a steroid fails, quite dramatically to encompass the sheer power of a drug I have been taking on and off for five years, and for that whole period of time, has been routinely been kicking me in the guts. 
Forget about the mood swings it creates, the changes to my body in the form of weight gain and facial hair have hardly made me a catch. I think the Myeloma already put paid to the romance, but the steroid beard certainly helped irradiate any of my sexual allure. You should have seen my steroid beard yesterday. It was particularly impressive yesterday because it lay in a bed of brace induced dry skin.
My quick Google search makes them sound so innocent. I know some steroids are innocent, but ever since I watched an episode of California Dreamin’ where Tiffany became addicted to steroids to enhance her volleyball performance, I have known there are something to be wary of. And wary I have been. 
Of Dexamethasone, the Internet describes it as a medicine and ‘a synthetic drug of corticosteroids type, used especially as an anti-inflammatory agent’. I’m not going to begin to understand what that means, but I will say that previous experience has proven that it is a remarkably good ‘anti-inflammatory agent’. 

Whilst we are on the subject of uses, I do not know, as this blog should clearly indicate, why I take this drug so routinely. Every Myeloma treatment is supported by steroids. Every treatment. I think I understand why I am talking it now, but why Dexamethasone supports pretty much all the myeloma treatment I have ever been on, the reason is anybody’s time to research. In light of my ignorance, I thought the least I could do was to investigate the list of known side effects. If you had asked me what these were two months ago, I would have answered without hesitation. Now? Since I started my new regimen however, the steroids have me feeling all out of kilter.
For the last three-four weeks, it would be fair to say that I do not recognise myself whilst on Dexamethasone. It should currently be called the ‘I’m Sorry’ drug, because I constantly seem to be apologising as a result of my behaviour whilst on them.
According to Wikipedia the side effects of Dexamethasome can include acne, insnomnia, vertigo, increased appetite, weight gain, impaired skin healing, depression, euphoria, hypertension, increased risk of infection, raised intraocular pressure, vomiting, dsyspepsia, confusion, amnesia, irritability, nausea, malaise, headaches and cataract. So, nothing big then?
In five years, I can say without hesitation that steroids are hard on the body. I have personally experienced at least nine of the listed side effects. They have always been hard on my body. Wikipedia’s list failed to list my once biggest problem with the stuff and that’s the fatigue. The inevitable crash after the fall. And it was always inevitable until I started my current treatment. Gone are the three days of sleep after taking a dose. I suppose I should be thankful for that at least. Unfortunately, they still leave my mouth tasting like gone off milk stored for 100 years in a rusty tin can. For me, this means I can’t drink water because it just extends the taste of rotten milk tin.
Why on earth are you telling us all of this, Emma?
Since I started taking it again, my relationship with Dex has changed, and the difference this has made in me is significant. It feels personality altering. 
I really did think I knew how to handle taking my steroids. If it made me stay up all night, I would stay up all night. Beards can be waxed or threaded. Crashes can be slept through with a bit of help from Julie Andrews.
Fast forward to now, and my reaction to the steroids feels extraordinarily different. Gone are the sleepless night. Gone is the excessive hunger. In, well, in is uncontrollable anger and tears. Lots and lots of them at the click of a finger.
Approximately 80mg of Dexamethasone a week, is making me into a quivering, worrying mess. I believe I was once stoic, but at the moment, I cry daily. I may cry when I am taken out of my brace because I irrationally worry that something will go wrong. I cry when I get out of the brace because it’s a restrictive torture device, and I do not wish to be restricted anymore. I cry on other occasions too; I cry because I fear the brace is not going to work and I’m terrified of having to wear it for longer than the six weeks I have remaining. I cry because the brace makes me feel lonely and I probably cry because I worry I am going to die. 
To be honest, given how alien my current circumstances are, I do not think I need a reason to cry. I just know that it is happening far too easily, far too often and the fault lies with the steroids. I can feel the anger and the pain boil up inside me, and nothing, and I mean nothing is going to stop me once it starts.
Uncontrollable tears isn’t my only new side effect, for the first time in five years, I can honestly say that I have now seen ‘roid rage. I am so quick to anger, there are times when I just want to scream and break things. There are times when I imagine myself breaking everything I own. There is no rhyme or reason to it, except, I expect, the steroids are bringing out all the anger I have about my current situation.
Just last week, I shocked myself with my behaviour twice whilst in the hospital. The first time I saw red was when I was stuck in bed desperate for the toilet, without my brace to mobilise. To paint the clearest picture, this scenario is my worst nightmare. You’d never catch me using a She-wee or peeing out doors; I’m just not that kind of girl. I have never been a public pee-er nor am I a good bed pan candidate due to the need sit on it with my crooked spin, big bum knowing that I have no privacy in a hospital bedroom. 
So there I was, in bed with a full bladder, in agony, asking some Medically Trained People for help. For anything that did not involve peeing in or near my bed. They clearly did not understand me, because they suggested a ‘pad’, which turned out to be a giant nappy. I can and did humiliate myself in several ways in hospital, but a nappy was pushing it too far. Way too far. 
My response to the nappy went something like this “I ask you for help and you bring me a fucking nappy? A nappy? I’m 33 years old, did you not consider how that would make me feel?” I was met with silence and blank faces, so through my tears, I went on. “If anybody would have been bothered to read my notes this morning you would have known that I should have been braced and allowed to go to the toilet at 7.30am, but it’s just typical of this ward that this did not happen. Get the fuck out of my room. Get the fuck out of my room and take the fucking nappies with you.”
And then I wet the bed. 
I apologised a lot that day. I am many things, but somebody who talks to Medically Trained People (or any people) like that, is not me. I was utterly ashamed of myself, but I could not stop myself either.
A few nights later, I had done some quality time in my brace. By ‘quality’, I mean at last 12 hours. By 21.30hrs, I had decided it was time to get into my bed and time for my breakthrough pain relief, so I pressed my bell. A nursing assistant attended, turned off my alarm and told me my nurse was busy. I waited 20 minutes, and I pressed the button again. The same thing happened again, but this time I explained the level of pain I was in. 30 minutes later, there was still not sign of my nurse and once again my alarm was turned off. By 22.45hrs, I was in so much pain and felt so completely helpless, I opened my bedroom door and slammed it. The satisfaction I gained from slamming the door was so great, I did it again. And then again. And yet still nobody came. After some more bell ringing and door slamming, at 23.30hrs, I finally came face to face with a nurse. Obviously, she was not my nurse and couldn’t help me, but she was a nurse who told me I could not possibly have been ringing my bell for two hours. I corrected her.
A few minutes later, I met my nurse for the night, who explained that she had been with a ‘poorly patient’. That was it for me, if it suited the situation, I would have gone back to slamming the door, but instead I told her that by telling me she had been with a poorly patient, she made me feel like I was insignificant and my illness was a mere annoyance in comparison. She then started talking to me in a very soft voice, to which I responded “where in my notes does it say I had a lobotomy or that I am stupid? Please do not talk to me that way”. 
So… I had to apologise again in the morning. My little outbursts become so frequent that I was regularly being visit by the Sisters to talk through my ‘issues’. Steroids were my issues.
I thought my episodes may have died down once discharged and in the comfort of my home. I was wrong. I’m still very quick to snap and I am convinced people are not listening to me or at least they don’t understand me, which is just as likely to get me to clench my fist.
A few nights ago, I was frustrated that I could not sleep and I suppose, being trapped in a bed did not help the situation either. So, like any other sane person on steroids, I used my grabber to pick all the DVDs (yes I still have DVDs) off a shelf above my bed and then once I had them, I threw them as hard as I could across my room whilst screaming and crying. I don’t know what had made me so angry (well I do, it was the steroids) in that moment, all I knew was I had to throw and scream as much as I could because that was the only thing that was going to make me feel any better. I suppose it’s better than resorting to physical violence, not that I am a particularly worthy opponent at the moment. In the end, I woke up Mamma Jones and she had to come and calm me down. 
I have listed some pretty shameful behaviour, behaviour that far outweighs the late night steroid induced internet shopping of old. In my current state, there does not have to be a catalyst to one of my fits. Yesterday, I just cried because I was scared. My point is, I am constantly trying to decipher what is a true emotion and what is a steroid emotion. My fear is that the two are interlinked and for the moment, I can only show my frustrations through the steroids.
It makes me want to avoid people. I snapped at Housemate last week because I felt he was not listening to me. My ‘roid rage scares me. I need friends when I get out of this brace, otherwise I could have saved £500 off my prepaid funeral. To be clear, I need friends for more than just filling seats at my funeral. I just fear that my current state will drive people away, even if it’s caused by the steroids.
It feels relentless. 
I’m not jovial. I’m not even sure when the last time I laughed was, although the brace can be blamed for that. It restricts my mouth.
EJBx
P.S. I cannot think of steroids without thinking of the sign my friend made for me all the way back in 2012, that states ‘It’ Only Da ‘Roids’. She’s literate by the way, I think the use of ‘da’ was designed to make me smile. It’s a thought I hold close. Through tears, shouting, late night shopping and whatever else it throws at me; steroids are not my controller. 
Myeloma is. I’m just not entirely sure how that helps me right now…

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Sweet Dreams

I have just been awoken from my sleep, and as I begin to type this in the bright lights of my bedroom, it’s 04:50hrs. I am awake not because I need to urinate, despite that being the most common reason for my sleep being interrupted. 

I was forced out of my sleep tonight because my upstairs neighbours woke me up with their loud and drunken behaviour. A familiar and loud accented squawk accompanied by banging. Once awake, I discovered that there were mice in my bedroom, because, like a detective, I spotted droppings on the floor at the bottom right corner of my bed. 

Housemate interrupted my stress over a poo that was not my own, because he too had heard the ruckus upstairs. He came into my rdressed in his jeans and patterned T-shirt ready to tell off our younger  neighbours. We spoke about how inconsiderate they are, and how old they must think we are. I explained to him that I had already dealt with the noise and had asked them to be quiet by up shouting to them from my open bedroom window. They had sheepishly responded with an apology, and the noise started to fade. 

At this point, I looked down at the mouse droppings to find that Colin’s canine companion, Bruce, had urinated over the mouse droppings and thus my carpet. I’m not talking a small amount of wee either, it was a river. I really smelly river, that had burst its bank and stained my bedroom wall. I cleaned it by stomping on tea towels, whilst Housemate teased me about my irrational fear of mice. Towards the end of this thankless task, we saw a mouse, which we chased, caught and flushed down the toilet. As he was now fully awake, Housemate decided he might as well stay dressed for the day and put his laundary on, which I warned him was antisocial. He didn’t care. If it woke the presumably by-now-passed-out-neighbours-upstairs, it woke them. Tit for tat. Unable to reason with him, I came back to my room, where I saw another mouse, one bigger than the one before. I gave chase. 

I followed the furry creature into my kitchen, where I found Bruce under the kitchen cupboards  with a mouse trap stuck to his noise and a box I recognised as poison in his mouth. I screamed and called for Housemate. When I looked back down, Bruce was no longer in his usually form of a red Boston Terrier, he was a child. He was my child. The mousetrap had gone, but the poison remained. We were surrounded by several mice, although they had taken the form of a minature panther and two Border Terriers wearing collars similar to that of Jock’s from The Lady and the Tramp

I asked Bruce how many poisoned pellets he had eaten, and he told me he had eaten just the one. I calmly asked him again, and he apologised for lying and admitted to eating what had become  five poisoned biscuits. I screamed for Housemate to call 999 for help. He ran into the kitchen clutching his phone and as he did, Bruce, my child, died in my arms…

And that is when I really woke up. 

Like in Dallas, it was all a dream. 

💤💤💤

Waking up crying, scared and/or confused does not happen as frequently as my post menopausal body wakes me up to toilet, but it does happen  frequently enough for it to bother me. The nightmares, for that is what they are, started shortly after my transplant in July. Back then, all those several days ago, it felt like I was having one a night but it probably was not that bad. I remember the noteworthy. On more than once upon a dream, I woke up calling for my Mum. Mamma Jones subsequently installed an alarm in my bedroom at her house, so I could contact her should I need her to comfort me during the night. I am 31 years of age. I raised the shouting for my Mummy with my counsellor and she said it was a very human reaction. Given the fact I have had two bone marrow transplants this year, and I have myeloma; I’m not beating myself up too much about shouting for my mother in this way. Plus, I have never used the alarm for dream related issues. For a glass of water on the other hand…

At one point, the dreams  were happening so frequently and were so unpredictable in content, I did not and would not sleep in my flat alone. Even now, even with knowing what they are, I do not feel confident being completely alone. It’s not why Housemate got his dog, but he comes in handy.

💤💤💤

I’m a little hazy when it comes to the exact timing, but I think it was three weeks after I came out of hospital that I mentioned the nightmares to a Medically Trained Person. I did not want to mention it, because I thought I was having them because I was stressed by the act of having an allogenic transplant and all the other crap that goes with it. In short, I did not want her to think I was having a breakdown, but I am glad I did. Her response put me at ease. To my surprise, the MPT was not surprised by the fact I was having nightmares. Apparently, so she said anyway, nightmares can be a side effect  of taking Ciclosporin. I take Ciclosporin! I also take diazapam and morphine. Put them together and what do you get? Bibbidi boddidi boo.

💤💤💤

The problem with my drug induced dreams is that they always begin firmly based in my reality. They often spiral beyond my reality, but by that point, I am hooked and convinced that it is all true. I am not going to list every bad dream I have had, in part because I feel like it is like somebody asking to look at my personal music library. Private. I don’t want people to know what scares me anymore than I want you to know that one of my most played songs is ‘Music of the Night’ from The Phantom of the Opera. For this tale, you just need to know that they occur and that they are realistic. You do not need to know who has ‘died’.

Fortunately, despite the fact I have had to turn my light on tonight and I will subsequently require a nap later today, the frequency of my nightmares has reduced. Somehow, I have managed to replace most of the nightmares with vivid dreams. Dreams that are not scary or sad, but dreams that seem to make me tired when I wake up. It’s a lesser of two evils. Occasionally, I will enjoy a dream, but most of the time I wish I did not dream at all.  I (falsely) imagine that if I did not spend so much time dreaming, I would need less sleep (or at least, I would have more energy).

Another downside to the vivid dream, is deciphering what is real over what is a dream, or what my predictive text just wrote, ‘dreamy’. The line between sleep and the mundane seems to be constantly blurred. Yesterday morning par exemple, I was convinced that Housemate had had to wake me up twice. It turned out that I had dreamt about the first knock on my door, letting the Bruce in and our chat about the weather. The weather? What does it say about my imagination that I dream about having a conversation about the weather?  I think that question best kept rhetorical.

I do prefer a mundane dream over a nightmare, but there is always a longer time delay before I  realise that it was just my imagination running away with me.  There have been days when I will go for most of the day believing I have spoken to somebody, replied to a text message or completed a task I set myself, when the reality is quite the opposite. Do not be alarmed, for I am told I am completely sane. 

My occasional confusion is easily done and justifiable, and I am not biased. Many a pesky dream starts with me being woken up from a dream. Dreams within dreams. It’s a great concept for a  clichéd packed arthouse film. Of course, I would have to dream up a dialogue far more riveting than a weather report.  

💤💤💤

One day, I heard my doorbell ring, so I woke up and head to my door to answer it to find nobody there. I returned to my bed, where I was surprised to learn  it was only 06.30hrs and the doorbell I heard was not my doorbell. It was not the sound of my doorbell. It was a dream. I have never been a sleep walker, so I found this to be borderline entertaining. By the time I woke up in my bathroom with my mobile phone in my hand ready to take a photograph, I knew it could be entertaining. I had dreamt that I had to take a photograph of the New York City sunrise from the window of my hotel room. I was slightly disappointed when I realised the only view I bad was of the windowless corridor in my flat. Another time, less entertainingly, I dreamt that Housemate had returned home after a night out and decided to have a bath. I woke up slightly later to find the lights on in my flat. My conclusion was that he had drowned in the bath, so I got out of bed to confirm there was a corpse in the bath and happily discovered that he had yet to come home. It was quite the relief, for I really did not want to see him naked.

💤💤💤

I hope, no, I dream that soon I will be off the Ciclosporin and that these sort of nighttime interruptions will cease. Nightmares and vivid dreams were not listed on my pre transplant consent form as a possible side effects. A definite oversight. It might not be Graft vs Host Disease or a secondary cancer, but they have an impact. A deep impact. Thank goodness I am as tough as nails. 

Right, I best try to go back to sleep. I think I have done enough now to forget about my dead dog child. I am not going to lie to you, I long for the days where I am only ever rudely awaken by the dustman. 

☀️

EJB X 

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Catch & Release

It has been seven whole days since I was told that I could go home and indeed, went home, leaving my week stay at St Bart’s but a distant memory. The latter part of that sentence is total bollocks by the way, the schedule of an allogeneic SCT, even if it is just a mini one like mine, makes it next to impossible to pretend that the hospital is just a misty water coloured memory in the corner of my mind. In the seven days I have been home, I have been to St Bart’s twice and in touch with them via phone or email on three other occasions. Essentially, I have been in touch with said hospital every working day since I left it. 

My bloods might be going in the right direction and the medically Trained People are making all the right noises, but did I leave there too soon? How the heck should I know? I spent all of Monday in hospital being tested for bugs and slugs in isolation, because they was a question over my current health.

If you were to speak to me or see me over the last week, you would probably conclude that I did leave too soon.  On Monday, a Medically Trained Person was asking me complex questions like “what was the date of your transplant?” and “what did you do before all of this?”, and I felt like I was taking my French oral GCSE without revision. All I could do was apologise that I could not speak normally. Essentially, you are looking at slow, occasionally drawling slur.

I have had two stem cell transplants before this, they were autos, meaning the cells were my own and the recovery was hard, especially after the first one. All so very hard. Upon discharge after both transplants, I got into a car and went straight back to Mamma Jones’ to be looked after until I felt like I could take a stab at doing it myself. My current treatment regime does not allow for that sort of leisure. It barely allows for sufficient rest.

Upon leaving last Wednesday, I was told that I needed to return on Friday or Saturday and then again on Monday for a Doctor’s appointment, leaving little time to make the four and a half hour round trip journey back to the Fens. And so, I decided that I would stay in my flat, with Housemate to help me until after the appointment on the Monday. There are many things one could say about this decision, but for today at least, as I continue to struggle to find my words, let’s just say it was decision most ‘foolish’. 

I am incapable of looking after myself. I imagine that is a fairly difficult statement for any 32 year old to say, accept I am 31 (the proofread) so I will say it again because I know it is hard for me to say; I am incapable of looking after myself. I am also incapable of planning anything, following a plot of any kind, having a prolonged sleep without experiencing a nightmare and not missing my friends.

I knew these facts last Friday, when with my bags still packed from the hospital sitting in my hallway , I phoned Manma Jones crying because my hair had started to fall out and I needed an hour’s lie down post shower, pre dressing in order to make myself presentable for blood tests. An hour after that I spoke to Big Sister and three hours after that she was at my front door ready to drive me back to the house of Mum Love. That night,  100 miles later, my mother needed to help me into my pyjamas. I then spent almost 23 hours of the next day sleeping. I did something quite similar yesterday, although yesterday, I only ate when food was presented to me at 18:10hrs. The previous day, after nine hours in the hospital, I realised that I had forgotten to eat anything at all. 

In hindsight, thinking that I could look after myself straight after receiving seven days of round the clock care, was just bonkers. Of course I have a Support Network in London led by Housemate and Bruce, but one of them is not anatomically capable of putting me in my pyjamas and the other one would be mentally scarred by the concept. Essentially, London assistance isn’t the same as the one I get with Mummy. The people of London have no reason to stand by me when I scream and shout and let it all out, and if I were being perfectly  honest, I will always try my hardest to avoid too many people seeing me at such a low ebb. A location I have been flirting considerably with this last week. 

I am trying not to overthink the situation because I know there is no turning back now and I also know how fortunate I am to be in this position in the first place. I just wonder that if I am finding this transition so difficult now, how the devil am I going to manage when the real thing gets started in a few weeks time? That’s rhetorical.

Some of you may be fortunate enough to have never been an inpatient in a hospital, so let me tell you that whilst in hospital one has little to no privacy even with the privilege of a private room. The NHS, the wonderful and flawed NHS, pays people to create and deliver a care plan, cook and carry  three questionable meals a day, waters you, takes your blood, check your pulse, breathing and blood pressure, prescribe and deliver the correct drugs at the right time and ensures said drugs are swallowed, they change your bedding and clean your room daily and these are just the people you see. Those tubes of bloods and tubs of my urine had to go somewhere, to somebody to check and the results put on to a computer, even if I wish these tests were done with greater haste. My point is, when one is an inpatient, all they have to do is try not to get too irritated by the lack of privacy. Everything else, even if it is not done to a quality one is quite used to, is done for you. One Sunday, for example, the threshold to my room was crossed 47 times in a 24 hour period; 45 times by Medically Employed People and twice by members of my Suppork Network. I do not know for what reason I documented this, but I believe it validates my next point.

  
The minute I walked out of the East Wing last Wednesday afternoon, all the responsibility for doing all of those listed above bar the things done by those unseen technicians handling my bodily fluids,  fell back on to me. It fell on to a me who continues to be nowhere near capable of doing such things alone. I can barely remember to drink, let alone to prepare the food I do not have the energy to eat, and remember to take the 20 odd pills I am prescribed each day at the correct intervals. And then there is cleaning, I attempted to lint roll my pillows today to remove evidence of my shedding hair and Inhad to do it in four separate sessions.

I went into my treatment with my eyes wide open. I knew it was going to be difficult, but I did not think that I would be doubting my ability to see it through so early on. A friend said to me earlier that I had rhino skin, which I sincerely hope is true for no other reason than all this treatment is actually going to make my skin thinner. Not just metaphorically thinner, but old-lady-be-careful-with-the-plaster-thinner. 

I think I just need a few weeks in bed to rebuild, but that is not afforded to me. 

My transfer to St Bart’s seems to symbolise much more than a change in venue for my treatment; everything seems different and all of it seems out of my control. Even though I may allow myself the occasional daydream that this time next year ‘I could be normal’, I am also a realist. I know that what is still to come is going to be so blooming difficult and I’m struggling to see where I am going to find the strength from to achieve my goals. My treatment feels relentless. This is relentless.

Prior to my discharge last Wednesday, I was asked to read an 79 page leaflet from Anthony Nolan called ‘The Seven Steps: The Next Steps’. I knew the contents of it, but I do not know if on the day I was getting to go home after spending a week in a drug fuelled neutropenic haze, I needed to read “it is important to remember that although you are being sent home from hospital, and an important phase of the transplant process is complete, it will be many months before you are fully recovered”. Define ‘many’.

The treatment is intense and I have not had find time to catch my breath. Reading that leaflet seemed to have cast a spell over my whole week. I do not normally feel so negative. That leaflet basically said, don’t relax yet, for the worst is yet to come. 

EJB x 

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Crashed

I may have said in my previous blog that I was going to write two blogs about my brain function, but I have since decided that that would be a disservice. We all need another sorry tale about how hard my life is, before I can show you that I am the bravest person I know, who was born in the 24 May 1984. The logic behind my decision is sound, if I do say so myself. Part I took on one aspect of my fatigue. To truly understand it and for me to document how I am currently spending my days, no story about my life would be fully complete if I did not mention the overriding power of my day-to-day exhaustion.

Exhaustion, which is a daily occurrence. Exhaustion, which is both predictable and unpredictable in how it manages to drag me down to my sofa or my bed. Exhaustion, which on a good day, gives me approximately four hours of energy on a good day. Exhaustion, which if I happen to go over my daily allowance of energy, finds a way to quickly come and bite me on my wobbly bum.

I have said it before, but it is worth reiterating it, fatigue is not the same as requiring sleep. When it comes to this fatigue, I will take exhaustion without sleep, over decreased brain function any day. I’d rather not experience either, but I am trying desperately hard not to feel sorry for myself, and thus acceptance of these facts as I describe them to you, is crucial.

My current treatment consists of Revlimid tablets everyday for three weeks with one week off, accompanied by weekly doses of Dexamethasone and Velcade. To save you reaching for the Google, Dex equals steroids and Velcade equals bleach. It was the reintroduction of Velcade to my body in December, that sent my brain into it’s current downward spiral.

I cannot dress it up and I cannot lie. I am constantly tired. Is this enough clarity for you or do I need to go on for another 11 paragraphs describing what fatigue is like to hammer my point home? I think we know the answer to that one.

I’m really into examples at the moment and last weekend, I can provide you with a rather mundane one. I fell asleep at Mamma Jones’ dining table after I had conducted the most exciting of activities, which included a shower, decanting two tins of baked beans into a saucepan and eating my lunch. I had been out of my bed for a total of three hours. Three whole hours.

Spectators of my life, may believe that giving in to my fatigue on almost a daily basis may exasperate said fatigue. I have heard it many a time. Somebody will kindly advise me to go out, believing that it will make me feel less tired. It is a tactic that I have tried and tested, time and time again, each time willing for a different result. I can conclude, by shouting it from the rooftops, that my fatigue does not work that way. If I am tired, I am tired and nothing is going to change the feeling of complete and utter lethargy.

I am fortunate that there continues to be somebody in my life to tell me that it is okay for me to be tired. I especially need this provision in London. On occasion, he still needs to tell me that I cannot go out when my will is in deep battle over my body. A few weeks ago, I had planned a lovely Saturday of brunch and the cinema followed by an evening out. Having completed the first two activities, totalling five hours of activity, I knew the minute I walked through my front door that I would not be leaving my flat again that day. In fact, I did not leave my flat until two days after that. Missing an opportunity to socialise never gets any easier, let me assure you, and my frustration in the days that followed that Sunday was palpable.

On a much smaller scale, there are moments in my day when I feel so exhausted that picking up a glass of water is a chore. On my bad days, I might not even pick up that glass of water. The are a whole host of other daily activities where my execution of them is hindered by the feeling of nothingness, that I rarely seem to be able to escape from.

I know that this side effect makes me unpredictable and to many people, it makes me unreliable. Most of all, just with my decreasing brain function, it makes me boring. Many a night I wake up worrying that my flakiness, is perceived as just that, cancellation on a whim. Laziness. Selfishness. Indifference.

Haemo Dad was conservatively labelled a ‘fool’ last weekend because he told me that sometimes, I need to be seen to be making an effort with people. He is not the only person to say something like that to me, it is simply the most recent example. It’s a comment that makes me see red, and I’d probably still see red on this subject even if I were not on steroids.

My chemo brain does not stop me from fondly remembering the days when I could have multiple plans. It does not stop me from yearning for the days when I could socialise two days in a row. The thought that people in my Support Network think that they do not see me, or I do not attend events simply because I am not trying hard enough plagues me. Hence my red rage at the weekend. I think, and I know I am somewhat biased in my opinion, that I do try incredibly hard.

Given my current treatment schedule, I have not had That Friday Feeling for a long time. Thursdays through to Sundays tend to be my worst days, and they tend to roll into one big lump of time rather than four distinguishable days and nights. On the occasions when I make weekend plans, because, you know, I am 30 years old and need to live, it’s a military operation. I am going away this weekend, hopefully to enjoy myself and in order to facilitate this, I have ensured that I have no plans on Monday and Tuesday. I also forced myself to sleep for 24 hours since Wednesday morning. I have no idea if my planning will actually be of any benefit. Worrying about it, is also tiring. Can you see a theme here?

A friend of mine said to me that I always seemed to be busy and this makes it very difficult to plan anything with me. It was a conversation that made me cry like a baby when I was alone and had the time to think about it…. I suppose, to some extent, I am busy. My fatigue makes it very difficult for me to be flexible. In order to go out a few days a week, and by out I mean a meal, a trip to the cinema or my hospital treatment, I am forced to rest on all the other days of the week. Few will see and understand how difficult this can be.

It’s difficult on so many counts. It is difficult for me to go out and it is difficult for me to stay in. I strongly suspect it is a balance I will never get right. I pull myself in so many directions on the subject, but so too do the people in my life. I hasten to add that they do it for the best of intentions. On Wednesday for example, a Senior Medically Trained Person gave me a slight telling off for doing too much, and by doing too much, I am apparently making my fatigue worse. It is not my interpretation of my life but what do I know? I studied modern history, not medicine.

I could go on and on about this until the end of time, but that’d just be a waste of my energy. And so, I will end this. I need to rest my head.

EJB x

P.S. I promise that Part III will be like a double expresso with a pound of sugar, as opposed to this, which I would compare to a two day hangover. Everyday.

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Mashed

Hello there and welcome to Part I of, let’s say, two blogs about my brain function. I assume it’ll be in two parts; I have not written them yet.

The first post will be something of a downer as I describe what it is like to exist with constant Chemo Brain. As a romcom sort of girl however, I intend to pick things back up in Part II with an inspirational story of how I manage to fine some respite from my brain’s drug induced default position of blurry shapes.

So, back to the downer that is Part I…

I need to be clear about something that is commonly misunderstood. Fatigue as I know it now, is not just limited to tiredness. Of course tiredness is a big part of it, but there is so much more to it. So much more that is hidden from your view.

Essentially, my brain is straining and I know it is straining. In the last two months, as my fatigue has increased, so too has my inability to concentrate, think, remember and reason. Don’t get me wrong, I am not sitting at home all day long unable to tie my shoe laces. That’s a bad example, for I actually cannot do up my show laces, but that is not because I do not know how, it’s because my back forbids it. My recent days and weeks mostly blur into one big lump, where time passes quickly, with a noticeable lack of cognitive brain function and imagination. My time passes quickly and yet I do not know how, nor can I recall any use of something I once knew as ‘imagination’. I miss it.

This blog is a good example of my inability to think. When this all started, as much as I noticed that the drugs were frying my brain, I could still form sentences that did not always include ‘of course’, ‘so’ and ‘obviously’. Writing was easy. It’s not easy for me now. I like to think that I am rather witty, but realistically, after a glance through my most recent posts, my wit may well be in my past.

Believing something is better than nothing, I will continue to stick to the same old vocabulary to keep people abreast of My Myeloma developments, even though I know the content is becoming dryer than my skin post radiotherapy. I sit down to write a blog and more often than not, a blankness takes over and what I want to say cannot be said because the words just bounces around my head. If I can overcome that particular hurdle, I then find that the act of writing things down, something that remains important to my overall wellbeing, uses up my daily thought allowance. I blame this for my current, simmering level of madness. That is my story and I am sticking to it.

Waking up one day and realising that your ability to communicate is not what it once was, is not something to relish nor welcome.

After some thought, I still view my treatment as a means to an end, but the truth is, my treatment comes at a big cost that few people recognise and I can quantify. All I know for certain is that I cannot help my boringness, I plead with thee.

I watched a film last weekend, I will not tell you the name of it because I am about to give away a big part of the plot. One of the characters is accused of running somebody over with his car and his defence is that he cannot remember doing it. Why you wonder? The answer is Chemo Brain. An actor playing a doctor actually says ‘Chemo Brain’. Now, I have no intention of running somebody over in a car, I cannot look at my blind spot anyway, but it made me think, slowly, about the losses I have had to deal with on my current treatment… I do not think that the plot development I mentioned is implausible.

I am backing this blog up with examples, silly examples maybe, but examples all the same, so that you do not think I am exaggerating or feeling overly maudlin. When I say that my days blur into one, and that I have a limited concept of time, that is not an exaggeration. Big Sister told me off a few days ago because I had not spoken to her for a week. If somebody had asked me about this prior to our conversation, I would have said that the last time we spoke was a mere few days before the question came ‘where have you been?’. The answer of course to that question was ‘I don’t know’.

Last Monday, I attended a two hour lecture on the Freudian concepts of Eros and Thanatos in modern cinema. Cultural for sure. The following day, I knew that Thanatos meant death, but I could not remember the word. I had to look it up five times before it stuck and by Wednesday I had forgotten the word again. Right now, if I think really hard, I can remember the titles of three of the six films discussed.

I used to have a good short term memory. Past tense. My brain now seems to be built for one man shows because I cannot remember multiple names in one go. A few weeks ago I watched a film in the afternoon and come 20:00hrs, I had no recollection of what the film was. In my defence, the film was terrible.

If modern technology did not exist, if I did not walk around with constant access to Google in my pocket, I would be a word beginning with ‘f’ and ending in ‘d’. I am constantly making notes and scrolling through my messages to see what I have said to the various people in my life. I live in a constant state of fear that all my conversations are the same and people are just too polite to tell me that we have already spoken about what it is we are speaking about the last time we spoke.

There is an obvious side effect to the side effect of which I speak. It’s called monotony. Do you know what monotony does? It makes a person boring. Dare I say it, it makes a person tedious. My worry? It has made me tedious. Of course, nobody will say that I am a god awful bore, at least not to my face, but they can and will think it. My phone records would probably back this up.

A month ago a friend of mine told me off for asking so many questions in conversation. It plagued me for a week or so, until I realised that it is something I do now to firstly enable me to actively participate in a conversation. Secondly, having thought about and asked a question, I am more likely to remember the answer. It is a far from ideal way of engaging.

It has, in my brief myeloma voyage, never been as severe for such a long period of time. Reading has been a constant difficultly and the chances of following the plot of Game of Thrones were significantly reduced the first day I took morphine, but there is so much more to it now. I want to be able to articulate myself. I want to remember to reply to messages and phone calls. To allow the former, I would be greatly assisted in knowing how long a day is. And finally, I would very much enjoy recalling information mid conversation without feeling the need for a celebratory fist pump.

As Part I draws to a close and on the eve of two transplants, my main questions are, how much worse can it get and how many people will still be around at the end of it?

EJB x

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Some Festive Cheer

It is Christmas Eve. Christmas Eve happens to be one of the best days of the year, if like me, you happen to love Christmas. I am Kevin McCallister, such is my love of Christmas, it’s traditions and the pure wonder that can be a nicely decorated Christmas tree. This Christmas, more than the last two I have with the disease they call myeloma, I have planned and longed for a ‘normal’ Christmas. By ‘normal’ I mean ‘special’. I had meticulously planned something so much better than the 12 Days of Christmas, so that I could enjoy every single moment of Christmas commercialism. I wanted to gorge on Bing Crosby and Jimmy Stewart until the leftover meat fertilises next year’s tomatoes.

By today, according to my plan, all I should be doing is some elective baking, some constant film watching and some smiling. That is not what I will be doing today. Instead, I have all my presents to wrap, one present to buy and copious amounts of rest to fit in where and wherever I can find it. The need for rest is making me act like Scrooge at the beginning of the Muppet’s Christmas Carol. I do not have the time for it, and all it does is remind me what I was supposed to do.

The reason for my childish want of a normal Christmas will become more apparent as 2015 progresses.

I should have known that my plans would have gone wrong. I should have known that instead of coming back to my parents’ house early to enjoy my nieces’ festive excitement, I would be coming home to my parents’ house to get into bed, via A&E with some antibiotics. I have been a good girl this year; I did not need coal. I have been unwell every Christmas since my diagnosis, so I suppose I am just carrying on with the new tradition.

Now, I would be the first person to put my hands up in the air and wave them around to confirm that I have been displaying the sort of behaviour that shows that I care very much about Christmas and the more I care, the more option I give the myeloma to deviate from it.

Over the last few weeks I have been slowly tying myself in emotional knots in festive anticipation. I have a wonderful example of this. Much to his dismay, and my own surprise, Housemate recently incurred my mighty festive wrath after showed some initiative by taking the Christmas tree out of it’s box and put some fairy lights on it whilst I was out galavanting at 16:00hrs one afternoon. My initial reaction and then the one 24 hours after the deed was done, were ones that some, if they were being polite, could describe as ‘an overreaction’. As I concluded the following day, there is a lot of emotion connected to that Christmas tree. I do not want to be morbid, so I shall not type why it upset me, but if you add a failed bone marrow transplant to future Christmases, you’ll get somewhere near my reasons for wanting a saccharine Christmas.

I do tell myself that I have to be stronger and that I should not complain about my situation. Indeed, I do not want to complain about my situation. Myeloma and Christmas just do not go together and I know that despite what will follow in this blog, there are other families who will feel more pain than I this Christmas. To them, I apologise for my self indulgence…

That said, as it is Christmas Eve, I want to find the festive cheer that left my loins five days ago. In the lead up to Christmas I dragged myself North, South, East and West in order to fully embrace, as fully as my body would allow, the festive good times. There was a voice in the back of my head as I typed the last sentence telling me that I just lied to you. I should have added that as much as I wanted to do everything I did in the lead up, I knew that doing it all would be bad for my body especially when my hospital added five appointments last week. The bespectacled voice also says I probably should have shown more strength and stayed in when I needed to and I should have worried a little bit less about letting people down and had the confidence to think my friends would understand that me needing to stay in and lie on my sofa is not a reflection of my love for them, but is in actual fact, much needed medicine that would have got me to Christmas Day without a temperature of 38.6.

Alas, whilst I will still make it to Christmas Day, I will not make it in the way in which I had planned. I will not have the time to watch the films I wanted to watch nor will I bake the things there are a not enough people in the family to eat. I might not be able to rubber stamp my own wrapping paper for Ebenezer’s sake.

This illness crept up on me at my cousin’s fabulous wedding at the weekend. Not particularly unwell with anything drastic, but I had a fever, a cough and the things that usual accompany fevers and coughs. An annoyance if one is healthy, something a bit more if you are receiving treatment for myeloma. I do not have the resilience to battle it. True to form, to A&E I went on Monday for four whole hours for IV antibiotics. The general public out there with their bugs do not have to do that. They might complain like I am right now though.

Anyway, Mamma Jones says I have to try and get out of bed now. I just watched Die Hard 2: Die Harder. I only added that so you know that I am trying to find some good in a bad situation. I just wish, given the importance of this Christmas, I could do it without factoring myeloma into every single task.

If George Bailey has taught me anything it is that one should be thankful for what they have, so that is what I am going to try to do today and with that in mind, I wish you all a very Merry Christmas.

🎄🎄🎄

EJB x

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Crashed

Last Thursday morning, I woke up and asked myself how it could possibly be Thursday morning and I promised that I would write about how I had spent three days in bed with time on fast forward, later that day. The only issue was that on Thursday, I was still in bed and my time was still on fast forward. It was a feeling that lasted for a further two days. It is Monday morning now and I no longer feel like my time is just passing me by, nor do I feel like I need to stay in bed all day. It is a feeling that I can only describe as an achievement. An achievement that needs to be embraced in moderation, obviously.

The fault lies with the steroids. The beastly steroids, steal my time and effect my mood, and try as I might, when it happens there is not a damn thing I can do about it. Last week, I was crashing. I want to give what happens to me a new name, as I doubt the word ‘crash’ is medically accurate. Though a ‘crash’ is exactly what it feels like to me. My body stops, so too does a lot of my cognitive function and I temporarily do not feel like myself. The time goes by so quickly; the lack of achievement feels like a complete waste of my 30s.

Here’s a little secret; cancer is not glamorous. Sometimes, you really do have to lie in bed, sweating, whilst flashing your knickers, shoving ice lollies down your gob to enhance the taste buds, for five whole days. Knowing that whilst you, or in this case I do this, everybody’s life around me just goes on like normal. I am one to blow my own trumpet and as I told myself last week, it takes a certain amount of bravery to do absolutely nothing and not cry hysterically about it, feeling insanely sorry for oneself.

My week, my friends, went a little monotony like this…

On Monday, my mouth tasted like I had had an every lasting metal flavoured gobstopper and I was tired. I was not tired because of my steroids, I was tired because I had spent too much energy on the Saturday before the Monday. I therefore decided that my flat was where I needed to be. I also completed the last parts of my crash preparation, which pretty much involved making sure that the fridge and freezer contained food that could be cooked by a brain dead zombie experiencing dizzy spells, who struggles to bend down and calculate timings. The preparation was important, I had decided in the week leading up to it that I needed to see whether I could look after myself during a crash. I also decided that it was essential for me to succeed in this challenge.

I cannot remember anything else about Monday apart from the fact that I watched a film with Housemate on and I told him just before I went to sleep that my crash had started. It’s a subtle change, but last week the first thing I noticed, apart from the horrific taste in my mouth, was not the fatigue but the fact that the skin on my neck and shoulders felt bruised. This is what steroids do to me. Well, it is one thing steroids do to me.

Tuesday and Wednesday are a blur. Tuesday and Wednesday were the worst days. I know I showered and got dressed, but neither activities occurred before midday and neither activity was what I would describe as easy. I started several films, but I do not think I actually finished any in one sitting. I wanted to sleep and when I was not sleeping, I was really just staring at the tea stain on my bedroom wall unable to collect my thoughts. I may have spent a lot of time looking at my phone, hoping for and getting news from the outside.

I did not leave the flat during this time. Not because I did not want to, but because I knew that I probably would not have been able to get anywhere. Housemate cooked me dinner and encouraged me to leave my bedroom, which was a good thing. Moving the 16 steps from bed to sofa, gave me a nice change in scenery and online demand television service.

I was not maintaining a spreadsheet of my activity, but it would be remiss of me not to mention that during these two days, at least two hours of my time was spent attempting to toilet. On Wednesday, after 45 minutes I had to give up because I had a dead leg. If you want me to be graphic, it was my right leg.

By Thursday, when I felt it should only be Tuesday, I needed to escape the flat. Escape I did, 10 minutes in a taxi to a matinee screening at my local cinema. It was progress. I also made a little trip to Sainsbury’s on my return to stock up on ice lollies. I was out of the flat for three hours and that was enough for me. It was too much for me. By late afternoon, I was back in bed, feeling once more like a zombie. If zombies also experience inexplicable rage, which after I few hours, I deduced was due to the fact that from Friday-Monday, I had taken a rather hefty dose of mood altering Dexamethasone and not because Housemate made me wait less 30 seconds to reach my ice lollies.

Friday was much the same as the three days that proceeded it. I was improving, I know this because I actually cooked something rather than reheat something to eat. I also cared about what I ate and it was not something I had to do for energy. Okay, I also went out for lunch with my cousin. That trip, was a whole hour out of my flat.

All in, last week was a frustration. It was not helped by the current humidity in London. Heat and steroids are not a happy cocktail. That said, it was not as frustrating as I thought it would be. Unlike a fortnight ago when I thought there was not a chance of me getting through my treatment, I realised as I was lying in my pit, that I would get through it. I cannot sugarcoat it, the crash is awful, and I hate that because of the extra dose in my first cycle, I will be crashing again next Monday. Next Monday for goodness sake.That said, this is temporarily my job. Taking my medicine, doing what I am told and spending a week in bed, is my new job. If I think about it this way, I know that I can banish some of the frustration away. It is not laziness. It is just the way things are for me.

I do not want to embarrass anybody, but I know now that whether I crash in Deeping or London, there are people around who have my back and are on hand to assist me, should I need it or request it. The need and the request, do not often go hand in hand. I felt thoroughly supported last week, and although it was me feeling and looking a mess, it felt almost like a team effort with Bruce as the mascot.

I friend told me that on Thursday of last week she went to an exhibition, to a lunch, to the cinema and then went out in the evening. Her day had more activity than my five days in bed. It had more activity than my entire week. I will learn in time to not get jealous about such displays of energy. Like I said, in a week’s time will be a good place to start.

As for my weekend, well, I ended the crash with a casual trip to Buckingham Palace. That in itself and the two shandies I had in the evening, meant yesterday was a day of rest. Now let me tell you something for nothing, after a week of not being able to leave my flat, a day choosing to stay in my flat watching a sitcom aimed at females, may be one of the finest feelings known to myeloma-kind.

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Buckingham Palace

And now, I shall attempt to have a fulfilling week. I need to refill my cupboards. Stat.

EJB x

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That’s Life

The lyrics to ‘That’s Life’ keep going round and around my head. It’s okay, I know what you are thinking, how trite. It’s trite because it is trite. Did Frank Sinatra really just pick himself up and get back in the race, every time he found himself flat on his face? Or is that just what he, and the thousands of imitators told themselves they should be doing as they drowned their sorrows in whiskey, killing more and more of their brain cells whilst emptying their wallets? That song makes it sound so easy. You have a bad time of it, but you just get up and fight again. At least I think that is the correct interpretation. I do not want to be dead by July. We’re in July.

I have always seen myself as fighter. The silent, mystery sort of fighter, but a fighter all the same. First time round, My Myeloma brought the best of that out of me. It was my badge of honour. Giving up, not fighting, collapsing, were not an option. Occasionally, I would bawl into my pillow and produce copious amounts if snot, but never did I ever really think that there was no point in attacking myeloma with all my might. When I could not get out of bed for days on end, the time I spent 90 minutes sweating through my clothes in Mamma Jones’s wet room as I tried to force out a week’s worth of faeces as my mouth repeatedly salivated tin, when I could not bend down to reach my oven. Never once, did I think there was no point in my trying to achieve what were, in essence, very limited goals, Back to the song, I did think it was worth a single fly, and so, there was absolutely no need for a big bird or the thoughts of me not trying. I just did. I just carried on. I’m not sure who I was racing, but I did not want to lose, so I got up. Again and again and again.

If you have not sensed it already, I do not currently feel like fighting. I do not feel like doing anything. Correction, I feel absolutely incapable of going anything. I feel alienated. In the last week, my sum of achievements have been extremely limited, and to make myself appear slightly better than I have been, I will include organising my weekly drugs as an achievement. I also got on a 45 minute train from London to Peterborough. That is it. It’s not a feeling I am used to, nor am I relishing in enjoyment from what others might consider to be relaxing. I am not answering my phone. My phone is a connection to people’s lives who are not bogged down in myeloma, guilt of having myeloma and the knowledge that there will be at least another two years of this.

Since Thursday morning, after I achieved my first night’s sleep since Saturday, I have slept and cried. Cried and slept. And flipped/reversed it again. I have been absolutely incapable of anything else or any other thought. I have attempted to watch the big shiny box at the end of my bed, but I just fall asleep, or I start crying. It is possible to do both, I have tried it. I have gone to bed telling myself that the next day will be an improvement, but it is not. I see no point in it. I see absolutely no point in any of this. Let us just be thankful that I continue to shower.

I am wholeheartedly angry with myself for my current mental state. A relapse, this relapse, was an inevitability. Earlier this week, I think I knew this and I felt like my stoicism that has been my good friend this two years at least had returned. I do not know what has changed, maybe it was missing my friend’s funeral because my body was too weak to walk. I currently have no strength to fight. I want to sleep. I want to go to sleep for a really long time until I can wake up, have this be over, or more realistically, be strong enough to get myself back in the race.

This was an inevitability, so I do not understand why I am so shocked. I do not understand why I am mourning so much. Most of all, I do not understand why I am allowing any head space to the thoughts that fighting is just a waste of time and that I might as well let it take over now for it will save more grief and money for everybody in the long run. I’m not ready to fight yet. I am not ready to see people tilt their heads at me and for me to be jealous at them for being able to tilt their heads. I do not feel strong enough to find a current middle ground to the life I had a month ago and the one I have now. I cannot manage the responsibilities.

It’s folly I tell you, folly. I do not want to die. Nor do I want to give up. I just haven’t quite worked out how I can do these things, when I feel like I have been kicked in the gut and had my life stolen away from me for the second time.

This is temporary. It has to be. That’s life, after all! I’m definitely myeloma’s puppet, pauper and pawn, right now.

I think there are people out there relying on me to find my strength. I am most definitely one of these people. I just really do not know if I am ready for that yet.

Can somebody else please change my tune please? I do not want a drunk somebody singing this to me, tie undone, as my only option.

EJB x

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The Inconsiderate Old So and So

The hour is 03:31hrs and I think you need to be aware that at this moment in time, I am highly aware of my hands and my feet. My feet, my hands with their ten fingers, when not buzzing are stinging. Let us throw my left arm into the mix for added discomfort. The effect of which, does not create a snug bug in a rug scenario.

As I am sure you can deduce, I am finding this development to be most inconvenient. For such awareness of appendages, opens the door to thoughts that normally are only permitted one minute of attention per day, before being shut away until the next day, and so on and so forth unless I am feeling ‘hormonal’.

Hands and feet. I have hands and I have feet. There is a thin layer of fibreglass on them.

As parts of my body continue to prickle, it begs the question of why I am aware of them today, when I was not aware of them at all 28 days ago. As one lies in the darkness of night, I can confirm that pondering the possible consequences of me being able to tell you that I have hands and feet, does not directly lead to REM.

Ten fat, marginally hairy fingers. Ten fat, marginally hairy fingers.

Then one remembers a conversation they had whilst receiving the root cause tonight’s unwelcome guest, around someone special’s forthcoming birthday. A birthday, which happens to be a milestone. Then what happens here is a dark trip into Maudlin Town, because a birthday to me is not simply a sign of getting older, it is a big, flashing neon sign that says I have a higher rate of mortality than you. To me, celebrating it is like taking photographs at a funeral; inappropriate.

Fire. Fire. My arches are on fire.

So then, the options for commemorating my birth become more entangled in my brain. Not celebrating it would be depressing. Celebrating it may also be depressing, but then, it may not be. Though what if there is nobody to celebrate it with me, My Myeloma does appear to have diminished the number of people I can turn to for a hug.

Bad vibrations. Bad vibrations.

The thought about one occasion then expands into the wider life losses I have experienced because of my illness. It expands into every life loss I have experienced because of My Myeloma.

Punishment for not being sinistral, that is what this is. Attention seeking.

Then the frustration creeps in. Frustration at being misunderstood; at having no control of my life losses and having to explain the impact of such losses over and over again for it to continue to be misunderstood or bypassed; which in turn only serves to make me feel more and more isolated and alone.

And then before you know it, I am here absolutely hating myeloma and everything it stands for. It is, after all, most inconsiderate. I am resuming some sort of life now and I do not have the time for this sort of nonsense. I am on the 07:35hrs train to Wakefield for goodness sake.

And then it goes round and round and round and round.

Anyway, I must put my phone down now. I have lost all feeling in my thumbs.

💤💤💤💤💤💤💤💤

EJB x

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A Good Night’s Sleep

The secret to a goodnight’s sleep seems to be well and truly hidden under a rock that has been buried at sea, for this particular post transplant myeloma patient. This does not please me. I like my sleep. I love my sleep in fact, but in the post transplant world, my sleep seems to be more of challenge rather than a pleasure.

And I suffer from fatigue! Oh the confusion of it all. Fatigue, rest, sleep. In my mind, they are mutually exclusive, and that does not make for an easy life.

The perfect night’s sleep, as I understand it, has an attractive person get into their crisp pyjamas at 22:30hrs, slide under their bed sheets at 22:33hrs, turn off the light at 22:35hrs after they have removed their spectacles, close their eyes five seconds later, sign a sign of contentment, to then awake eight hours later. That’s the dream.

I was once told by an old lady trying to feed me a red apple, that good people should not experience this world between the hours of 00:00hrs-06:00hrs. Evidentially, I am not a good person. In reality, my sleep is not a continuous, uninterrupted visit to my dreamland, which I am sure everybody wants in life. My sleep is not now categorised by irritating insomnia. My sleep does not look like the ritual mentioned above, my ritual is something else entirely. My sleep has become an endurance test, or a 4’6″ x 6’3″ nightly edition of the Crystal Maze. My challenges include, but are not limited to the following;

* The Hot Flush – these are dire, they make my bed smell and they force me to sleep in my knickers. I experience at least three of these a night. I do not want to make anybody have ill feelings towards me, but yesterday, I woke to found a sweat ring around where my head had been on the pillow. They cannot be combated even if I roll over to the cooler side of the bed.

* The Weak Bladder – this is self explanatory. I have not peed in my bed yet, if I could change my bed sheets by myself, maybe I would do. I cannot however, so I have to get up.

* The Nighttime Thurst – an unexplained phenomena, that encourages the point above.

* The Back Pain – a quiet constant, awakened if I attempt to move at all in my sleep. Previously, on my initial diagnosis, I learned to sleep without moving, the pain improved and I rejoiced by doing a starfish. The pain has now returned, but the need to move has not.

* The Easy Pins and Needles – introduced after two rounds of Velcade; enhanced when one remains in the same position for longer than an hour. Also includes the ‘Dead Limb.’

The challenges sometimes double or triple up. Sometimes, occasionally, now and then, once and a while, they come all at once. That blows my minds because some of them contradict the other. One thing is for sure, they each come at least once a night, and have done so since I had my blood played with.

I am told that they will all improve with time. I remain hopeful. With regards to the need to urinate, I will give the imaginary Them, that. They were correct. As for the rest of it? Who kNOWS.

At least with the insomnia, I was physically comfortable…

EJB x

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