Tag Archives: Velcade

Six Weeks

It’s been two months since I last published a blog and let me tell you this, it has been quite the two months. After having this wretched disease for over five years, I thought little would surprise me. Well, I expected the whole looming death part to have a different trajectory to the routine I am used to, but as I said, I expected that to be slightly different. I never considered what the steps will look like getting from the relapse stage , to the end of the line stage. I always assumed it’d be easy but increasingly, I feel I might have been far too optimistic.
Somehow, in five years, I had settled into an uneasy routine with My Myeloma. It’s quite simple really, I would have some sort of treatment, which would work for a bit, then it would fail, then the Medically Trained People would somehow magic up another treatment for me to start, and thus the cycle would start again. 
I had five years of this. Don’t get me wrong, some horrible things happened along the way; it shouldn’t make the list, but losing my hair is still up there in the shitty events. I didn’t really enjoy any of my transplants and I definitely did not enjoy the time I had to spend five days in St Bart’s because I caught Influenza B. On the plus side, I thoroughly appreciated any drug regime that could be taken at home. I had a few of those.
What am I saying, all of that is in the past? If the last two months have taught me anything, and I am still trying to decipher exactly what further lessons I needed to learn by the age of 33 about my cancer, is, that Myeloma is a load of fucking shit that if there were a hell, it should be confined to purgatory trapped under a full, infected bed pan, never to bother nice (even horrible) individuals again. Oh yes, just to keep you up to date, I have also learnt about bed pans recently. And sick bowls. And those cardboard things that collect one’s waste by resting on the loo seat. I know it all.
On 7th September, I returned to UCLH for a clinic appointment. Prior to that I had found out that the trial at St Bart’s was no longer working and I had been experiencing what can only be described as extreme and unbearable pain that I had blamed on doing too much on holiday. The pain itself was predominantly in and around my right rib cage. 
As I had self diagnosed every relapse since 2012, I had spent about a month begging for some imaging. St Bart’s took no action, I would question if the staff knew my name, but thankfully UCLH did know my name and once they had the necessary images, man, did they take action.
I was admitted to UCLH immediately on the 7th September following an appointment, during which my family and I were told we were coming to the end of the line of treatment. Not only that, but there was also something wrong with my neck. I say ‘something’ because I think it took me well over a week to get my head round what a compression on one of the C vertebrae meant. I don’t recommend it. I don’t recommend developing a mass that pushes through your rib cage either, Alien (or at least that’s how I like to picture it) style. It cannot be sugarcoated. I entered that hospital with Mamma Jones and Big Sister in a bad way. 

And that bad way only worsened over the next six, that’s right, SIX weeks…

I don’t even know where to start. If you are independent, like to toilet alone and enjoy walking around, I’d say what followed would be your worst nightmare. It was mine. 

You may have deduced that not all was or is well with my spine. Due to the compression and the location of it, I arrived at my bed to be told that I was no longer permitted to walk. As in, no walking at all. Not only was I not allowed to walk but if I wanted or needed to be moved in my bed, I would have to be rolled by four Medically Trained People. My head and neck, could not be elevated anymore than 30 degrees. Three weeks later, this changed to 40 degrees and the news that I could roll myself, but by this point, the damage to my ego had already been done. Not to mention the damage to my legs for not walking for three weeks.
Despite being in denial about it, shitting is a necessity that eventually cannot be avoided. The day I could not avoid it was Day 11 in hospital when there were only male nurses available. I’m a 21st Century Woman, so I went ahead and let the team of four roll me onto a bed pan. I did not say anything when they had to roll me again to clean my bum. Nor did I say anything the next day, during one of my five daily bedsore checks, when a different Medically Trained person discovered a lump of faeces stuck in my bottom from the previous day. 

That was a low point.
Washing myself alone, was and remains impossible and for the duration of my stay, washes were restricted to hand towel baths in my hospital bed. If I was lucky, the Medically Trained Person cleaning my nether regions might have even shut the window to my room for some privacy. Due to staff shortages, during the last week of my stay, no washes were offered and I went a week without being cleaned. Needless to say, washing hair is extremely difficult and something that has happened twice between the 7 September and now.
Thankfully, due to what I like to call ‘performance issues’ I was given a catheter for the first three-four weeks of my stay. After that, I relied on my good old pelvic floor muscles to stop me from soiling myself. How can that be when you cannot walk, I hear you ponder? The answer is long, boring, excrutiatingly painful and another blog post. In the interim however, you just need to know that I have a full back brace, handcrafted to fit my body and imagined perter boobs, which I am allowed to wear to mobilise. 
…………………………………………………………….

This really is a story of never ending gibberish. Maybe grab a cup of tea. Have a wee break. I’d have one with you but my mouth is currently tainted by the delectable taste of 60 mg of steroids per week, so I am only able to stomach the taste of fruit juice. 

Where was I? Right, my health. In addition to the bony stuff, the really smart Medically Trained People had to find out what was wrong with me and if there was anything that could be done about it. This period felt like it would never end, with the feedback I was getting changing nearly everyday. I’m not going to regurgitate all of it, just trust me when I say it was very confusing and everyday resulted in me hysterically crying and Big Sister getting angry. 
I lost count of how many CTs, MRIs, ultrasounds and x-rays I had, but I know it was a lot. It was not uncommon to be collected by the porters, without any clue where I was going or why. I knew where they were taking me on week one, when I had five fractions of radiotherapy to heal my ribs, but as for the rest, it was not like I was in the strongest position to argue or question. I simply did.
Things went downhill relatively quickly. By Day 4 I had tested positive for Paraflu, which gave me a chest infection and resulted in me being relocated to an isolated room on a ward where the staff are nice, but significantly understaffed. One night, I rang my bell for 2.5 hours before I saw a nurse. On the plus side, it meant that I had my own room with a nice view over London. A bonus when you consider the fact that the woman opposite me on the shared ward addressed me as ‘Emily’ and wished me well. 
The hardest part of having the lurgy was that I did not see somebody without a mask on for five weeks. Talk about dehumanised. 
The chest infection persisted, so for extra buoyancy, I also developed sickness and diarrhoea and a temperature. It was lush. 

Notice how I am yet to mention My Myeloma? There’s a reason. My Myeloma failed to behave in the manner of which I have become accustomed. For the first time since I was diagnosed with the wretched beast, I was afraid of it. It wasn’t behaving how I have known it to behave. My paraprotein was the highest it had ever been, and no matter what drugs were tried or the volume of fluid pumped into me, my calcium would not shift below 3.0.

And still I carried on. It may be the biggest test of my willpower and personal strength (because I really have no meaningful life until I am rid of the brace), but I unequivocally told the Medically Trained People that I am not ready to give up with my life yet. As long as the treatment maintains a reasonable balance between quality of life and those dastardly side effects, count me in. Sign me up.

I’m not ready to die yet.

Unfortunately, we soon ended up spending some time thinking about my death. I completed my will and paid for my funeral. Once I was fortunate enough to be on a reasonable treatment regimen, I suffered from what I now believe to be called an Acute Kidney Injury. At the time, it was badged as something far graver than that. I cried for what felt like days. I got so angry with My Myeloma, I told it I hated it. I begged for a reprieve, identifying many people other than myself who deserved the award for ‘Most Deserved Recipient Of The Most Stubborn Myeloma in This Fair Land.’ I really am not saying that other people deserve this illness; I was just surprised to learn that I had not come to terms with the fact I have it. Death seemed so much closer than before I walked into clinic on the 7th September. I don’t know when it will come and that’s the scariest part. How long is my piece of string?
My need for tears grew when I was taken off my morphine, which I had taken in slow release form everyday for five years. There were nightmares and ticks, to accompany my sickness and diarrhoea. I won’t lie; it was a tough, sleepless few days.
Do not fear, I will not prolong this anymore than I need to. They require near constant testing, but for the moment, my kidneys are behaving. It took a week or so for them to turn around. For how long they’ll stay in this state, only time will tell…

Six weeks after I entered UCLH, on 19 October, after a lot of pushing from my family, I was discharged. Gone were the at least daily bloods, out with the cannula resulting in the constant beeping of unanswered alarms. Goodbye to the four hourly observations, even at 3am. Welcome to sudden and ill prepared loneliness with an absent of nurses. So long institutionalised regime. Hello privacy. After six weeks, I am to fend for myself once more. 
Just between us friends; It’s fucking terrifying.

The view from my hospital window

EJB x
P.S. New treatment regime (Velcade twice weekly for three weeks;20mg Dexamethasone the day before, of and after Velcade; Veneoclax eight pills daily

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I Don’t Like Mondays

Tell me why?

Mondays were once upon a time reserved for me not wanting my weekend to end and my working week to begin. In my current treatment cycle, mondays represent something else entirely more negative and I have to admit that I am no longer a fan of them. Gone are the days full of possibilities of the week ahead and in, well, you’ll see…. There may have been a time in my past when I relished a Monday morning. I liked doning a new outfit for my working week that said ‘I’m coming to get you’. Now, that outfit I find myself in is usually my baggiest pair of pyjamas that I will wear for two to three days straight that says something more akin to ‘I’ll let you take me’.

To explain things more fully, I should probably explain that I was not prepared for the start of my new treatment. As something of a veteran now, I was cocky. I thought that I would start my treatment on a Thursday evening and anything to be experienced over the proceeding three weeks would be something I have experienced before. I strongly believed that I would find the treatment to be m easy, simply because I had done it before and lived to tell the tale.  

Unfortunately, my memory is selective. I had forgotten that in the lead up to taking a mountain of Dexamethasone and daily Revlimid tablets, treating my bowel is crucial. I forgot just how horrible it is not knowing when I am going to be unwell, and the frustration I feel when I cannot get out of bed , or successfully count up to 20 and have to watch from the sidelines as my friends live their lives and I lose my independence. During my first cycle, all of this came at me with aplomb. 

Much, much quicker than I had anticipated or hopes, the drugs took over and I could not get out of bed for two weeks. In these darkest of moments, when all I was was my medication,  confidence zapped, I could not see any longevity to my treatment and my life. All I could see was the promise that I would be taking medication indefinitely, unable to earn a living, both outcomes fail to offer me any reasonable quality of life. I’m not asking for parties every night and a warm bodied lover to keep me company, I just want some consistency and a life I can compare with my peers. Sod waiting for a monday to roll round, Cycle 1 made all the days simple merge into each other and made me feel like bother more than a thin veined puppet trapped in the walls of my flat, losing whatever looks I had left, becoming the charity case people contact out of duty. 

I know. I can feel your eyes rolling. 

As my current treatment is fairly similar to previous treatments, in my first cycle, I opted to take my steroids in one go over four days. My previous experience told me this would give me the most free time in the long run. Due to various factors, I ended up doing this after a week of feeling run down rolling into one long period of ineptitude, as well as m swallowing up my week off medication. That first cycle, was without a doubt the worst cycle I have ever experienced since diagnosis and I haven’t even mentioned some of the, erm, smellier side effects.

With the benefit of hindsight, everything about Cycle 1 was a mistake. From my laissez faire approach to it, to the lack of food in the house that could be cooked in the microwave or with a kettle, to my lack of forethought, to my belief that employment was possible, to failing to realise that three stem cell transplants would not have taken their toll on my already delicate body, to me dwelling on the long term impact and disrespecting the now, and mostly, my belief that nothing had changed. Despite all my inner talk about giving up, I believed I was strong and I could manage it with poise, skill and a smile. 

I was wrong.

I needed Cycle 1 to give me multiple slaps in the face. It made me slow down. It made me fill my freezer. It led to multiple trials of laxatives and antiemetics and I think on that front, we could nearly be there. Wherever there is… 

By Cycle 2, the funding for my Ixazomib had come through, that’s oral Cilit Bang between you and me, which once again meant some tweaking to my schedule was in order. When one takes 22-43 tablets a day, that means some tweaking. Firstly, and most crucially, the Medically Trained Person told me that I was no longer allowed to take my steroids in one go. A development that did not please me at all because I like to get the pain out of the way even if it does mean my mouth will taste like tin for a fortnight, my glands will be swollen for a week and washing my crevices becomes a luxury. The lovely doctor, who is not in the least bit scary, softened the blow by halving my monthly dose of Dexathasone. In case you were in any doubt, I live for these small mercies. 

Unfortunately, for the Cilit Bang to work at its optimum, apparently, it needs to be taken weekly, on the same day as the Dexamethasone. Can you see where I am going with this? I have chosen Monday as that lucky day. 

Monday is now known to me and my family, as Heavy Drug Day. My cleaner, who speaks very little English who comes every other Tuesday must call it something else, which probably includes the Russian words for ‘fat’ and ‘lazy’ as I move from one room to the other to carry on sleeping whilst she cleans around me.

In the last few weeks the perverse nature of my treatment has dawned on me. I wake up on a Monday, I could be in a brilliant, jovial mood on that said Monday, but ultimately, I know that at some point that day I will take a cocktail of medicine that will result in me seeing my insides. If he is in the right place and I am too slow, it will also result in the dog seeing my insides. One day, he ate it up as a healthy snack. And that is what my day becalmed. No matter how I feel when I wake up on a Monday, not matter what time I take the medication, I know how the day is going to end.

Such is the doom I feel, my apprehension now creeps up on a Sunday night. The knowledge that come what may, I am going to make yourself incredibly ill, hardly puts me in the party spirit. Most Mondays, I feel like a fool. I feel like I have been tricked in to taking part in some sort of top-secret military physiological experiment to see how guilible people can be fooled into delivering their own torture. It will make you better they said. It will. Now take all the drugs and every single supporting medication you have to go with it. Let it sit in your stomach and churn. Churn. Churn. Then you will see your family again.

The most brilliant part of all of this, is that it isn’t even the Monday when the worst of the side effects hit. It’s the Tuesday. I could have called this blog ‘I don’t like Tuesdays’ but the truth is I find the anticipation of what is to come and the knowledge that I do it willingly by myself, far more ghastly than what actually happens to me on a Tuesday. 

In case you are wondering, in the early hours of Tuesday morning, I will be awoken from my uncomfortable slumber covered in a light layer of sweat, and I will have to quickly get out of my bed and run to the toilet where I will be sick. That is called Vomit Number 1. I am then likely to be vomit up to four times more by lunch. The nausea will last all day. I will feel so weak that I crawl back into my bed and half sleep, half will the day to be over for the entire day.  

Housemate informed me yesterday, that  I do not help myself in this circumstance. I avoid liquids to rehydrate myself because it usually just ends up coming back up again. Not drinking adds to the overall feeling of lethargy and I do not eat. Not eating tends to make me feel even more nauseated and thus the cycle goes on. By nightfall, because I have spent most of the day in and out of consciousness and smelling like a rotting corpse, I struggle to sleep. My body is in all sorts of pain, from a sore throat brought on by my multiple trips to the toilet bowl, a suffering spine from having to run and crouch at said toilet bowl, all mixed with an indescribably horrid steroid comedown. 

It goes without saying that this means Wednesdays, well the Wednesdays I once knew, no longer exist either. I might not be sick on a Wednesday, but I will be weak. It will be unpredictable. I might be able to go to the corner shop for some fizzy water, I might even be able to drink the fizzy  water and follow the plot of a movie, but there is no way of knowing just what my capabilities are going to be on that day or indeed, on the the day after that. With any luck, I will get three reasonable days before it has to start all over again on the following Monday. 

From what I have managed to understand, the level of sickness I get from one tablet is the normal side effect. According to the leaflet that comes with the heavily controlled Ixazomib, I may experience some nausea after taking the pill, but I am definitely at the higher end of the vomiting spectrum. 

I have tried to change the time I take the pill, I have used five different antiemetics, in various combinations and yet the vomit is just as ferocious. The Medically Trained People tell me it is something I have to deal with. Do not be alarmed, I am paraphrasing, it was put to me in a nicer way than that, with understanding and empathy, but it does not change my circumstance of disliking Mondays. For the foreseeable future. 

EJB x

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Cilit Bang – User Survey Spring 2014

Today is a Friday and thus there is 50/50 chance of today being a Velcade Day. Velcade Day always promises to be eventful and by eventful, what I actually mean is a day that features waiting, a short sharp scratch or three and fatigue. The following fortnight between the next Velcade Day will feature fatigue, pins and needles, dead limbs and an attempt at living.

Today was a Velcade Day. I awoke with great enthusiasm at receiving what will now be my 51st injection of the magic bleach. Alas, that did not happen. My Velcade has been postponed due to an increase in the side effects from it, which as I have said before feels like I have rubbed my hands and fingers in fibreglass. Occasionally, it feels like I am shooting lighting bolts from my toes whilst something simultaneously attempts to remove my toe nails. More often, my limbs will go dead after a short period of rest. Since my last injection, I have also noticed an increase in me dropping things. I need little assistance in being clumsy. Last week, whilst reaching for some toilet roll for reasons that are obvious, I dropped the roll and recreated an advert for Andrex minus the Labrador puppy.

So, yes, no Velcade for me today. Instead, I get to wait a fortnight to see if things improve and the Medically Trained People will then decide what to do next. I suspect, I will continue on the disinfectant, but it will be more like a dose of Detol kitchen cleaner than the full Cilit Bang.

Recent events create a mass of questions in my head about the future and length of my remission. It is further complicated by the fact that I was told a fortnight ago that my treatment would come to an end in five more injections. The week before that I was told my treatment was indefinite and today I was told the same thing. In my life, I value consistency and people not getting my hopes up.

On the subject of consistency, as much as I appreciate everything the Medically Trained People do in the wonder of 60 Huntley Street, the timely administration of my Velcade is an annoyance. In the last 10 weeks, only one of the six appointments have gone ahead without some sort of glitch. The most popular cause of delay is due to the Pharmacy not making the big juice in advance of my arrival. The same thing happened today, it was then made by the people in white jackets, to then find out that I would not have it. Ever the cautious tax payer, I hope it now does not go to waste. Maybe that is their argument for not making it before I get there, but I am a busy woman. I do not want a two and a half hour appointment for something that can take thirty. I value my employment.

Right, I think that just about covers where we are with my treatment. But before you jump out of your socks, ecstatic that I will no longer get my Velcade fatigue on Sunday and Monday, I did still have the bone juice today. The bone juice, as much as they say it should not, has sent me to bed. And thus, the normal Velcade Day feeling resumes.

I have got that Friday feeling. I think it feels different to yours.

EJB x

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Trace

45, 36, 26, 29, 24, 23, 21, 20, 19, 18, 26, 21, 21, 20, 19, 8, 7, 5…

Since the 15 August 2012, when a junior Medically Trained Person told me I had an inaudible rare sort of paraprotein in blood, I have been plagued by it’s volume. For the first 12 months, it ruled my life and the monthly test result would determine my mood and resolve for the rest of the month. I lived and breathed that paraprotein level because so much of my life depended on it.

“We must get a partial response of 50% reduction.”

“It has to be below 20.”

“A complete response is 0, and it is unlikely you will get that on PADIMAC.”

“We think it has plateaued.”

“It’s 18, you can go to transplant.”

“I am afraid your paraprotein has increased and you will not be having your transplant. You will have another four months of treatment and then we will see”

“You are unlikely to have a level below 10 after your transplant.”

And so it went… I monitored it and everybody monitored it with me, using a plethora of emojis when it was good news and kisses when it was bad.

To preserve my stoicism, after so many dashed hopes, at some point last year, I told myself that I did not care what it was because I was tired of feeling like I was getting my A Level results every month. In the autumn, for the first time, my paraprotein level reached single figures and then I realised that I did care. The ability to live my life revolves around a figure I have no control over Once upon an infancy, I thought that reaching single figures would be easy, a piece of piss if you will, but for me, it quickly became evident that it would not be a piece of piss. It became out of my reach and the thought of not having a paraprotein level was not even a dream. It was a disappointment.

In recent months, I avoided asking what my paraprotein level was because I did not want to know that the life myeloma has carved out for me was over before I could take off the training wheels. I chose ignorance. Ignorance however, in case you wanted to try it, does come with an unhealthy amount of paranoia and self doubt; and that is how I have lived.

I had a doctor’s appointment recently. It was one of those situations where I had worked myself into silent hysterics prior, mostly because I was informed three days before it that I had to come in for an appointment and then as I waited, I saw The Senior Medically Trained Person and my palms started to sweat. At that moment, all I could think about was my paraprotein level. It had increased to be sure and I would be back to the drawing board.

That is not what happened.

In a matter of fact way, I was told that my current treatment was working because my bloods looked “very good”. Very good, I thought, I must be maintaining my status quo, and I satisfied with that despite struggling through my velcade injections every fortnight. Velcade and all it entails is the payoff. That said, a general comment was not sufficient for me, and seeing as I had made the effort to be half an hour late for my appointment, I used the opportunity to ask what my paraprotein level was and what do you know? I did not have one.

It did not and does not feel how I imagined it would. There are no fireworks in my head. Everyday continues to be an indescribable struggle full of sacrifices and walls, which yesterday’s day in bed would attest to. The overriding feeling I have and this latest development is relief, I feel like it buys me more time. More time to get used to the life myeloma has carved out for me.

Naturally, the Support Network were more enthusiastic about it than I. Emojis and kisses. They do not see that it changes nothing in terms of my daily routine, treatment and ability to see them. My favourite celebration was a fist bump accompanied by the acknowledgement that everyday will still be difficult.

That said, I did let myself smile. A few times.

🎉🎊🎉🎈🎁🎉🎊🎆
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EJB x

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The Inconsiderate Old So and So

The hour is 03:31hrs and I think you need to be aware that at this moment in time, I am highly aware of my hands and my feet. My feet, my hands with their ten fingers, when not buzzing are stinging. Let us throw my left arm into the mix for added discomfort. The effect of which, does not create a snug bug in a rug scenario.

As I am sure you can deduce, I am finding this development to be most inconvenient. For such awareness of appendages, opens the door to thoughts that normally are only permitted one minute of attention per day, before being shut away until the next day, and so on and so forth unless I am feeling ‘hormonal’.

Hands and feet. I have hands and I have feet. There is a thin layer of fibreglass on them.

As parts of my body continue to prickle, it begs the question of why I am aware of them today, when I was not aware of them at all 28 days ago. As one lies in the darkness of night, I can confirm that pondering the possible consequences of me being able to tell you that I have hands and feet, does not directly lead to REM.

Ten fat, marginally hairy fingers. Ten fat, marginally hairy fingers.

Then one remembers a conversation they had whilst receiving the root cause tonight’s unwelcome guest, around someone special’s forthcoming birthday. A birthday, which happens to be a milestone. Then what happens here is a dark trip into Maudlin Town, because a birthday to me is not simply a sign of getting older, it is a big, flashing neon sign that says I have a higher rate of mortality than you. To me, celebrating it is like taking photographs at a funeral; inappropriate.

Fire. Fire. My arches are on fire.

So then, the options for commemorating my birth become more entangled in my brain. Not celebrating it would be depressing. Celebrating it may also be depressing, but then, it may not be. Though what if there is nobody to celebrate it with me, My Myeloma does appear to have diminished the number of people I can turn to for a hug.

Bad vibrations. Bad vibrations.

The thought about one occasion then expands into the wider life losses I have experienced because of my illness. It expands into every life loss I have experienced because of My Myeloma.

Punishment for not being sinistral, that is what this is. Attention seeking.

Then the frustration creeps in. Frustration at being misunderstood; at having no control of my life losses and having to explain the impact of such losses over and over again for it to continue to be misunderstood or bypassed; which in turn only serves to make me feel more and more isolated and alone.

And then before you know it, I am here absolutely hating myeloma and everything it stands for. It is, after all, most inconsiderate. I am resuming some sort of life now and I do not have the time for this sort of nonsense. I am on the 07:35hrs train to Wakefield for goodness sake.

And then it goes round and round and round and round.

Anyway, I must put my phone down now. I have lost all feeling in my thumbs.

💤💤💤💤💤💤💤💤

EJB x

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Special

I have always known that I am one to stand out from the crowd, if said crowd were located on a catwalk. I have always known that I am special, even when I pretend I am
not and that was true long before I had myeloma. I am clearly always looking for evidence to prove that I am both right and special, in case somebody was ever to call me into question. Such evidence also feeds both my confidence and my ego, so I am eager to discover it no matter how tenuous the link.

So imagine my delight on Tuesday when I looked at the treatment board to find that I was special and I was standing out from the crowd. I was so happy about it, I took a photo.

.

20140403-101316.jpg
Proof

Of course, one could say that the reason my name was singled out was nothing to do with me being special. They might simply say that I was the last person to be treated by that section in Daycare on Tuesday afternoon. If they were being accurate, they would say that I was not the last person booked in on Tuesday. I had the last time slot of the day, but that does not mean that I was the only one to arrive at 15:00hrs. I probably was not the only person to wait 75 minutes to be seen by anybody either; it was very busy after all and that meant I had to sit in the greenhouse on an uncomfortable chair again (seriously guests of patients, give up your seat to patients, it is not hard). I was however, the only person on Tuesday afternoon not to have had their Velcade waiting for them . Not only was my medicine not ready for me, it had not been made. The discovery at 16:20hrs, meant that I had to wait for another hour whilst the pharmacy worked their magic. It was an unfortunate fact, especially as my attendance had been confirmed just 24 hours earlier. I did remain remarkably philosophical about the three hour treatment time and I used said time productively, for which I am sure my employers are most grateful. Back to my first point, as I am not the only person to have been delayed in this way, you could argue then, that I was not and am not special.

It’s a tough call. >

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Priorities – 2014

The following is a perfect example of my personal planning requirement.

My priority in 2013, which led to me rescheduling my stem cell harvest, appears to remain my priority in 2014.

Do you know how I know this? I give you exhibits A and B. I believe, they speak for themselves.

AThe Request

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BThe Response

20140218-104637.jpg

Boom! I will go to the ball.

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Velcade Fatigue

I spent most of my Sunday wondering why I was so tired and then getting mad that I was so tired, before I went straight back and wondered why I was tired. In itself, that process is an episode in exhaustion. The exhaustion of which I speak is relative. It compares not to the Steroid Crash, but remains the worst of what I experience during this volume. It

In my mind, there was no reason for the exhaustion, after all, I am being very sensible and adhering to my rule of having a limited social life with so many early nights that I am becoming predictable. Predictable and reliable that is me. I am all about establishing a regime. Even the Costa Coffee Man asks me about my regime. The Regime permits me to live a reasonable life and secondly, judge when something is going wrong. I think I am getting good at it. At least, I was last week anyway.

Last week, I wanted to punch the air when I realised that I had done a 31 hour week, with three evenings of sensible socialising and a day at the hospital. That is real progress. I am with me everyday, so it is difficult to see when I am getting stronger, but even I could see that by close of play Friday, I had achieved something special. I was even told I had more colour on my face, so, get me and my makeup skillz.

In order to achieve such jubilation, I do have to very carefully balance what I can and cannot do. Laziness has to planned. Not seeing my friends has to be planned. I have to plan it all. Last weekend, I had planned to say relax, because my week had been so jammed packed with goodness. Some would say I had written my weekend off, but that would only be the mean people.

Whilst I had planned for rest with my family, I did not plan for Velcade fatigue. When I realised why I was so tired on Sunday afternoon, I was relieved and annoyed in equal measure. I get to see the pattern now, being sensible allows me that luxury. Being sensible does not allow me the luxury of not having a day of tiredness once a fortnight. The reminder.

Being sensible, however, does mean that I can now plan for it. And plan for it I shall. After all, if this is the best I am likely to expect, then I probably should not dwell on it.

EJB x

P.S. In terms of the actions put in place to mitigate the risks associated with another pattern I identified last month, I am happy to confirm that they are working.

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Surrender

There comes a time in everybody’s life when they have to surrender. They have to give in. Their hands are tied. They have to retreat. They are getting ready to wash their hands.

I am at such a point. I am at the end of my tether. I am waving the white flag.

I am finally ready for the laxative.

Please do not be disappointed. I no longer have the time to be constipated. Whilst we are on the subject, I do not have the time for the other thing either.

Yesterday, I realised after spending two hours on a ceramic bowl sweating through my nightie, that I was fighting a losing battle. I can recall my 17 month long reason for not taking laxatives but my enemy has changed, and I do not think my weapons are strong enough. I am too busy to remember to prepare and eat linseed everyday. The fortnightly velcade injection is preventing me from forming a routine, and it is keeping me on my toes with its unpredictable attacks. For two months, I have been unable to take my eye off the ball due to a very real fear of being caught short. I am fighting on my own. In this fight, it is not fair for me to slip my bowel woes into conversations with Housemate when he returns from work. Nobody needs to know. Big Sister is also not prepared for my observation on the frequency and odour of my wind. It is not right.

Enough is enough. My head is bowed.

The truth is, there is not enough time between my injections for my body to regulate and there is too little time between my injections for my body to get used to the cleaning product. It is torture or at least any torture I have ever known. Two months of it.

So, with the treaty signed I really home with these laxatives that I, Emma Jane Jones will be able to start making regular, erm, reparations.

EJBx

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27 Minutes, Minus 2

OMGeezus!

My trip to UCLH a fortnight ago was not a miracle, an exception to the rule, something stranger than fiction. Today, two whole weeks on, I was in, bled, injected and out in 25 minutes, well in would have been 25 minutes if I had not faffed around with wanting to speak to my CNS, to curb a serious bout of paranoia.

I cannot handle this change. 25 minutes does not afford me time to win over the people sitting next to me with my wit, it does not give me time to eavesdrop on the Medically Trained People’s conversations and it certainly does not allow me sufficient time to appreciate the new Doctor’s broad shoulders. It’s not even enough time to drink a cup of tea.

Change is difficult. Change is tough. Change does have to be managed. That is why, 40 minutes later, I am still in the building, finishing my cup of tea, looking at people walking by and fabricating conversations with the people next to me. Plus, in the Support section, they are playing some banging Christmas tunes. Bonus.

EJB x

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